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I 



BY ^ 



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^^^i^S, 



VICTORIAN 



INTERCOLONIAL 



EXHIBITION 



1 8 T 5. 



PREPARATORY TO THE 



PHILADELPHIA EXHIBITION 18T0. 



Opened 2nd September, 1875. 







MELBOUIINE : 

PRINTED FOR THE COMMISSIONERS, BY 

M'CARRON, BIRD & CO., 37 FLINDERS LANE WEST. 



1875- 



YORi^ 






MKLBOUllXK : 

M'CARUON, BIRD AND CO., PIllXTJJRF, 

37 FJiNDEllS LANE WKbT. 



is 

m 



;3 



ROYAL COMMISSIONERS. 



ROYAL COMMISSIONERS FOR VICTORIA. 



Sir Redmond Barry (President). 
The Hon. James Joseph Casey, M. P. 
The Hon. James FoiTester Sullivan, 

M.P. 
The Hon. Caleb Joshua Jenner, M.L.C. 
The Hon. Samuel Henry Bindon. 
The Hon. Sir John O'Shanassy, K.C.M.G. 
The Count de Castelnau. 
James Munro, Esq., M. P. 
Joseph Bosisto, Esq., M.P. 
Rev. John Ignatius Bleasdale, D.D. 
The Hon. Sir James M'Culloch, M.P. 



The Hon. John Thomas Smith, M.P. 

James Gatehouse, Esq., Mayor .of Mel- 
bourne. 

John M* II wraith, Esq. 

Leslie James Sherrard, Esq. 

The Hon. John Alexander Macpherson. 
M.P. 

John Danks, Esq., Mayor of Emerald 
Hill. 

George Collins Levey, Esq., Secretary to 
the Commissioners. 



ROYAL COMMISSION OF NEW SOUTH WALES. 



His Honor Sir James Martin, Knight, 
Chief Justice (President). 

The Hon. John Hay, President of the 
Legislative Council (Vice-President). 

The Hon. George Wigram Allen, Speaker 
of the Legislative Assembly (Vice- 
President). 

The Hon. Sir Edward Deas Thomson, 
C.B., K.C.M.G., M.L.C. Vice-Presi- 
aeiitj. 

The Rev. Charles Badham, Professor of 
Classics and Logic in the University 
of Sydney. 

Samuel Bennett. Esq. , New York. 

James Byrnes, Esq., New York. 

Roderick William Cameron, Esq., New 
York. 

The Hon. George Henry Cox, M.L.C. 

James Reading Fairfax, Esq. 

Andrew Garran, Esq., LL.D. 

The Hon. Samuel Deane Gordon. M. L. C. 

Henry Halloran, Esq., Principal Under- 
Secretary. 

Edwaj-d Smith Hill. Esq. 

The Hon. Thomas Holt, M.L.C. 

Patrick Alfred Jennings, Esq. 



George William Lord, Esq., M.P. 

The Hon. Sir William Macarthur 
Knt., M. L. C. 

William Macleay, Esq. 

Thomas Sutcliffe Mort, Esq. 

Benjamin Palmer, Esq., Mayor of Syd- 
ney. 

Thomas Stackhousc, Commauder R.N. 

Al(3xander Stuart, M.P. 

George Thornton, Esq. 

William Wallis, Esq. 

James Watson, Esq., M.P. 

The Hon. John Brown Watt, M.L.C. 

Fitzwilliam Wentworth, Escj. 

John Williams, Esq., Crown Solicitor. 

William Charles Windeyer, Esq., Barris- 
ter- at- Law. 

Robert Wisdom. Esq., M.P. 

John Woods. Esq. 

William Wolfen, Esq. 

Charles Robinson, Esq., Secretary. 

Philip Francis Adams, Surveyor- General. 

Robert Adams, Esq. 

John Belisario, Esq. 

The Rev. William Branwhite Clarke, 
M.A. 



i 



IV 



ROYAL COMMISSIONERS. 



The Hon. Edward King Cox, M.L.C. 

Edward Flood, Esq. 

Edward Knox, Esq. 

Archibald Liversidge, Esq., Professor of 
Geology and Mineralogy, Sydney Uni- 
versity. 

John Living, Esq. 

The Hon. Jacob Levi Montefiore, M.L.C. 

Charles Moore, Esq., Director of the 
Botanic Garden. 

James Norton, Esq. 



James Powell, Esq. 

Christopher HoUeston, Esq., Auditor- 
General. 

Archibald Thompson, Esq. 

Prosper Nicholas Trebeck, Esq. 

The Hon. James White, M.L.C. 

Charles Smith Wilkinson, Esq., Govern- 
ment Geological Surveyor. 

George Oakes, Esq. 

Walter Lamb, Esq. 

Joseph Thompson, Esq. 

Charles Robinson, Esq., Secretary. 



ROYAL COMMISSION OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA. 



His Excellency A. Musgrave, Esq., 
C.M.G., Governor-in- Chief, &c., &c., 
(President). * 

Hon. H. E. Bright, M.L.C. 

Hon. John Crozier, M.L.C. 

Wentworth Cavanagh, Esq., M.P. 

R. B. Ross. Esq., M.P. 

E. S. Smith, Esq., M.P. 

Samuel Davenport, Esq. 

E. W. Andrews, Esq. 



Josiah Boothby, Esq. 
Joseph Crompton, Esq. 
G. M'Ewin, Esq. 
Caleb Peacock, Esq. 
Dr. Schomburgk. 
J. A. Holden, Esq. 
C. J. Coates, Esq. 
S. V. Pizey, Esq. 
Walter Hackett, Esq. 



F. G. Waterhouse, Esq. 
Messrs. H. P. Welch and Co., Agents. 

C. J. Coates, Esq., Secretary. 



ROYAL COMMISSION OF TASMANIA. 



The Hon. Sir James Milne Wilson, 

M.L.C. (President). 
James Wilson Agnew, Esq., M.D. 
J. M*Carty Browne, Esq. 
Luke Richard Castray, Esq. 
The Hon. W. L. Crowther, M.L.C. 
A. Douglas, Esq., M.H.A. 
G. Gilmore, Esq., M.H.A. 
David Lewis, Esq., M.H.A. 
The Hon. Sir Robert Officer, M.H.A. 
James Scott, Esq., M.H.A. 



A. G. Webster, Esq. 

Morton AUport, Esq. 

The Hon. Henry Butler, M.H.A. 

Edward Lewis Ditcham, Esq. 

Alfred Harrup, Esq., Mayor of Laun- 

ceston. 
John Murphy, Esq. 
The Hon. J. R. Scott, M.L.C. 
C. H. Smith, Esq. 
H. M. Hull, Esq. 
Messrs. H. P. Welch and Co., Agents. 

H. M. Hull, Esq., Secretary. 



IMPERIAL JAPANESE COMMISSIONERS. 

M. Hashimoto. | Haruo Sakata. 

Robert Page, Esq., Secretary. 



INTRODUCTION. 



The change that, in the Intercolonial Exhibition of 1875, has 
been made in the system of classification fi*om that which was 
adopted in former yeai-s, has been done simply with the view to 
follow as closely as possible that classification which has been 
determined upon by the Commissioners of the Philadelphia Ex- 
hibition. The Victorian Commissioners, without wishing to 
offer any opinion as to the merits of the present classification, 
desire the reason to be clearly understood why it was adopted. 

The following are the outlines of the system for the Philadelphia 
Exhibition of 1876 :— . . . 

The Act of Congress instituting the Exhibition of 1876 gives 
the grand outlines of a classification when, in the preamble, it 
annoimces "An Act to provide for celebrating the One Hundredth 
Anniversary of American Independence by holding an Inter- 
national Exhibition of Arts, Manufactures, and Products of the 
Soil and Mine;" and further, by "an Exhibition of the Natural 
Resources of the country and their development, and of its pro- 
gress in those Arts which benefit mankind, in comparison with 
those of older nations;" and again, in Section 1, "An Exhibition 
of American and Foreign Arts, Products, and Manufactures." 

The Commission is thus to provide for the exhibition of the 
products of the soil and of mines, and for all the productions of 
the arts, not only of the United States, but of foreign lands. 

The progressive development of those arts is also to be shown 
comparatively. The requirements of the organic Act were 
carefully considered in the formation of the system of classification 
which follows. This system is based on the idea of evolution or 
derivation of manufactured products from the crude materials of 
the earth. It groups objects in the following order : — 

1. The natural products of the earth useful to man, or the 

basis of manufactures. 

2. The manufactures, and results of the combinations and 

working of such products. 

3. The means and appliances by which the results have been 

attained. 

4. The resultant effects of such, productive activity. 

This is a comprehensive general expression of the classification. 
The raw or unmanufactured materials are placed first, at the base 
or foimdation, and then in succession, as nearly as possible in the 
order of their development, the results of the use of these 
materials, placing at the end the higher achievements of intellect 
and ima^^ination. 



COMMISSION. 



Victoria, hy tJte Grace of God of tlie United Kingdom of Great Britain 

and Ireland Qiieen, Defender of tits Faith, 

To our trusty and well-beloved His Honor Sir Redmond Barry, Kiiight, 
Acting Chief Justice of our Supreme Court of our Colony of Victoria - 
the Honorable James Joseph Casey, Esq., M.P.; the Honorable James 
Forrester Sullivan, M.P.; the Honorable Caleb Joshua Jenner, M.L.C.; 
James Munro, Esq., M.P.; James Gatehouse, Esq., Mayor of our City of 
Melbourne; John M'llwraith, Esq.; and the Rev. John Ignatius Ble as- 
dale, D.D. Greeting. 

Whereas the Royal Commission appointed by us on the fourteenth 
day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred 
and sixty-four, to make a preliminary inquiry ^^ith a view of ascertaining 
whether united action should be taken by all the Australian Colonies to 
secure their proper representation at the Exhibition that has been 
announced as about to be held at Philadelphia in the United States in 
the year 1876, and of suggesting measiu-es for effectually securing that 
object, has now reported to us that the members composing the said 
Commission, after giving the subjects remitted to them the best consi- 
deration in their power, arrived without any difference of opinion at the 
conclusion that it would be advisable that an Exhibition should be holden 
as proposed in the City of Melbourne, to precede the aforesaid Exhibition 
at Philadelphia. And has further reported to us that there appeared to 
it reasonable grounds for entertaining the expectation that other of our 
Colonies in Australia and elsewhere, as well as certain Colonies belonging 
to certain Powers in the Eastern Seas, will respond to the applications 
that have been transmitted to them respectively, and forward specimens 
of the natural products of each for the i3ui'pose of their being exhibited 
in Melbourne on the same occasion. And has fiirther advised that a 



COMMISSION. ^** 

Royal Commission should be appointed with all the powers usually 
bestowed to carry practically* into eflfect the proposed Exhibition at 
Melbourne, and to do all things necessary for the representation of the 
resources of the Colony at Philadelphia. 

Now know ye that we reposing special trust and confidence in your 
knowledge and ability, have constituted and appointed and by these 
presents do constitute and appoint you the said Sir Redmond Barry, 
James Joseph Casey, James Forrester Sullivan, Caleb Joshua Jenner, 
James Mimro, James Gatehouse, John M 'II wraith, and John Ignatius 
Bleasdale, to be our Commissioners, for the following purposes, that is to 
say — 

To take all such measures in detail as are necessary, including the 
erecting and providing the requisite buildings, to facilitate and secure 
the most public exposition of all articles that may be received to be dis-^ 
played at an Exhibition that will take place at Philadelphia in 1876. 

To make a selection therefrom of such commodities as may be judged 
by competent pei-sons most suitable, and possessed of the requisite degree 
of excellence to justify their transmission, for the purpose of affording an 
illustration of the resources of the Colony at the aforesaid Exhibition at 
Philadelphia. 

To undertake the secure transmission to Philadelphia of the articles so 
selected in due time, and their fit exposition there, in accordance with 
the general principles and regulations under which the Exhibition will 
be held in this City. 

To adopt all fitting precautions for ensuring the safe return to the 
owners, or the disposal otherwise if it be so desired by them, of all goods 
and objects entrusted to the Commission from whomsoever received, and 
generally to do and execute all such other matters and things as you our 
said Commissioners may deem necessary for the full accomplishment of 
the duties entrusted to you in the premises. 

And we do by these presents give and grant to you, or any three or 
more of you, full power and authority to carry into effect the purposes 
of this our Commission by all lawful ways and means whatsoever. 

And we do hereby appoint our trusty and well-beloved Sir Redmond 
Barry, our Acting Chief Justice, to be the President of this our Com- 
mission. 

And we do further will and direct that you do report in writing your 
proceedings from time to time to the Governor of our said Colony, or to 



VIU COMMISSION. 

the officer for the time being administering the Government thereof, and 
also make a final report when the entire business shall have beenbrouglit 
to a conclusion. 

And we do hereby appoint for your assistance, in the due executioii 
of this our Commission, our trusty George Collins Levey, Esq., to 
be Secretary to you our Commissioners and to attend you, and his 
services we require you to use from time to time as occasions may 
require. 

And lastly, we do by these presents ordain that this our Commission 
shall continue in full force and virtue, and that you our said Com- 
missioners or any three or more of you shall and may from time to time, 
and at any place or places, proceed in the execution thereof and of every 
matter and thing therein contained, although the same be not continued 
from time to time by adjournment. 

Witness our trusty and well-beloved Sir George Fer- 
gusson Bowen, Knight Grand Cross of the most 
distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George, 
Governor and Commander-in-Chief in and over the 
colony of Victoria and its dependencies and Vice- 
Admiral of the same, &c., &c., &c., at Melbourne 
this twenty-third day of December, one thousand eight 
hundred and seventy-four, and in the thirty-eighth 
year of our reign. 

(Signed) G. F. BOWEN. 

[The Great Seal of the Colony 
is here affixed.] 

By His Excellency's command. 

(Signed) G. B. KERFERD. 

The followiQg gentlemen have been subsequently appointed additional 
Commissioners under the Great Seal of the Colony : — The Hon. Sir John 
O'Shanassy, K.C.M.G.; the Hon. Sir James M*Culloch, M.P.; the 
Hon. John Alexander Macpherson, M.P.; the Hon. Samuel Henry 
Bindon; the Hon. John Thomas Smith, M.P.; the Count de Castelnau; 
Joseph Bosisto, Esq., M.P.; Leslie James SheiTard, Esq.; John 
Danks, Esq. 



INDEX TO CATALOGUE. 



DEPARTMENT 1. page 

Kinerals, Ores, Building Stones, Metals and Metallurgical Products ... 1-11 

DEPARTMENT 2. 

Agricultural Products used chiefly as Food ; Arboriculture, Floriculture, 

and Woods ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 18-29 

DEPARTMENT 3. 

Aromatic, Oleaginous, Saponaceous, Stimulating and Narcotic Substances 
of Vegetable Growth; Perfumes, Chemicals, Fertilising Compounds, 
Varnishes, Dyes, Inks, Blackings, &c. .. ... ... ... 64-69 

DEPARTMENT 4 

Wines, Victoria ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 73-82 

„ New South Wales ... ... ... ... ... 82-84 

„ South Australia ... ... ... ... ... ... 84-87 

DEPARTMENT 5. 
Beer and Spirits ... ... ... ... ... ... 88-89 

DEPARTMENT 6. 
Fibrous or Hairy Substances of Vegetable or Animal Origin ... ... 93-96 

DEPARTMENT 7. 

VY OOX ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... «/0-X\IX 

DEPARTMENT 8. 
Animals, live Stock, Fish, Shells, &c. ... ... ... ... 102-110 

DEPARTMENT 9. 
Animal Products used as Food or as the Basis of Manufactures ... 111-113 

DEPARTMENT 10. 
xjeatner ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... xxo-xx/ 

DEPARTMENT 11. 
Textile Fabrics, Clothing, Umbrellas, Fancy Leatherwork, Pipes ... 119-121 

DEPARTMENT 12. 
Boots and Shoes ... ... ... ... ••• ••. .. 129 

DEPARTMENT 13. 

Jewellery and Ornaments worn upon the person ; Gold and Silver Ware, 

Presentation Plate, &c. ... ... ... ... ... 130-131 

DEPARTMENT 14. 
Wood as Material. < ... ... 133-134 



INDEX TO CATALOGUE. 

DEPARTMENT 15. paoe 

Gas, Coke, Apparatus for lighting and Cooking, Hardware, &c. ... 144-145 

DEPARTMENT 16. 
Paper and Cardboard ... ... ... ... ... 150-151 

DEPARTMENT 17. 

Miscellaneous Hand Tools; Machines and Apparatus of Agriculture; 

Mining; Extractive Arts; Electroplating and Embossing, &c. ... 152-154 

DEPARTMENT 18. 

Firearms, Ordnance, and other Instruments and Apparatus for the 
Destruction of Life, for Hunting, Trapping, Fishing, Military 
Engineering ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 164-166 

DEPARTMENT 19. 

Motors and Apparatus for the Generation and Transmission of Power ; 

Locomotives, Railway Plant, Foundries, &;c. ... «... ... 167-169 

DEPARTMENT 20. 
Boats (Sailing), Steam Vessels ... ... ... ... 173-174 

DEPARTMENT 21. 
Carriages, Buggies, &c. ... ... ... ... ... ^ ... 176-177 

DEPARTMENT 22. 



Educational Apparatus and Methods ; Typographic Aids to thePreserva- 
' isem 
)f I 

Decoration of Dwellings and Public Buildings ... ... ... 181-198 



pogri 
tion and Dissemination of Knowledj^e ; Instruments of Precision and 

[perimeu 
dustrial Designs ;*^ Mosaic and Inlaid Work ; Architectural Designs ; 



edc< 

, E3 



Apparatus of Physical Research, Experiment, and Illustration ; In 



DEPARTMENT 23. 
Musical Instruments ... ... ... ... ... 203-204 

DEPARTMENT 24. 

Agricultural, Mining, Civil, Industrial, and Railway En^eering ; Con- 
struction of Metallurgical Establishments, Models, Aans, &c. ... 205-206 

DEPARTMENT 25. 
Fine Arts ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 207-210 

DEPARTMENT 26. 

Physical Development and Condition ; Medicine and Sanitary ; Benevo- 
lence ; Government and Law ; Religious Organisations and Systems ; 
Educational ; Promotion of Science ; Co-operative Associations ; 
Music ; Drama ; Influence of Exhibitions upon Industry, Art, 
Science, and Civilisation generally ... ... ... ... 235-257 



TASMANIA ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 259-261 

SOUTH AUSTRALIA— NORTHERN TERRITORY 280-281 

STRAITS SETTLEMENTS 287-288 

vJ^mT^xj^ ••• •■• •*• ... ••• ••• ... ••• ^vu*«90 







CHAPEL STREET, SOUTH YARRA 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE CELEBRATED 

"El»€B0SS"BBAilB^ 

AWARDED 

Intercolonial Exhibition, Melbourne, 1875, 

RECOMMENDED TO BE SENT TO PHILADELPHIA. 



Purchasers of every variety of First-cliiss Preserving Fr^iits. 

MARCUS ROBOTHAM, manager. 



B OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



KILPATRICK & CO., 

MANUFACTURING GOLDSMITHS, 





at4wan^^$ and Mmlkn, 



&c. &c. &c., 

BEG to invite the attention of Visitors to the EXHIBITION to 
their unrivalled Stock of WEDDING and other PRESENTS, 
WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELLERY, &c., all made by themselves, 
or purchased direct from the makers. 

E. &. Co. also import Surveying and Mathematical Instniments, 
Parian Statuary, fitted Travelling Bags, Albums, Fans, &c. 



Sa&ings ^anks in Krtaria, 



Commissioners of Savings Banks in the Colony of Victoria. 

The Hok. THEODOTUS JOHN SUMKEB, MX.C., CHAIRMAN. 

HENRY HENTY, ESQ., J.P. 

THOMAS JAMES NANKTVELL, ESQ., J.P. 

THE HON. FREDERICK THOMAS SARGOOD, MX.C. 

The Hon. CALEB JOSHUA JENNER, MX.C. 

Comptroller of Savings Banks 

And Secretary to the Commissioners of Sayings Banks. 

JAMES MOORB, ESQ. 



Offices— Market Street, Collins Street West- 

THE SAVINGS BANKS in Victoria are under the immediate management of 
Local Trustees appointed by the Commissioners of Savings Banks. 
The Commissioners, who are appointed by His Excellency the Governor in Council, 
have the general control of the administration of the Savings Banks, and the sole 
imvestment of the funds, in accordance with the provisions of **The Savings Bank 
Statute, 1875." 

Savings Banks are now established in the following places, viz. : — Melbourne, Gee- 
long, Castlemaine, Sandhurst, Ballarat, Portland, Belfast, Maryborough, Warmsun* 
bool, Kyneton, and Hamilton. 

By order of the Commissioners of Savings Banks. 

JAMES MOOBE, Comptroller and Secretary. 



OFFICUL CAtALOGUE ADVERTISER. v. 



THE 




ttstralasian %xnk 




PUBLISHED AT MELBOURNE EVERY FOURTH WEEK, 

CONTAINS THE 

MOST COMPLETE MONTHLY DIGEST OF THE MARKETS 

OF ANY COMMERCIAL JOURNAL ISSUED FROM THE COLONIAL PRESS. 
Subscription^ONE GUINEA PER ANNUM— Posf,afje Extra. 

THE PRICES CURRENT, 

Incorporated tvith the "REVIEW," and i?icluded in the above Subscription ^ 

TS COMPILED from nearly an Hundred Reports, received from the Principal 
Firms in the City every month, revised under our own inspection, and with 
the benefit of our practical knowledge of the great bulk of the Articles enume- 
rate*; therefore, it may be relied on as furnishing A CORRECT INDEX TO 
THE VALUE OF GOODS IN THE MARKET. 

AD VERTISERS 

BOTH ABROAD AND IN THE COLONIES 

WILL FIND THE "TRADE REVIEW" A FIRST-CLASS MEDIUM, 

AS IT IS EXTENSIVELY CIRCULATED IN 

Victoria, New South Wales, South Australia, Queensland, New 
Zealand, Tasmania ; also in Great Britain and the Continent of 
Europe, the principal American, Indian, and Chinese Ports, 
South Sea Islands, Cape Colony, Mauritius, Batavia, Singapore, 
&o. &c. 

CHARLES WATT & CO., Proprietors, 

80 Queen Street, Melbourne, Victoria. 



sN 



£S M'EWAN & c 

^\ ^ WHOLESALE AND EETAIL ^"^ V— / 



FrUNlSlilXG AN J) (iKNEHAL 



IRON AND M'ETAL MERCHANTS. 

IMPOETEES of ali kuids of AGEICULTUEAL MACHINES, POETABI 

STEAM ENGINES, STEAM ROAD ROLLERS, WEIGHBRIDGES, &c. 




Mag^niicent Stock of Household Furnislungs, 



INDENTS EXECUTED ON THE MOST FAVOURABLE TEPMS 
ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUES ON APPLICATION. 



INDEX TO EXHIBITORS. 



a'Bbckett, Hon. Thos. T. 211, 225 
Aboriginal Station, Lake Welling- 

ton.** ■■• •>• •■• uO, 212 

Aboriginal Station, Church of 
England, Lake Fryeis ... 60, 226 

Acadia Catiierine Ck) 11 

Adams, B. T. 15, 212 

Adams, James 29 

Adams, B. T. ••> ■•■ ••• 138 

Addis, Joanna 122, 125 

Addis, S. ... ••• ••• ••• 125 

Adet, Edward ... ... ... 11 

Aitcheson, Hannah Louisa ... 122 

Aitken, Thomas 89 

Aitken, T. and A 89 

Alcock and Ck). 134, 226, 257 

Alderson and Sons 117 

Alfred Ho6pital,Gommittee of 202,227,256 
Altmann, E. A ... ... ... 225 

Anderson, James 138 

AndTesen,L.C.,65,70,141,145,161,169,171 
Anglo- Australian Press Agency ... 162 

Antivitte, Signor T. 212 

Armstrong, Alexander 102 

Atkin, C. A 60, 111, 171 

Atkinson, Wm 96 

Atyeo, Fred. ... ... ... 141 

Auld, Patrick 86 

Austin, Susanna 121 

Austin, John H. ... ... ... 15 

Australian Handle and Wooden 

Ware Manufactory 138 

Australian Manufacturing Com- 
pany 60, 69, 70 

Baker, Mrs 86 

Bagot, E. M. 61 

BaUy, H. H 227 

Baldock, F. and H. 15 

Baker, Richmond 87 

Baker, Miss Fanny 126 

Baker, John... ... ... ... 138 

Balcombe, A. B 212 

Ballan Shire Council 12 

Ballarat Woollen Company ... 121 

'Bannister, Robert Dixon 225 

Bannister, Milligan and Co. ... 200 

Bank of Victoria 200 

Bardwell, W. ... ••. ... 232 

Baznaid,0. L. 70,87 

Bamingham and Lacy 15 



Barrett and Ca 89 

Barrell, Thomas 89 

Bartlett, Sarah 225 

Barwon Woollen Company ... 121 
Bass River Steam Saw Mills, New 

South Wales 52 

Batchelder and Co. 227 

Beall, Samuel W 174 

Bean, Mrs. Harriet ... Ill, 233 

Bear and Ford 78 

Bell, H. ... ... ... ...66, 71 

BeUandCo. 70 

Bell, Allan 29 

Bennett, T. K. 114 

Bennett and HoUoway 131 

Bentwich, Annie 125 

Bertrand, F. A 76 

Best, Joseph 75 

Bickford, A. M., and Son 89 

Biggs, F. E 171 

Billion and Son, G.... 89 

Bilney, M. A., and Sons 61 

Biram, Richard 162 

Bird, George 113 

Bissimir, Chas. 124 

Black, Helen 52' 

Black, Mary Jane 212 

Blair, Dr. 212,213,214 

Blake and Grutton 117 

Bleasdale, Dr. J. I. ... 131, 168 

Blight, Charles 141 

Blythe, Miss E 215 

Boddy, Edward 61 

Bodington, Robert 154 

Bogle, Andrew, and Co. 138 

Bogle, Andrew 216 

Bolger, Henry 258 

Bonetti, Giuseppe 52 

Bonwick, Wm. P. 171 

Booth, H. O. 136 

Borsa, Battista 114 

Borthwick, Alexander 71 

Bosisto, Joseph 66 

Botanic Gardens, Director of 

39, 49, 59, 62, 71, 96, 121, I69 

Bothwell, James 145 

Botten, W, 71 

Boyd and Head 89 

Boyd, Charles 163 

Bbwie, Helen 135 



xu 



INDEX TO EXHIBITOBS. 



Bowman, John S. ... 
Bowman, John, M,A. 
Brach^, Charles 
Braid, Alexander ... 
Bray^, J. S. ... 
Brearlej Bros. 
Brearlej, Maria 
Brecht, C. J. P. 
Brensing, E. 
Brice, lUchard 
Bright Brothers and Co. 
Briscoe & Co. 
Browne, Greorge 
Brown, G. W. 
Bro¥nie, Mary Augusta 
Brown, J. Clyde 
Brown, Wm. 
Browne, H. J. 
Browne, Thos. 
Browning, George ... 

Bruce, W 

Bruce & Co. 
Bruhn, A. 
Bryant, Kdwin 
Buchanan, Charles... 
Buchner and Sons .. 
Buckley, Edward ... 
Bull, H. ..• 
BuUen, Miss M. 

Burge, S. B 

Burkitt, E. S. 

Burn, Wm 

Burrage, Thos. A, ... 
Burrows, Wm. 
Buncle, John 

Buvelot, L 

Calvert, Samuel ... 

Calvert, W. 

Campbell, Amy 
Campbell, Ed. 
Campbell, O. R. 
Campbell, Archd. J. 
Campbell, Malcolm Alex. 
Campbell, P. 
Campi, Abbondio ... 
Capper, Miss 

Carey, Wm 

Carmichael Brothers 
Carr and Sons 
Carr6, Thomas Domec 
Carse, J. H. ... 
Carter, David 
Castella, H. De 
Castray, L. B. 
Caughey, A. and B. 
Caswell, Hy. Atkinson 
Chambers, Wm. C. ... 
Chambers and Clutten 
Chance, L. A. 
Channan, A. C. 
Chatterton, Thoe. ... 
Cherry, Edward ... 



..163, 



• •• 

• • • 

• • • 

• • • 



Page 
... 2H 

... n 

.. 78, 79 

.. 177 

... 227 

... 117 

121, 135 

... o«S 

... 78 

... 135 

... 12 

154, 160 
... 203 
... 96 
210, 216 
... 126 
... 171 
... 9u 
... 12 
136, 148 
... 90 
... 210 
... 81 
... 216 
... 77 
... 124 
... 29 
.. 227 
... 216 
... 61 
... 61 
... 206 
... 125 
... 233 

155, 160 
... 216 
... 226 
166, 198 
... 216 
... 12 
210, 216 
... Ill 
... 216 
... 131 
... 137 
... 126 
... 117 
... oo 
... 141 
... 210 
... 216 
... 162 
.. 79 
... 227 
... 62 
... 15 
... 177 
... 142 
...61, 71 
... 122 
... 216 
... 138 



Chiles, Samuel 71 

Chuck, T.F. 227 

Chun Pang Cheah Teng 216 

Clapp, O. B. 177 

Clapp, F. B 177 

Clarke, D 216 

Clark, S. A., and Co. 61 

Clark, Wm. Thomas 163 

Clark, Elizabeth 227 

Cleveland, Wm., and Son 169 

Clifford, S. 227 

Cohen and Levy 61 

Cohn, Leah 122 

Colac Shire Council 227 

Cole, Hon. Geo. Ward 210, 216, 227 

Cole, Wm., and Son 61 

CoUingwood Artisan School of Works 258 
Collingwood Poudrette and Am- 
monia Company 67 

Coltman, Edwin 163 

Colville, Henry 1.36, 217 

Commercial Bank of Australia ... 200 
Commissioners Philadelphia Exhi- 
bition 30,39,53 

Comport, Henry 61 

Composition Asphalte Company ... 12 

Connor, James 36 

Cook, John T. C. ... .'.. ... 198 

Cooke, E. D.... ... 135 

Cooper, Alfred 90 

Corbett, A. G., and Son ... 161, 171 

Cornell, Frederick 232 

Cornish and Co 135, 174 

Cornwall, Alfred 15 

Costerfield Gold and Antimony 

Mining Company 12 

Cowan, James, and Co 62 

Coyle, Patrick 90 

Craike, Charles 77 

Cranwell, Benjamin 39 

Creswick, Borough Council of ... 227 

Crippa, F 76 

Crisp, George 132 

Crutch, William ... 178 

Cumming, Smith and Co. 67 

Cunliff, Ellas 62 

Curtis, John 128 

Curtis, J. W. 217 

Daniel, Charles 80 

Danks, Benjamin 161 

Danks, John 132, 145, 161, 169, 171 



Darebin Shire Council 
Davenport, Samuel 
Davey, Thos., and Co. 
Davies, Blanche B. 
Davies, David 
Davies, Emily J. ... 
Davies, John 
Davis, F. C. 
Davis, F. E. 
Davis, James 
Day, Dr. John 



232 
71,86 
... 172 
... 122 
... 176 
... 202 
... 80 
62, 90, 114 
... 36 
... 142 
... 67 



Hn)£X TO EXHIBITORS. 



XUl 



DajleBford Borough Ck>iincil 

De Oonrtet, Madame 

Degotardi, John 

I>e Gnichy, Thomas 

Dellitt, John 

Ddlow, John 

D&partment of Mines, Kew South 

vV Iwldl ••• ••• ••• ••• 

Deppeler, Jacob '... 

De Richelieu, Madame Frederikke 

Dickie, Charles 

Dillon and Bnnows 

Dixon, P. Q. 

Docker, F. G. and J. B 

Donaghj, Michael 

Dos Reis, Jacintha A. 

Douglas and Cameron 
Dow, William Henry 

Dowling, William 

Draper aud Sons 

Drysdale and Fraser 
Drysdale, J., and Mitchell, W. 
Dudgeon and Amell 
Duncan, Alexander 
Duncan, Mrs. Alexander ... 

Duncan and Fraser 

Duncklej and M*Bride ... 

Dunn, J., and Co. 

Dyason, Joshua 

Bamshaw, Ann ... •.. 
Edgecumbe, Mrs. E. B. ... 

Edmanson, T. G 

Educational Department of Vic 

toria ... 
Edwards and Easterby 
Edwards and Kaul... 
Edwards, W. H. ... 
Edwards, William ... 

Egli, F 

Ekman, R. A. 
Elder, John ... 
Emanuel, 8.... ... 

Emerald Hill, Borough Council of 

Evans, G. F. 

Eyans, Henry 

Eyans, Miss Victoria 

Evett, William 

Ewing Brothers 

Eyton, Thomas 

Fallet, F. 

Fallon, James T 

Faul, J. W^. ... ... .. 

Felton, Grimwade and Co. 

Ferguson and Urie 

Fick, H. IT. ... ... • 

Fincham, George 

Findlay, William 

Finney, W., and Co. 
Finn, Quin, and Co. 

Fischer, A. 

Fitts, Charles, and Sons .. 
Fitzpatrick, Rey. J., D.D... 



Page 
232 
128 
228 
174 
135 
135 

12 

77 

138 

142 

... ... biS 

••• ... vU 

*•• ... to 

... ... vl 

... ... 126 

...135,142,145 

... ... ^vv 

142, 146 

• •• .... XiitJ 

158, 169 

12, 14 

60 

62 

145 
142 
62 
90 
217 
123 
114 

225, 232 

36,62 

132 

139 

217 

78 

228, 232 

117 

132 

228 

217 

75 

126 

72 

178 

117 

211 

84,90 

145 

68 

17 

81 

204 

90 

13 

12 

82 

113 

217 



Fitzgerald, N 

Flatow, Mrs. Joseph 
Fletcher, Rey. Wm. Roby.. 

Fletcher, V 

Flett, Peter 

Fiintoff, Thomas 

Foden, Thomas 

Foelsohe, Paul 

Forbes, Elam and Co. 

Forbes, William 

Ford Brothers 

Ford, Dr. F. T. W 

Ford, Frederick William .. 

Ford, Michael 

Ford, R. G., junr. 

Forsyth, — 

Fountain, John 

Francis, C 

Frazer, John, and Co. 

Freeman, William 

Freeman, G 

French, C 

Frost, J. P 

Frost, Mary 

Fry, J. S., and Sons 
Fuchs, Adolph 
Fuller, Alfred 

Fuller, S. P. 

Galagher, S. F. 
Gale, John, and Co. 
Galland, John 

Gant, Eliza 

Garbutt, John 
Gardener, James Henry < 
Gaskell, Mrs. 
Gaunt, Thos. 

Gay, Maria 

Gcach, E 

Guerard, Edward Noel 
Gilbert, Joseph 
Gillatd, Joseph 
Gillespie, Charles ... 
Gillmore, Richard ... 
Gilmour, Andrew ... 
Gittus, Thomas 
Glenister, George ... 
Glenister, W. A. ... 
Goby and Jaubert ... 

Godfrey, R 

Gordon and Co. 
Gordon, Henry 
Gordon, James 
Goyue and Dayis ... 
Gough and Smith ... 

Grant, Mrs 

Graves, J, W. 
Gravenall, Miss 
Gray, Alex., and Co. 
Gray, Waring and Co. 
Green, Henrietta ... 
Green, Richard 
Greenland, W. T. ... 



132, 



Page 
,.. 90 
13, 126 
. 136 
. 217 
. 53 
. 218 
. 142 
. 231 
. 90 
. 13 
. 124 
. 218 
. 176 
. 158 
. 170 
. 117 
. 13 
. 78 
. 228 
. 37 
. 228 
. Ill 
. 199 
51,52 
. 62 

80 
. 91 
. 218 
. 218 

72 
. 178 
. 126 
. 118 
. 178 
. 126 
201, 202 
. 123 
, 162 
. 210 

84 

86 

130 

. 204 

37 
. 126 
, 178 
. 178- 
. 139 
. 139 

91 
. 125 

91 
, 158 

37 

62 

. 218 

> 126 

122 

53 
138 
139 
174 



xiv 



INDEX TO EXHIBITORS, 



Greer and Ashbumer 
Greer, B., and Go. ... 
Gregg and Lord ... 
Gregory, G. Y. 
Greiffenhagen, W. ... 
Griffiths, Miss E. ... 
Grimwood, Thomas 
Groom, Benjamin ... 

Grosse, F. 

Gaest, T. B., and Co. 
Gutheil, Buttner and Co. 
Guthrie, G. D. 
Haferkom, Theodore 
Hall and Co. 
Hamilton, Hon. T. F. 
Hammer, John 
Hanckar, J. L. H. ... 
Harding, Mrs. 
Hardy, Thomas 
Harker, John 
Harkness, A., and Co. 
Harper, Bobert, and Co. 
Harratt, Henry 
Harrigan, M. G. 
Harris, F. A.,junr. 
Harrison, Captain 
Harrop, Job... 
Hany, B. C. 
Hart, Louis H. 
Haselden, Herbert 
Hatfield, Mrs. E. 
Hattersly, John 
Hatton, Alfred 
Heathcote, T. S. 
Hebden, George 
Heine, C. A.... 
Heinecke and Fox 
Hellings, John 
Henty, A. B. 

Henderson, Thos.,and Co. . 
Henkel and Pat^rson 

Hennelly, James 

Henty, Mrs. Bichmond ., 
Hepburn Mineral Water Co, 
Higgins, Joseph F.... 
Hill, Charlotte 

Hill, James 

Hill, William 
Hoare, W. W. 
Hobart Town, Corporation of 

Hodgson and Co. 

Hodgson Brothers 

Hodgson, Bichard 

HofiSian's Patent Steam 

Company 

Hogarth, Julius 

Hogg, S. P., and Co. 

Holbrook, J. B 

Holt, John G. 

Hood and Co. 

Hood, T. and J. 

Hope, James 



37, 



142 

84 

118 

176, 200 

81 

218 

62, 113 

166 

82 

62 

62 

16 

68 

114 

37 

62 

13 

62 

62,86 

148 

168 

60 

178 

123 

16 

218 

62 

199 

111, 123, 166 

126 

122 

91 

130 

203 

233 

82 

60 

179 

226 

166 

146 

91 

126 

91 

139 

123 

148 

146 

136 

227 

146 

142 

• 13 



Brick 



16 
211 
62 
86 
139 
68 
63 
17 



Horsey, Sarah 

Hotham Town Council 

Houghton, W. G., and Co.. 

Howard, John 

Howitt, William ., 

Huenerbein, A. C. . 

Hughes and Harvey 

Hull, Mrs. Hugh .. 

Hulme, Edward . 

Hunt, A. M., and Co., New South 

Wales 
Hunt, William 
Hurst, — 
Huss, E. 

Hutchinson, William 
Huxley, Parker and Co. 
Hyne, Henry 
Hynes, F. M. 
Iliffe, John ... 
Ind, G. F. ... 
Ireland, William 
Jack, John ... 
Jacob, William 
James, D. J.... 
Jeans, 8. E. ... 
Johns, Peter... 
Johnson, Geo. B. . 
Johnson, J. S. 

Johnstone and O'Shannessy 
Jones, Christina 



Jones, D. 

Jones, H. • ... 

Jones, Miss A. A. 

Jones, William 

Joseph Brothers 

Jung, Otto ... 

Raines, J. H. 

Eaul, A. A. ... 

Kay, Joshua Alexander . 

Kearton, Christopher 

Kelly, John F 

iLelly, Xm A^ ... ... . 

Kennedy, James ... 

Kemiedy, J. M 

Kensington Maizena and Starch 
Company ... ... ... ... 63 

Kerslake, Bichard 63 

Keynes, Joseph 102 

Keyston, John 118 

Kierath, Charles 114 

Kilner, Joseph 204 

Kilpatrick and Co 132 

Kilsby, James 37 

Kinross, Bey. John 229 

Kitchen, J., and Sons 70 

Knight, James, and Co. 16 

Kreitmayer, Emily 166,199 

Laidley, John 37 

Lamb^andCo • ... 163 

Lande, W. J. , and Co. ... 139, 1 56 
Lands and Agriculture, Depart- 



Pagre 
... 123 

179 

• « • a/ • 

... 161 
... 211 
... 148 
218, 225, 228 
... 218 



mentof 



63 

... jSiitii 

... 218 
... 225 
146, 149 
13, 143, 211 
... 165 



.. 136 

.. 257 

.. 87 
52 

.. 37 
85 

.. 199 

.. 146 

.. 165 

.. 225 

.. 78 

.. 229 

.. 257 

.. 175 

.. 132 

.. 139 

.. 81 

.. 202 

.. 76 

.. 86 

.. 218 

^ 170 

.. 166 

.. 149 

.. 226 
52, 114 

.. 226 



53 



INDEX TO EXHIBITORS. 



XV 



Langlands FotrndryCo. 
Last, Henrj J. 
Latham, Edward ... 
Lavin, Jolm ... 

Lawrie, A. T. 
Leahy, F. £., and Co. 
Lee, Belinda 
Leighton, James . . . 
Le Grand, A. 
Lennon, Hugh 
Le Souef, A. A. C. 
Levi, Nathaniel 
Levin, A. ... 
Levey, Oliver 
Levy Brothers and Co. 
Lewellin, G. R. 
Lewis and Co. 
Lewis and Whitty ... 
Lewis Brothers 
Liston, John 
Livingstone, Miss ... 
Lock wood, Ann 
Lloyd and Son 
Lloyd, Grant H. 
Long and Co. 
Long, Maria 
Longmire, Thomas ... 
Lord, Son and Co. ... 
Loukes, T. J. 



PJwe 

... 158 

... 175 

... 91 

... 63 

... 63 

... 125 

... 126 

... 128 

... 172 

... 156 

... 166 

... 13 

... 127 

... 163 

... 63 

... 127 

... 127 

... 63 
...37, 63 

... 72 

... 218 

... 127 

... 143 

... 218 
125, 162 

... 219 

... 97 

... 179 

... 54 



Lowe, J. B. ... 130, 146, 172, 199 

Laehman, J. 219 

Lagton, Alexander, and Son ... 156 
Lyon, Cottier and Co. .... ... 17 

Lyon, George 91 

Mack and Ellis 125,162 

Mackay, John 226 

Mackenzie, Eneas 126, 127 

Mackenzie, Lewis ... - 14 

Mackerras, J. T 13 

Macmeikan, J., and Co 68 

Mackiehan, J. 75 

Magarey and Co 64 

Mansfield, Shire Council of ... 13 

Maplestone, C 79 

Markby and Azzopardi 163 

Marriott, Jas 143 

Marsden, Alex. ., 161 

Marsden, Annie L 123 

Martin, Charles B. 125 

Martin, P.J 64,91 

Marshall, J.... ... ... ... 91 

Masters, Wm. Heniy, and Co., 162, 172 

Matthews, W. 205 

Mayall, J. P. 229 

Medhurst and Co. 91 

Melbourne Glass Bottle Works Co. 17 
Melbourne Meat Preserving Co. ... 114 

Melbourne Observatory 229 

Melbourne Shirt Company ... 123 

Melbourne Woollen Company ... 170 

Mellon, Francis 37, 76 

Memmott, Wm 127 



Pa«e 

Meredith, Joseph 164 

Meredith, Mrs. Charles 219 

Meredith, Thos 76 

Alerle, J. ... ... ... s.. ol 

Meyer, Alfred 258 

Meyerhoff— 168 

Michaelis, Hallenstein and Co. ... 118 

Mier, A. B 258 

Mier, Barras 258 

Miller, James, and Co 97 

Miller, Joseph 206 

Milliken, David 172 

Millward, James .. 64 

Milton, Mrs. F 72, 175 

Mines Department of N. S. W. ... 12 

Mitchell, Graham 127,166 

Moncrieff, John 37 

Monk, D. J. (New South Wales) ... 64 
Moody, John (South Australia) ... 92 

Moody, L. A ... ... 68 

Moore and Co 13, 156 

Morrison, L. K 229 

Morton, William Lockhart ... 172 

Moss, George 123 

Mourant,J. T. 139 

Muirhead, John 72 

Muller, Frederick 127 

Munn, A. L.... ... ... ... 64 

Munro, Alex. 83 

Munro, David, and Co. ... 156, 170 

Murphy, Edwa»d 143, 146 

Murray, Jane Ann 125 

Murray, John 15 206 

Musschialli, Louis 138 

Myring, Joseph 37, 64, 92 

M'Call and Anderson 172 

M^Callum, Argyle ... 13 

M^Comas and Co. 172 

McDonald, A., and Sons 179 

M'Donald, Donald 229 

M'Dougal, Miss 97 

M'Ewan, James 136 

M'Ewan, James, and Co. 136, 143, 146 

M*Ewin, George, and Son 63 

M'llwraith, John 149 

M*Kenzie, J. F., and Co 60 

M'Lean Brothers and Bigg, 

136, 139, 146, 156, 172 

M^Nair, Angus 37 

McNeill, T.H 219 

M'Pherson, Thomas ... 97, 170 

Nance, Davies and Co 159 

Netfleton, Chas. 229 

Newman, J. Hubert 229 

New North Clunes G. M. Co. 200, 229 
New South Wales Shale and Oil 

Company ... ... 14 

Nicholson and Ascherberg 199, 205 

Noble, Timothy 229 

Nolan, Luke 16 

Noone, John 230 

Norman, Harriet .^ 230 



xn 



INDEX TO EXHIBITORS. 



Norman, Wm. Jas. 

Norris, D. ... ... 

Norris, T. W. 

North, A. J.... 

Northcote Patent Brick Co. 



Page 

136 

143 

70 
111 

16 



North Eastern Agricultural Society , 38 

Norton, John ' 230 

Nutt, ThoB. W. 211 

Nutting, Miss B 219 

Oakden, Percy 219 

Oakden, Richards and Cuthbert ... 64 

Oakey, Wilmot 143 

Ogrilvie, Christian 175 

O'Keefe, Andrew 38, 113 

0*Keefe, Edward 147 

O'Malley, Edmund 159 

O^Malley, Bev. Joseph 205 

O'SuUivan, A. P 219 

Owen, Mrs. J 127 

Paley, Mrs. E 136 

Parker and Co 147 

Pamell, M ; 82 

Parrot, F. B. ... , 179 

Partridge, John 202 

Paterson Brothers 136 

Patten, Emily S 149 

Patterson, Catherine 219 

Pausacker, Evans and Co. ... 128 

Pearse Brothers 118 

Pearson, C. K. 201 

Pearson, Elizabeth 127 

Pedroncinni, P 226 

Penal Establishments, Inspector of, 

118, 123, 130, 140, 199 

Pepper, George 143 

Perrin, Wm., junr 64 

Perry Brothers 206 

Perry, G. W 230 

Perry, Hunter and Co 159 

Perry, Jojin ... ... ... 179 

Perugia, Antonio 211 

Peters, Edwin Francis 70 

Pettit, G. E 97 

Phillips, Emily Bertha 127 

Phillips, Wm. 211 

Phoenix Foundry Co 232 

Pierce, G. G. 114 

Pittard, George 201 

Pohl, Carl 80,92 

Poison, Angus ... 38 

Porta, Joseph 1.39 

Postmaster-General, Victoria ... ,201 

Potter, Andrew ... ... 170 

Potts, Mrs. R 125 

Power, Ellen 124 

Prahran Town Council ... 230, 233 

Preist, Thompson 14 

Prentice, William Ill 

Prevot,B. J. 92 

Price, Frederick ... 226 

Prince, James 147 

Proctor and Hill 143, 175 



Public Works, Inspector-General of 

Pullin, A. R. 

Parves, James ... ^20, 221, 

liiaciice, A» ••• .. •« ... 

Raleigh, M. ... ... .. ... 

Ramsden, Samuel 

Randall, A. C. E 

Rankine, William 

Rounsville, W. B 

Reed, Henry, and Co. 

Reid, Charles ... 2 

Renard Brothers and Co. ... ... 1 

Rhodes, Mrs. T. K ... Ij 

Richards, Thomas 199, 2^ 

Richard, Samuel, and Sons... 64, 1 

Richman, J. W ^ 

Richmond, A. E 122,12 

Riddell, J. S 14 

Riddell, Joseph ... 11 

Riddle, Thomas C 20 

Rielly, Isabel .~. 12i 

Riggs, John... • 3^ 

Ritchie, John 71 

Roberts, A., and Sons 172 

Roberts, S. H 203 

Roberts, J. H 199, 222 

Roberts, Mrs. Annie E 202 

Roberts, Owen 161 

Robertson, Alex 114 

Robertson, George 16.^ 

Robertson, John 102 

Robertson, Miss 128 

Robertson, Wagner and Co. 118, 179 

Robinson, Ch arles J 1 40 

Robinson, T., and Co 167 

Rocke, W. H., and Co. ... 137, 143 

Roellens and Burdett 130 

Roeszler, Charles G. 163 

Rosier, John 130 

Ross, R. D 87 

Rossi, Thomas 38 

Rothwell, Wade 118 

Rowden Bros .140 

Howlands and Lewis 92 

Royal, Joseph, and Son 179 

Rudd, E., and Co. ... 64 

Rule, W. J. and M 198 

Samwells, H. 179 

Schmidt, F 78 

Schmidt, Louis 38 

Schroeder, E 76 

Scott, James 38 

Scott, Miss Rosamonde 222 

Scotthom, William 172 

Scrase, Edwin 140 

Scurry, James 222 

Secombe, J. 116 

Selle, C. H 147 

Serisier, J. L 83 

Service, James, and Co 169 

Seymour, John Henry 169 

Sharp and Sons 98 



mXBZ TO KXHIBROKS. 



Shav, Alfred, and Go. 

Shaw, Charles 

obaw, ir. A.*.,. ... ••■ 
Shaw, M'Naaghtxn and Gdc 
Shenandoah Company 

Short and Sattxxi 

ShntUeworth, William ... 
Simms and Chapman 
Sinclair, Mrs. Ellen 
Sloane, William, and Co. ... 
Sloggatt, William ... 
Smart, «J. <!.... ... ... 

Smith, Alexander 

Smith and Son 

Smith, S. D. «.• .•• 

Smith, Dr. L. Ij. ... ... 

Smith, Q. S. ... ... ... 

Smith, J. H., and Son 
Smith, J. J., and Co. 
Smith, Mrs. J. J. ... 

Snowden, E. G 

Solly, Mrs. Amelia 

Solomon, S., and Co. 



,. 140 
69,98 
. 82 
.. 140 
- 14 
. 124 
.. 157 
92 
. 52 
. 64 
. 2 22 
. 164 
.B9, 70 
.. 64 
.. 222 
.. 222 
.. 80 
.. 222 
,. 118 
.. 137 
.. 80 
. 222 
,. 138 



«»• 



South Australian Commissioners 38, 150 

South Australian Jam Co. ... 65 

Speaing, W. 16 

Spink and Son ... 132 

Spink, G 80 

Staff, Mrs. Charles 127 

Stanway, W. 137 

Steele and Co. 115 

Steimle, John J 137 

Stenbeck, C. G 154 

Stephen, Francis J. S. 175 

Stevenson and Elliott 180 

StevensoD, Thomas. 222 

Steward, James 92 

Stocks, E. D. 222 

Stokes and Martin 164 

Stone and Kobottom 140 

Stoneman, Alfred 180 

Stoneman, Edward 180 

Storer, Joseph ... 124, 130, 162 

Strachan and Co 64 

Stratford, T. H 14 

Strelein, Charles 223 

Stringer and Co 65 

Stmtton, Robert .... 92 

Stuart and Ferguson 38 

Sturtevant^ B 132 

St Amaud Pastoral and Agricul- 
tural Society 38 

St. John, F. ... .. ... ... Ill 

Sngden, Thomas 114 

Sullivan, Joseph 69 

Swallo^ and Ariell 65 

Swan and White 167 

Swaim and Co 69, 70 

Taegstow, F. ... ... ... 92 

Xaiv^ Inf. J). ... ... ... ... 1^4 

Taylor. B.B. 211 

Taylor, (George 128 



Taylor, James 
Taylor, John 
Taylor, Mrs. James... 
Temperley, John B. 

Teriy, Albert 

Tbitchener, H, T 

Thomas, John 
Thomas, Thomas C. 

Thorpe, Miss 

Tilly and Clack 

Timbrell, Ann 

Tombs, Burton 

Tondeur and Lempriere .. 

Tong, W. S. 

Toohey, J, T., and Co. 

Tope, Hubert 

Toppiug, John 

Tracy, J., and Co. 

Train, William, and Co, .. 
Trengrouse, Nicholas 

Trevett, Richard 

Troedel, Charles 

Tronsou and Rutherford .. 
Trouette and Blampied 

Tuff, Esther 

Turner, James H 

Turnbull, Thomas 

Tyson, Thoiiias 

Underwood, Thomas 
Van den Houten, C. A. 

Veness, Edward 

Victorian Academy of Arts 
Victorian Blind Asylum 



... U 
S9 
... 128 
72,169 
... 9:1 
.. 202 

.. isr 

... 102 
... 234 
69, 70 
98, 128 
170, 176 
... 231 
... 65 
... 92 

... isr 

... 140 
... 9«S 
... 143 
... 226 
122, 223 
... 226 

... vO 

.. 76 

... 126 

... 124 

... 140 
159 

... 72 

... 223 

..• 65 

... 223 

... 124 



Victorian Carriage Company ... 180 
Victorian Deaf and Dumb Insti- 
tution 130 

Victoria Ice Company 140 

Victorian Iron Rolling Company ... 14 
Victorian Ladies' Sericulture Com- 
pany 98 

Victoria Woollen Cloth Manu- 
facturing Company ... 122, 170 

Vettler,John 80, 77 

Vockler, John IH 

Vollum, James 224 

Walker, Fredk 114 

Walker, A. R 147 

Wallace, J. A 14 

Wallace, Miss 224 

Wallace, W 147 

Wallan, R. E 224 

WallisandCo 118 

Wallis, F., and Sons 147 

Walton, Elijah 224 

Wangaratta Borough Council ... 231 

Warrenheip Distillery Co 93 

Waters, James 66 

Watson, Alexander 102 

Watson Bros 65 

Watson and Patcrson 115 

Watts, George 180 

Watts, W. K. 175 



XVUl 



INDEX TO EXHIBITORS. 



Webster, Jalnes 
Weber, Jacob 
Welch, H.P.... 
Welch, H. P., and CJo. 
Wehis, Gustav A. ... 



Page 
... 76 
77 
166, 202 
... 143 
... 203 



Western Meat Preserving Co. ... 115 

West, R. X. ... ... ... ... 198 

Western Australian Government... 200 

West, J. and B 157, 180 

Wetherill, Thos 205 

Wherritt, C 231 

White, George 86 

White, J. B 200,224 

White, Daniel 180 

White, David ... ... .. 169 

Whitehead, Isaac 138,224 

Whitehead and Co 164 

Whitestone, Miss 234 

Whitestone, Percy B 234 

Whitestone, Mrs 234 

Whitney, Chambers and Co., 

132, 137, 141, 148, 202 

Whitfield, Joseph 164 

Whitton, Harry 226 

Wiegmann, August 141 

Wilding and Co 158 

Wilkinson, Jane 

Winder, D 234 

Willett, George 231 

Williamson and Co. 98 

Wilson, Andrew 200 ' 



Wilson, Corben and Co. ... 

Wilson, Hugh 

Wilson, J. S. 

Wilson, Samuel 

Winston and Co 

WitheU, Mary 

Wolf, Rudolph 

Wolstencroft, John and Wm. 

Wood, David 

Wood and Son 

Wood, Wm. Booth 

Woodward, G«orge 

Wright, Annie 

Wright, Alice 

Wright, B. W. a, 
Wright, John 
Wright and Bdwards 
Wright, Payne and Co. 

Wurm, Fred]^ 

Wyndham, G. 

Wyndham, Wadham 
Yarra Bend Lunatic Asylum 

Young and Co 

Young, Mrs. Ann 

Young, C. B. 

Zevenboom, John 

Zevenboom, Wynand 
Zom, Bdward 



Pa^e 
14, 143 
... 162 
17 
... 102 
... 226 
... 128 
... 164 
17 
... 231 

• • • vii 

69 
69 
... 225 
... 128 
... 86 
.•• 22d 
170, 172 
••• 65 
... ov 
•« • o^ 

... Oif 

... i/O 

65 
... 124 
... 87 
... 141 
... 141 

65 



Zoological and Acclimatisation 
Society of Victoria ... 98, 202 



INDEX TO BXHIBITOBS. 



XIX 



TASMANIA. 






Creswell, C. F. 
Dalgeij, Moore, and Go. ... 
Davles, Arohdeacon 
Davies, R. H. 

Dean, William 

Degraves, John ... ,.. 

Dossetor Brothers 

DowUng and Johnstone ... 

Edwards, G. W. 

Elliott, G. B. B« ... ... 

Evans, G.F. 

f f jr, \X. ... •*. ... 

Gardner and M*Eenzie 
Gaylor, Charles William ... 
Gibson, William ... 

Gillon and Sons 

Glover, C. A. 

Crongh and Smith 

Gracie, William 

Graves, J. W. 

Graves, Mrs. John Woodcock 

Groom, Frederick 

Gnllivar, B. 

Hammond, W. 

Harconrt, James 

Harrap, A. ., ... 

xxayes, V. ... .«. ••• 
Hayes, M. ... 
Hematite Iron Oompany ... 
Hematite Iron Works 
Hogarth, D. ... ••• ... 
Holroyd, Kennedy and Co. 



Page 
Anglo-Australian Guano Company 269 

Archer, W. H. D, 264 

Amett, Simon 273,274 

Baily, H. H 277, 279 

Barnard, E. K,, Admiral 267 

Bebbin and DowdUl 267 

Bibbe, F. F. 278 

Bidenoope, J. 275 

Blyth, Miss 275 

Blythe, Miss E 277 

British and Tasmanian Charcoal 
Iron Co. ... ... ... ... 262 

Bulman and Johnston 274 

Burgoyne, W 267,269 

Carlsen, P. 267, 275 

Castray, L. R 267, 279 

Cemetery Commissioners of Hobart 
Town ... ... ... ... 276 

Chanceelor, Edward 270 

Chapman, A. K. ••• ... ... 262 

Clifford, S 279 

Colvin, Dharles 269 

Corporation of the City of Hobart 

Town 279 

Coverdale, Dr. J. 262, 267, 269, 271, 276 

... 265 
... 265 
... 271 
... 271 
... 265 
269, 270 
... 265 
... 275 
... 269 
... 267 
... 277 
... 274 
270, 274 
... 277 
2652692 
... 26 
... 267 
... 266 
269, 270 
266, 277 
... 276 
... 262 
... 266 
... 262 
... 262 
262, 266 
... 273 
... 275 
... 276 
263, 268 
... 266 
... 274 



Pa«e 
267,276 

276 

... ... ^o«S 

271 

2681276,277,279 

... ... *oo 

... ... ^7o 

... ... «Oo 

... ... /itA 

... ... aDV 

... 274 

... 273 

... 263 

... 266 

... 263 
270, 274 

... 269 



• ... 



Hooper, G. ... 

Hope, Miss Mary ... 

Hall, Henry J. 

Hull, Henry 

Hull, Hugh M. 

Hull, Miss 

Hull, Mrs. Hugh : 

Hurst, James ... ... 

Innes, J. H.... 

John^n, Thomas 

Johnson, G., Brothers and Co. 

Joyce, John 

Just, Thomas Cook... 

Kemp, George 

Kermode, W. A. 

Latham, J. ... 

Laughton, James ... 

Lipscombe, Frederick 266 

Lloyd, Grant H 278 

Luehman, J. ... ... ... 278 

Lunatic Asylum Commissioners of 

Tasmania 270 

Lyell and Gowan 263 

Meredith, Mrs. Charles ... 276, 278 

Mitchell, James 270 

Mitchell, Mrs 270 

Moir, J. ... ... 276 

Moore, William, Hon 277 

Mount Bischoff Tin Mining Com- 
pany ... ... ... ... 263 

Murray, William 270 

Nicholson, Thomas 266 

Nicholson, Anthony 266 

Omant, J. ... ... ... ... 271 

Price, Rev. C. .: 268 

Rayner, E 263 

Read, R. C 268 

Romdall, A. C. E 278, 279 

Royal Society of Tasmania 264, 277 
Salmon Commissioners of Tasmania' 273 
Schmidt, B.... ... ... ... 27 

Seymour Coal Company 264 

Sharland, W. C. 266 

Sharland, W. S. ... ... 266,268 

Shaw, F. ... ... ... ... 268 

Shields, R. R. 264 

Shoobridge, E., and Sons ... 266, 269 
Smart, Dr. ... ... ... ... 264 

Smith, James 264 

Solly, Mrs. 'Amelia 278 

Stanhope Company 264 

Stewart, J. W 270 

Strachan, R. 264 

Stubbs, Misses ... 278 

Stubbs, Thomas 278 

Swift, A. H. ... ... ... 264 

Tasmania Mineral Exploration Co. 264 



XX 



INDEX TO EXHIBIT0B8. 



Page 
Tasmaniai Commissioners of, 

264, 274, 276, 279 

Taylor, David 271 

Thompson, Mrs. John 266 

Tolman,J. 0. 268 

Tondeur and Lempriere 279 



Walch and Sons .. 
Walchj W., and Son 

Wherritt, C. 

Wiggins, R 

Wood, R. 

Wright^ Stephen H. 



Page 
276, 277 
277 
279 
264 
270 
266 



SOUTH AUSTRALIA. 



Abbott, Jones, and Buchanan ... 261 

Ayliffe, T. H 281 

Beatson, D. K 284 

Becker, T. 281 

Bednall, W. T, 285 

Brese, William* and Stark, August 281 

Caledonia New Amalgamated Co. 281 

Cardwell, B;obert 285 

Clarke, Francis and Sons 281 

Foelscbe, Paul , 286 

Frew, John 283 

Golden Stream Claim 281 

Gomez, Emanuel 284 

Griffiths, W, K 281, 282 

Grove Hill Company 281 

Gunn, J. M. ... ... ... ... 282 

Hughes, W.B 284,285 

Kekey, J. E. 284 



Knight, J. G. 

Lewis, John... 

Manders, — 

Menghine, Bernardo 

Miller, C. and J. ... 

New Telegraph Company 

Oldham, F. B. ... 

Perrin, G«o. S. and fl. W 

Sandy Creek Prospecting Claim . . . 

Sandy Creek Puddling Company.. 

Scott, G. B. . . . 

Shepperd, E. 

Stranord, — - 

Tripp, J. P. 

Union Prospectors* Company 

Westcott, «r. S. and Wisendunger., 

Whitelaw, E. H 



282, 284^ 285 
282 
282 
282 
282 
282 
282 

284, 285, 286 
283 



283 
284 
283 
283 
283 
283 
283 
283 



SINGAPORE. 



Bonstead and Co. . . . 



... 288 I Baffles Library, Museum, & Garden 292 



JAPAN. 



Kiritzukosho Company 309 | Shippo Company ., 



... ^tfO 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. rii 



MELBOURNE GLASS BOHLE WORKS 



THE undersigned are prepared to supply Bottles, made and stamped to pattern, 
to fill all the requirements of Manufacturing and Dispensing Chemists, 
Manufacturers of Oilmen's Stores, Pickle Makers, Fruit Preservers, Jam Makers, 
Manufacturers of Sodawater and other JErskted Waters, showing a considerable 
reduction in prices as compared with imported glassware. 

The Proprietors of the Glass Works have received the following statement as to 
the Strength and Quality of their Sodawater Bottles, from the well-known firm of 
Messrs. Rowlands and Lewis, Melbourne and Ballarat : — 

Messrs. Felton, Grimwade & Co. 

Gentlemen, — We have much pleasure in acqtiainting you that we subjected six dozen 
fr<ym the ten gross of Sodawater Bottles, made by t)ie Melbourne Glass Bottle Com- 
pany, to a test of from 110 lb, to 125 lb. pressure to the square inch, and that tfiey 
stood the severe ordeal admirably, a« not one broke. We consider them equally as 
strong and well-made as the best English Sodawater Bottles. 

December 21st, 1874^ BO WLANDS d: LEWIS. 

A lar^e stock of Medical Stock and Dispensing Bottles, Sodawater Bottles, 
Gingeraae Bottles, Seltzerwater Bottles, Sauce Bottles, Pickle Bottles, Medical 
Bottles, Salt Jars, Pocket Flasks, &c., always on Sale. Price Lists on application. 

FELTON, GBIMWADE and CO., 34 Flinders Lane West. 



SMDEID&E CHEmCAI WOEKS. 



Sulphuric Acid, for Manure Making S.G. l-oOO 

Manufacturing Uses ... S.G. 1710 

(Oil Vitriol) S.G. 1-825' 

Pure Highest Concentration, S.G. 1-843' 

Acid Hydrochloric, Commercial .. . S.G. 1130 



it » 

ft » 



„ Jl URE ... ... 

Nitric, Pure 

„ Commercial 

NiTROS. 

SULPHUROS. ... 

Sulphate Soda, Sulphate Iron, Soda Ash, Nitrate Soda, 

Nitre Cake, Potashes. 

FELTON, GRIMWADE & CO., 

34 FLINDERS LANE WEST, MELBOURNE. 



S.G. 1160° 

S.G. 1-470° 
S.G. 1-500° 
S.G. 1-420° 
S.G. 1040° 



Samples of the products of the Kelhonrne Olass Bottle Works and the 
Sandridge Chemical Works on Yiew at the Exhibition. 



viii OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISEE. 

THE OLDEST AND LARGEST MANUFACTORY IN THE COLONY. 



ifllHIIlU 




mkM. 



s. SOLOMON & co;s 

FURNITDRE WAREHOUSES. 




flwanston and Lonsdale Streets, Melbourne, 



'ALTSON, 

UAirarACTviLEit. 07 oolokial 

SADDLERY, HARNESS 



tf itc. 4:c-, 



26 Bsurks Stint Weeit, ICelliounie. 




E 5* A- 1 K a 

Iieittly JZxnnilwl. 

^'IQ. CABEIAGE and BUGGY HARNESS MADE TO ORDER. 

^isen's Saddle and Harness Manufactory, 

UlltllKE STBKCT WEST- 



•<f 



V ARE NOW SHOWING <^ 



A large assortment of articles in Leather, Wood, and 
Onyx, specially selected as being suitable for presents, 

COMPRISING- 

TBAVELLmO BAGS, 

DEESSmO CASES, 

JEWEL CASES, 

LADIES' COMPAJ^IOJ^S, 

BELT BAGS, 

BELTS, 
WEITIJ^G DESKS, 

WORK BOXES, 

SCEJVT CASES, 

HAJ^DKERCHIEF BOXES, 

GLOVE BOXES, 

CARD TRAYS. 



I ♦ I- 



SANDS & MODOUGALL, 

COLLIJVS STREET WEST 



VICTORIAN 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 



OFFIOIAi:, 

CATALOGUE OF EXHIBITS. 



DEPARTMENT 1. 

MINERALS, ORES, BUILDING STONES, METALS 
AND METALLURGICAL PRODUCTS. 

EXPERTS. 



William Jolmson, Esq. 
W: G. Lempriere, Esq. 



J. L. Morley, Esq. 

J. C. Newbery, Esq., Chairman. 



Joseph Reed, Esq. 
G. H. F. Uhich, Esq. 



Although the days when every bucketful of washdirt was supposed 
to contain sufficient gold to remunerate the miner for the voyage from 
Europe to Australia are past, and the rich alluviums of the early gold- 
digging era are almost ended, the production of the precious metal still 
continues among the first of Australian industries. Quartz-reefing has 
taken the place of alluvial digging, deep sinking has superseded surfac- 
ing and paddocking, and the pick and shovel are supplemented by costly 
machinery and scientific appliances. Of coui'se the production of gold 
&x>m great depths entails a much greater expense than it did in former 
times, but once found the returns are larger, and last most certainly for 
much longer periods. As an instance of this may be mentioned the Long 
Tunnel Company, Walhalla, which, for nearly seven years, has steadily 
been paying dividends that represent a large interest for the capital 
expended in the purchase of shares. Attention has been turned to the 
other mineral wealth of Australia, and she bids fair to become promi- 
nent amongst mineral producing countries, with Victorian gold and 
New South Wales coal, South Austmlian copper and the various 



2 CATALOGUE OP THE 

mineral riches of Queensland, Tasmanian ironstone and tin, and 
Western Australian lead. The intention of this essay is to review 
shortly the mineral resources of Victoiia. 

GOLD. 

The total area of the auriferous and quartz grp^nd actiially opened up 
is 1063 square miles, and the nimiber of distinct quartz reefs known to 
be auriferous is 3398. From the commencement of the publication of 
statistics relative to the yield of gold, up to the 31st of December, 1874, 
the amount of vein quartz crushed has been 11,441,638 tons 6 cwt.; the 
yield of gold therefrom has been 6,447,640 oz. 6 dwts., or an average 
of 11 dwts. 6*49 grs. per ton. During the eleven years ending 3 let of 
December, 1874, the quantities of tailings, mullock, &c., treated were 
1,663,033 tons, which yielded 299,117 oz. 4 dwts. 2 grs. of gold, or an 
average of 3 dwts. 14*33 grs. per ton. During the six years ending 
31st of December, 1874, the quantities of pyrites, blanketings, &c., 
operated on were 25,445 tons 4 cwt., yielding 70j551 oz. dwts. 14 
grs., or an average of 2 oz. 15 dwts. 10 '88 grs. per ton. It was only in 
the year 1860 that the treatment of these stuffs was commenced. 
Statistics show, during the past two years and nine months (the time 
attention has been turned to washdirt), that 3,351,467 tons 7 cwt. 
yielded 214,767 oz. 10 dwts. 12 grs. of gold, or an average of 1 dwt. 
6-76 grs. per ton. 

The yield of gold in the year 1874 from 967,069 tons 9 cwt. of quartz 
was 573,220 oz. 17*5 dwts., or an average of 11 dwts. 20*21 grs.; from 
69,439 tons of quartz tailings and mullock the yield was 6866 oz. 1 1 
dwts. 10 grs., or an average of 2 oz. 16 dwts. 7*82 grs. per ton; from 
6725 tons of pyrites and blanketings the yield was 18,941 oz. 14 dwts. 
13 grs., or an average of 2 oz. 16 dwts. 7*82 grs. per ton. 

As compared with 1873, there is a small decrease in the quantities of 
vein quartz treated, but the gross quantity of gold obtained from vein 
quartz in 1874 was 6006 oz. 10 dwts. 3 grs. in excess of that got in the 
year 1873. During the past five years there has been a gradual increase 
in the quantities of gold obtained from vein quartz, and the average 
yield per ton in 1874, notwithstanding that much of the quartz is now 
extracted from levels at great depths, is satisfactory. 

During the year 1874 there was a great increase in the quantities of 
quartz tailings. The quantity of quartz tailings treated in 1874 shows, 
as compared with the quantity treated in 1873, an increase of 44,052 
tons, and the yield shows an increase of 3986 oz. 11 dwts. 5 grs. The 
amount * of pyrites and blanketings treated in 1874 exceeded that 
operated upon in 1873 by 1157 tons 15 cwt., and the yield of 1874 
exceeded that of the previous year by 3053 oz. 16 dwts. 5 grs. 

It is evident that very great attention is now being given to the vast 
heaps of tailings, &c., that accumulated when the methods of extracting 
gold were not so efficient as at the present time. But the mineral 
statistics of Victoria for the year 1874 point out, that as quartz from 
the mine is now being treated, quartz tailings and waste products — 
except those that abound in auriferous pyrites — are not likely to give 
profitable results by any methods known at present. Nearly all the 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 8 75. 3 

old heaps will, however, well repay the miner if skill and economy be 
used. 

The quantity of washdirt puddled or sluiced during the year 1874 
has been computed at 1,037,345 tons, the yield of gold therefrom being 
54,725 oz. 18 dwts. 7 grs., or an average of 1 dwt. 6*76 grs. per ton. 

The quantity of cement crushed during the year 1874 is set down at 
85,010 tons, the yield of gold therefrom being 8789 oz. 9 dwts. 8 grs., 
or an avei'age of 5 dwts. 0*50 giu per ton. There is a decrease in the 
quantity treated in 1874, as compared with that ti-eated in 1873, of 
41,041 tons, and also a decrease in the yield of 6136 oz. 7 dwts. 22 grs. 

The number of miners employed in Victoria on the 3l8t of December, 
1874, was 45,151, of whom 32,971 were Euroj)eans and 12,180 Cliinese. 
The number of quaiiaz miners was 14,473, and the number of alluvial 
minei's was 30,678. 

The decrease in the mean number of miners employed duiing the year 
1874 as cotnpared with 1873 is 5545, and as compared with 1872 
8147. Referring to this decrease the Secretary for Mines states: — 
" The withdrawal of such large bodies of men from an occupation that 
on the whole gives good returns for the labour bestowed on it, is the 
cause of the great reduction in the produce of gold. While the average 
earnings per man per annum continue to increase, the numbers 
engaged in gold mining decrease, and if there were not great induce- 
ments held out to miners to abandon mining operations, the yield of 
gold, instead of falling off, would now be greater than in former years. 
The miners have now better machinery and better appliances for saving 
gold than they ever had, and yet they are leaving the mines in order to 
engage in other pursuits. During the past nine years there has been an 
increase of 33,523 in the number of persons engaged in farming, 
manufactories, (fee., and there has during the same period been a decrease 
of 27,065 in the number of gold miners." 

The total gold exported and minted during the year 1874 amounted 
to 1,155,971 oz. 19 dwts., and the value of this quantity divided 
amongst the mean number of miners employed throughout the year will 
give an average of £99 8s. 3'07d. per man. There has been no higher 
average than this during the past eighteen years, except in 1868, when 
the quantity of gold exported was 1,657,498 oz., and the average per 
man for the year was £104 18s. 8*75d. 

The gross weight of rough gold received at the Melbourne branch of 
the Royal Mint during 1874 was 29,391*54 oz., and the gross weight of 
gold bullion was 222,426*41 oz. The amount of gold exported during 
the year 1874, as returned by the Customs department, was 904,154 oz. 

The lowest price of gold per ounce for the quainter ending 31st 
December, 1874, was £3, and the highest during the same period was 
£4 3s. 

The lowest price charged per ton for crushing quartz and cement 
during the quaiter ending 31st December, 1874, was 2s., and the highest 
£1 88. 

The approximate value of all machinery and appliances in use on tJie 
several gold-fields for the year 1874 was £2,078,936. 

The number of gold-mining leases in force on the 31st of De- 

b2 



4 CATALOGUE OF THE 

cember, 1874, was 1996, and the extent of the ground leased was 
26,601a. Ir. 33|p. ; whUe the number of gold-mining leases issued in the 
year 1874 was 577, and the extent of the gix>und leased 9955a. Or. 16f p. 

The estimated value of claims and leased lands in the several mining 
districts on the 31st of December, 1874, was ^£7,424,024, and the 
revenue directly derived from the gold-fields during 1874, as compiled 
from the Treasury statements of revenue, (kc, amounted to £23,089 2s. 7d. 

Many of the quartz-mines are now worked at great depths ; and there 
is, as far as can be gathered from the returns, no diminution in the 
yield of gold in the deeper levels. There is one shaft at Stawell, 
Magdala mine, over 1600 feet in depth, one 1420 feet, one 1260, and 
two more than 1000 feet in depth. 

From the deeper levels in these mines the quartz has yielded as 
much as 3 oz. 9 dwts. 2 gi-s. per ton. 

At Clunes one shaft is 1012 feet deep, and another 1005 feet; at 
Sandliui-st one shaft is nearly 900 feet deep, and there are four exceeding 
800 feet, and one exceeding 700. The yield from these deep mines at 
Sandhui-st at the deepest levels vaiies fi'om 12 dwts.' 22 grs. per ton to 
1 oz. 2 dwts. 6 gi-s. per ton. 

SILVER. 

Tlie total amount of silver imsed in Victoria from ore is 12,468 oz., of 
which 180 oz. were raised in 1874. The total quantity of silver that 
has been obtained in Victoria is 36,625 oz. 15 dwts., of which 760 oz. 
was raised in 1874, and 11,146 oz. was exti'acted at the Mint. The 
total export of silver ore has been 10 oz. 6 dwts., and the total export 
of silver 16,368 oz. 6 dwts. 

The largest yield of silver during 1874 from one mine is 276 oz., 
representing a value of £69. This was obtained at Wilson's Hill in 
the St. Arnaud district. The next large yield was from Ciysolite Hill, 
St. Amaud, and was 68 oz., representing a value of £19. 

During 1874, as stated before, 11,146 oz. 5 dwts. of silver were 
extracted from gold at the Melbourne branch of the Royal Mint, which, 
at the cun-ent I'ate of 5s. per ounce, gives a money value of £2786 lis. 
The quantity of silver sold by the Mint during the same period was 
10,560*28, thiis leaving in the Mint 585*95 oz. not disposed of. About 
6000 oz. of Victorian silver found its way into the hands of the 
manufactiiring silvei'sniiths, and was used by them in the business of 
their trade, while about 3000 oz. were bought by those dealera who 
manufacture the ingredients used by photogi*aphei*s, of which silver is 
a component pai*t. 

There were three silver-mining leases in force at the end of 1874, 
covering an area of 380a. Ir. 17p.; two leases were issued over an area 
of 605a. 32p. 

IRON. 

Since the discovery of gold up to the 31st December, 1874, about 
182 tons of iron ore have been i*aised in Victoria, of which 130 tons 
were raised during the year 1874. Samples have been received, for 
analysis, of brown iron from Daylesford, brown ii'onstone frem Trand- 
gon Creek, Gippsland, and from Lake Tyera, Gippsland, mixed hematite 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 5 

and brown ii'on oi*e from Wilson's Promontory, and micaceous iron ore 
from the Gi-ampian Mountains, These oi'es contain from 26 to 72 per 
cent, of ii'on. The only experiment made duiing 1874 was with iron 
ore found at Limestone Gully, between Newstead and Sandy Creek. 
About half a ton of oi*e was smelted, and yielded 55 per cent, of iron. 
This is the iron of commerce, or grey iron, which, being soft and ductile, 
is suitable for the manufacture of castings, colur&ns, bronze and white- 
smith's work. It is estimated by those who have visited the two lodes 
that over 50,000 tons could be easily obtained for smelting. As yet no 
sufficient quantity of Victorian iron has been smelted to allow of the 
metal being used for manufactiu'ing purposes. English capitalists have 
however turned their attention to Victorian iron, and at theii* request 
have been furnished with samples of the various iron ores discovered in 
the colony, accompanied with a descrijition of the various localities and 
the distances of the deposits from railway communication with Mel- 
bourne. An extensive ii-on mine exists in the Ballarat district at Lal- 
Lal. Excavations have been made to prove the lode, a furnace has been 
ei'ected, and the machineiy is nearly completed. Beds have been made 
for the iron, buildings have been put up, and the owners of the mine 
expect shortly to commence active operations. 

During 1874 the number of men engaged in mining for iron was 27. 
One lease to mine for iron was in force on 31st December, 1874, extending 
over an area of about 46 acres, and another over an area of 320 acres. 
About 30 tons of red ochreous clay have, since March, 1874, been i*aised 
near Bendigo, and a quantity of the clay has been sent to England 
in oixier to ascertain the value of the prepared red ochre of commerce, 
and the value of the raw material in the English market. Infonnation 
respecting the nature and cost of the necessary and suitable machi- 
nery for manufactming the clay on the ground held under lease, and the 
iHilmg prices in the English, Continental and Indian markets, with 
statistics I'elative to home consumption, have been sought for. 

COPPER 

Previously to the 31st of December, 1873, about 1255 tons of copper 
ore were liaised in Victoria, and up to the same date 31 tons 10 cwt. 
were smelted, which at £112 per ton would give £3511. About 70 
tons of regulus brought £1969. 

During 1874 no copper ore was raised. Samples of copper ore from 
Snowy (>eek, Gippsland, from the ranges between Koetong and Bright, 
Ovens district, and from a locality only three miles from Melbourne have 
been subjected to analysis, and were found to contain from 25 to 90 per 
cent, of copper. During 1874 the number of men engaged in mining 
for copper was 21. 

One lease was in force at the end of 1874 to mine for copper ore over an 
ai'ea of 625 aci*es. 

TIN. 

The tin ore of Victoria promises to become a peimanent source of 
wealth to the colony. 



6 CATALOGUE OF THE 

The value of the tin ore raised up to the end of 1874 was estimated at 
£325,847. During 1874, 290 tons 2 cwt. of black sand, valued at 
£16,333, were raised, of which 112 tons were exported, 152 tons -were 
smelted in the colony, of which 49 tons 2 cwt. were shipped to England, 
and 103 tons 2 cwt. were consumed in Victoria. The smelting of Victorian 
tin is confined to the Ovens district, the principal smelters being the Wel- 
lington Co., El Dorado; W. G. Hensley, Reed's Creek; Ah Moy, Reed's 
Creek, and Tien Sing. The testimony of those trades that are accus- 
tomed to use tin plates preponderates in favour of the Victorian material. 
These plates are chiefly used for solder, the manufacture of which requii-es 
160 lbs. of the best English tin to every 100 lbs. of lead, while 100 lbs. of 
Victorian tin will take from 104 lbs. to 105 lbs. of lead. The wholesale 
dealers and the trade consumers praise the block-tin prepared by the 
Chinese smelters. One Melbourne firm of tinsmiths used during 1874 
about 22 tons Victorian tin in the manufacture of solder, which at the 
average price paid per lb. represents an outlay of £2420; another firm 
consumed about 20 tons, for which they paid from 9d. to Is. per lb. 

The Eldorado sand yields 73 per cent, of tin, the Ovens sand 30 to 71 
per cent., and the Koetong sand 65 to 72 per cent. 

Twelve leases to mine for tin were in force at the end of 1874, extend- 
ing over an area of 961 acres. Eight leases, extending over an area of 
234 acres, were issued during the same year, and 14 leases to search for 
tin, extending over an area of 1824 acres, were issued. It occurs both as 
stream and lode tin, but is mainly worked as the former at present. 

LEAD. 

Up to the end of 1874, the quantity of lead ore raised in Victoiia 
amounted to 518 tons, representing a money value of £4200, of which 
111 tons, valued at £1110, were raised during 1873. Up to the end of 
December, 1874, about 67 tons of lead ore have been exported. Experi- 
ments in smelting have not been successful. Early in 1874 a tidal 
smelting of two tons of lead from Murrindal, Gippsland, was made in 
Melbourne, and a yield of 60 per cent, of lead was obtained, the metal 
being valued at £22 10s. per ton. The cost of the transit of the ore 
from the mine, and the cost of treatment combined, left no margin, 
however, for profit, and further experiments were for the time abandoned. 
The owners of the Murrindal mine, after erecting a Spanish reverbera- 
tory furnace, and also a Flintshire furnace, found they could not over- 
come the difficulty of separating the lead from the sulphur and antimony 
which form component parts of the ore. A manager skilled in the treat- 
ment of lead ore has been sent for to England, and, as there are large 
quantities of the ore in the claim, the owners, on his arrival, hope to 
make the ore of marketable value. 

During 1864 six men were employed in the Murrindal and Buchan 
Mines. 

Two leases were in force to mine for lead at the end of 1874, over 605 
acres. 

Iron, Copper, Tin, and Lead, viewed as materials, will be more 
especially refeiTed to in Juries 17, 18, 19. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. ^ 

ANTIMONY. 

The total amotint of antimony ore that has been raised in the colony 
is 11,198 tons 4 cwt. 3 qrs. 9 lbs., representing a value of £80,870. Of 
this quantity 688 tons, valued at £4707, were raised during the year 
1874. The total amount exported is — antimony ore, 8061 tons 9 cwt.; 
antimony regulus, 602 tons 5 cwt. ; antimony, 430 tons 1 cwt. Of this 
quantity 224 tons 7 cwt. antimony ore, and 231 tons antimony regulus, 
were exported during the year 1874. Ore containing 60 per cent, of 
antimony brought, in London, from £12 to £12 15s. per ton, and 
star regulus maintained as high a price as £53 per ton. About 234 tons 
of antimony ore were treated in the colony during 1874. 

There are four antimony smelting works in Victoria, one of which 
employs steam power. The number of hands employed is 64. The 
value of the plant is estimated at £3900, that of the land £1150, and 
that of the buildings £2900. There is only one firm that does anything 
considerable in antimony smelting, and a great part of the ore treated 
by them is imported from Queensland, One of the smaller firms treated 
17 tons 10 cwt. of ore, consisting of mixed lots, in 1874. Another 
treated about 38 tons and obtained a yield of 22 tons of regulus, the 
market value of which was £42 per ton; and a third obtained from 60 
tons of ore about 20 tons of regulus. 

The localities in which the ore is principally raised are Ringwood and 
Costerfield. 

Sulphide of antimony from Ringwood yielded, upon analysis, 65 per 
cent, of antimony, and another sample 60 per cent. Sulphide of antimony 
fix)m Costerfield gave 45 per cent., and a sample from Whroo, on the 
Goulbum, 65 per cent. Sulphide of antimony from Sandhurst gave 63 
per cent. Oxide of antimony from Costerfield yielded 36 per cent., 
while a sample of sulphide of antimony with oxide, discovered 33 feet 
below the surface at Ringwood, yielded, when assayed, 68*46 of 
antimony. 

BISMUTH. 

A sample of nearly pure bismuth from Snowy Creek, Gippsland, was 
received for analysis in 1874. The outer portions of the sample were 
found to contain carbonate and oxide of bismuth, with ferruginous 
clay. It contained no gold or silver. One licence to search for bismuth 
over an area of 320 acres was issued during the year 1874. 

COAL. 
The total quantity of coal raised in Victoria is 5456 tons 8 cwt., 
valued at £8233. During 1874, about 2909 tons were raised, valued at 
£4363. Of this amount, 2879 tons were raised in the mine of the 
Western Port Coal Mining Company, and nearly the whole of the 
quantity raised was forwarded to Melbourne and disposed of at market 
prices. Five seams of coal, vaiying from 9 inches to 4 feet in thickness, 
were opened on a lease at Rosedale. At Griffith's Point the coal has not 
yet be^ reached, though the shaft has been sunk some 250 feet. In 
the mine of th^ Kilcunda Association, a shaft about 250 feet deep 
has penetrated through clay, blue sandstone, and small riders of ooeJ, 
half an inch to three inches in width. 



8 CATALOGUE OF THE 

Several parties have been prospecting for coal in Oippsland, and good, 
indications have, it is said, been found on the La Trobe Biver. 

It was reported that what was described as a valuable seam of coal 
had been discovered at Lang Lang, South Gippsland. The coal deposit 
is about seven miles from the proposed Gippsland railway line, and is 
sixty-five miles from Melbourne. The seam at Lang Lang is stated to 
be about two feet thick at a very short distance from the outcrop. 
Towards the end of 1874, a landslip in the Wannon Valley exposed the 
lay of the strata. Some ten feet from the surface there cropped out 
what appeared to be a seam of coal four feet in thickness. The mineral 
was found to bum with a smouldering heat like peat. 

There were eighteen leases in force at the end of 1864, extending over 
an area of 9412 acres; two leases to mine for coal, extending over 1280 
acres, and twenty-one leases to search for coal, over an area of 11,363 
acres, were issued during 1874. 

LIGNITE. 

The total quantity of lignite raised is 3500 tons, representing a value 
of £2120. In 1874, 750 tons were raised, which, being valued at 5s. 
per ton, realised £187. The lignite is found to answer well as fuel for 
steam engines, it throws out a good heat, and is economical. One reason 
that it does not find more favour with those in charge of engines is that, 
although the hard work at intervals when using coal as fuel is not 
required, the furnaces need more continuous attention being paid to them. 
When the lignite is compressed into bricks, as is done in Germany, 
where it is extensively used, it can be used with very little trouble. The 
owners of the mine intend importing machinery for compressing the 
lignite into bricks. The principal places of occurrence are Lai Lai, neai* 
Ballarat, and Cross-over Ci-eek, near the line of railway to Gippsland. 
The former bed is said to be about 120 feet in thickness, and that at 
Cross-over 80 feet. 

The mines of silver, tin, copper, lead, antimony, iron, coal, and lignite 
give employment to 388 miners. 

CLAYS. 

The total amount of kaolin i*aised in Victoria is estimated at 1832 
tons, representing a money value of £7444, twenty-five tons of which 
have been exported. No kaolin was raised in 1874. 

There are in Victoria 296 brickyards and potteries, in which 1271 
hands are employed. The number of macliines used are, for tempering 
or crushing the clay 184, for making bricks or pottery 77. The approxi- 
mate total value of the bricks is j^l 64,266; pottery £24,822; machineiy 
and plant £45,785; buildings £53,858, and the land used in connection 
with this industiy £52,251. The number of bricks made in 1874 vf-as 
83,337,000. The geneml average of the working hours is nine, and the 
value of the goods produced duiing the year 1874 may be set down at 
£71,158. Wages average for men £2 2s. jjer week; boys, from 6s. to 
£L 



INT£RCX)LONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 9 

The laigest brick manufactory employs 100 handsy and the wholesale 
▼alae of manufactures prodaoed in 1874 was £30,000. 

Another manufactory for bricks and tiles gives employment to 22 
hands, whose average hours of work are eight. The value of the manu- 
factures produced in 1874 was £6500. 

The largest pottery and drain pipe manufactory gives employment to 
25 hands, who work eight hours a day. The wholesale value of the 
manufactories in 1874 amounted to £10,000. 

A manufactory of pottery and glazed pipes employs 31 hands, who 
work nine hours per day. The wholesale value of the manufactures in 
1874 was £5000. 

The largest manufactory for drain pipes alone employs 11 hands, 
and the wholesale value of its manufactures in 1874 was £5200. 

For pottery, stone-ware and terra-cotta the largest works give employ- 
ment to 13 hands, the working hours being eight per day. The whole- 
sale value of the manufactures in 1874 was £4000. 

There is one factory of red wai-e, the wholesale value of the goods 
produced in 1874 being ^^1560. 

A sample of black shale found at Ballarat has been analysed. It 
somewhat resembles plumbago. Upon being heated in an ordinary flame 
the carbon in the shale bums readily, leaving a voluminous white ash 
which fuses at a high temperature. The softer pai-ts of the shale might 
be used for the manufactures of crayons, or perhaps soft pencils. 

CEMENT. 

There are in Victoria two establishments for the manufacture of 
cement, one of which uses steam to the extent of 60 hoi'se power. 
Thirty-four males and one female are employed, and the value of the 
machinery and plant is £5300. 

LIMESTONE. 

The limestone found at Limebumer's Point and the Duck Ponds, near 
Geelong, gives employment to 27 limekilns, in which 182 hands ai'e 
employed. The machineiy and plant is valued at £4027, the land £2122, 
and the buildings at £1755. 

The most extensive of these kilns gives employment to 50 men, who 
work from eight to ten hours a day ; the value of the lime manufactiu*ed 
in 1874 was £10,000. Another employs 13 men, working ten houi^s a day, 
the value of the lime produced in 1 874 being £1 633. A third employs ten 
men, working ten hours a day, and the value of the lime manufactui-ed in 
1874 was £160. During 1874 eight to ten tons of limestone found near 
Moorabool have been used. It is valued at from 35s. to 408. per ton, 
and is admirably suited for the manu£EU3ture of filters. Several hundred 
tons of Waum Ponds limestone were used for building purposes. It is 
found to resist climatic efiects, and to harden by exposui'e to the air. Its 
price is from 35s. to 40s. per ton. 

FLAGGING AND SLATE. 

The total value of the flagging hitherto raised in Victoria is £35,629. 
In 1874 the quantity of flagging raised was 1961 tons, valued at £2941. 



10 CATALOGUE OP THE 

Nearly all the flagging comes from Castlemaine and its neighbourhood, 
and is suitable for monumental purposes, hearthstones, footpaths, and 
coreing. 

MARBLE. 

A discovery of a superior marble has been made at Waratah Bay, 
commencing just north of the Bird Rock, about 4 J miles to the north of 
Cape Liptrap. In lateral extent the outcrop is rather limited, bein^ 
confined to the steep face of the shore escarpment, that is, from high 
water mark for about 4 chains west, up to near the top of the escarp- 
ment, where a ^ferruginous sandstone, as it seems, conformably overlies 
it. North, beyond the cliff, succeed bluish gray shales and thinly- 
bedded sandstones. In the south the marble appears to be suddenly cut 
off by a broad dyke of an intrusive rock, which at the surface disinte- 
grates to a highly ferruginous soil, interspei'sed with occasional lumps of 
a very fine brown iron oi*e. Its texture is crystalline-granular, varying 
from fine to coarse grained, and it assumes in places (more especially at 
the base of the bluff), the character of black and white mottled and veined 
marble, suitable for chimney-pieces and other ornamental building work. 
A company is in course of formation to work this valuable deposit. 

There are 1 7 marble and stone works in Victoria, giving employ- 
ment to 126 hands. The value of the total plant is £3275; of the land, 
£14,195; and of the buildings, £3145. The largest marble and stone 
works employ 20 hands, workmg eight hours a day; the wholesale value 
of the manufactures in 1874 was £6000. Another employs 15 hands; 
the hours of work are eight hours per day, and the wholesale value of 
the work turned out in 1874 was £2200. 

A manufactory at which the chief work is of a monumental character 
gives employment to 15 men, who work eight hours a day. The whole- 
sale value of the manufactures in 1874 was £5000. 

An establishment for enamelling slate mantelpieces gives employment 
to 16 hands, working eight hours per day. The wholesale value of the 
work done in 1874 was £1500. 

There are three stone-breaking works, which find employment for 90 
hands. The total value of the plant is £6500; of the land, £200; and 
of the buildings, £700. 

There are six establishments at which stone-sawing and polishing 
are carried on, in four of which steam-power is used. Employment is 
given to 139 hands. The total value of the plant is £13,800; of the 
land, £6100; of the buildings, £5400. 

One establishment for polishing granite and bluestone employs 19 
hands, and the value of the work turned out in 1874 was £3100. 

Marbles at present unworked, but suitable for ornamental purposes, 
are foimd at lilydale and Yering, on the Yarra ; at Mansfield and at 
Creelong. A very fine shell marble occurs near Maude, in the Moora- 
bool valley. The largest deposits of limestone in Victoria are foimd in 
Gippsland, at Buchan and Bindi, covering many square miles of 
country. They are of Devonian age, of a dense crystalline character, 
and nearly black colour. The lead lodes of Buchan and Murrindal occur 
in these rocks. 



1KTERCX>L0NIAL EXHIBITION, l87S* 1^ 

GLASS. 

During the last few years the manu&ctiire of glass has been gi'adiiallj 
developing into a permanent industry, and it could have become still 
more extended in its operations were it not for the difficulty of obtaining 
skilled workmen, who all, until lately, had to be imported from Eiuope. 
Under the head of glass manu&ctories are included flint glass, looking 
glass, and glass bottles. There are in Victoria five factories, three for 
flint glass and two for the manufacture of looking glass, and the aggi^e- 
gate number of hands employed is 87. The total value of goods pi'O- 
duced during the year 1874 was £25,400. Tlie wages of glass-blowers 
average £4 per week; labourers, £2 10s.; and boys from 6s. to 15& The 
hours of work vary from eight to nine hours per day. 

The largest factory for glass bottles employs 29 men and 14 boys, and 
the wholesale value of the goods produced in 1874 amounted to about 
£10,400. 

The largest flint glass manufactory gives employment to 21 hands, 
viz., 9 men and 12 boys. During the year 1874 the wholesale value oif 
the goods produced was £2000. 

The most prominent of the looking glass factories gives employment 
to 10 men, who earn on an average £3 per week each. The wholesale 
value of the goods produced in 1874 amounted to £10,000. 

INFUSORIAL EARTH. 

Attention has been turned to infusorial earth, in the Amherst district 
of the Maryborough Mining Division, of a most superior quality, and 
it has also been found at Sailor's Creek, Sebastopol, and Spring Plains. 

DIAMONDS. 

The total number of diamonds foimd in Yictoiia is 104, valued at 
£1 each, four of which were found in 1874. 

SAPPHIRES, ZIRCONS, GARNETS, TOPAZ. 

These stones are principally foimd at Eldorado, the Woolfihed, and Pilot 
Oi-eek in the Beech worth district. During the year 1874, the following 
Victorian gem stones were cut by Messrs. Spink and Son, Melbourne : — 
Sapphires, fi-om Beechworth and Gippsland, 12; Rubies, from Gippsland, 
12; Topazes, fix)m Beechworth and Gippsland, 100; Zircons, 40; Mala- 
chite, from Gippsland, 20; Garnets, 6; Agates, 30; Crystallized 
Quartz, 200. 



Group 1. 

ACADIA CATHERINE G. M. CO., Eaglehawk, Sandhuret ; G. W. 

Froggatt, Manager. 

Gold-bearing Quartz, from Acadia Catherine G. M. Co. 

ADET, EDWARD, 21 3Iarket^iti-eet, Melbourne. 
2 Specimen Minerals, from New Caledonia. 



13 CATALOGUE OP THB 

# 

BALLAN SHIRE COUNCIL ; R. H. Young, Secretary. 
3 Block of Stone. 

BRIGHT BROS. & CO., Little FHnders-street West, Melbourne. 

5 Star Antimony, various-sized Plates. 

6 Crucibles. 

BROWNE, THOMAS, West Maitland, New South Wales. 

7 Sandstone, fine-gi-ained, from Ravensfield Quarries, West 

Maitland. 

CAMPBELL, EDWARD, Womsted, Cook's River, N.S.W. 

7a Coal from Rix's Creek Shaft, open — No. 1, 4 feet seam; No. 2, 
14 feet seam; No. 3, 14 feet seam; No. 4, 14 feet seam. 
To be presented to the Melbourne Museum. 

7b Iron Ore from Rix's Creek. To be presented to the Melbourne 
Museum. 

COMPOSITION ASPHALTE COMPANY, Johnston-street, 

Collingwood. 

8 Footpath of Composition Asphalte. 

COSTERFIELD GOLD AND ANTIMONY M. CO. ; Thomas Lang, 
Legal Manager, 52 Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

9 Antimony Ore. 

10 Sulphide of Antimony. 

11 Refined Sulphide of Antimony. 

12 Crude Antimony of commerce. 

13 Oxide of Antimony. 

14 Pure Regulus of Antimony, reduced from the Oxide by M. 

Henri Herrenschmidt, in his patent furnace erected at 
Costerfield. 

DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Sydney, New South Wales. 

15 Section A, showing Strata and Seams of Coal, Upper Coal 

Measures of New South Wales, with accompanying Map of 
Coal-field, by J. Mackenzie, Esq., F.G.S., Examiner of Coal- 
fields. 

16 Section B, of Seams of Coal, taken at each of the collieries of 

New South Wales. 

17 Section C, natural size of the Seams of Coal now worked in 

each of the coal mining districts of New South Wales. 

18 Section D, natural size of the Seams of Petroleum Oil, Cannel 

Coal (kerosene shale) opened in New South Wales. 

DRYSDALE, J. (of Drysdale & Fi-azer) and WILLIAM MITCHELL, 

King-street, and 78 Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

19 Iron Ore, and Pig Iron smelted from same. 

FINN, QUINN & CO., Dowling-street, Sandhurst 
•20 Polished Granite from Quarries at Harcourt and Heathcote. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 13 

FINNEY, W., & CO., 1 Bond-street, Melbourne. 

21 Coal from the New Wallsend Collieries at Catherine Hill Bay, 
New South Wales. 

FLATOW, JOSEPH, 26 Capel-streetj Hotham. 
S2 Pyramid formed of Minerals, under glass shade. 

FORBES, WILLIAM, Briagolong, Gippsland. 

23 Block of Freestone, from Briagolong, Gippsland. 

FOUNTAIN, JOHN, Brisbane Water, New South Wales. 

24 Iron Ore, from Brisbane Water; ascertained depth of deposit, 

22ft.; area, 900 acres. 

HANCKAR, J. L. H., 52 Bourke-street East, Melbourne. 

25 Block of Nickel Oi-e, from the Boa Kaine Mine, New Caledonia. 

HODGSON, RICHARD, Noon-street, CoUingwood. 

26 Blocks of Star Antimony. 

27 Pigs of Lead. 

28 Blocks of Tin, all smelted in tlie colony. 

HUXLEY, PARKER & CO., Russell-street, Melbourne. 

29 Grey Gitinite Monolith, on base of same kind of stone, from 

quanies at Mount Alexander. 

LEYI, NATHANIEL, 34 Collins-street West, Melbourne. 

30 Coal, from Cape Patterson. 

MANSFIELD SHIRE COUNCIL, Mansfield ; J. H. Hayman, Sec. 

31 Slabs of Polished Marble. 

32 Hewn Sandstone. 

33 Ashlai* of Hewn White Sandstone, from quarry at Mansfield; 

easy to work, and hai*dens after exposure to the atmosphere. 

34 Polished Marble, from a quarry at Loyola, in the Shire of 

Mansfield. 
36 Slab of Polished Marble, from the Mansfield Marble and Lime- 
stone Quarries. 

MOORE & CO., 104 Boiu-ke-street west, Melbomne. 

36 Mill Stones. 

M'CTJLLTJM, ARGYLE, Good Hope, Yass, New South Wales. 

37 Copper and Lead Ore from Woolgarlo Mine. 

MACEIERRAS, JAMES T., Dunedin ; Agent, P. Langwill, 3 Flinders- 
street East, Melbom-ne. 

38 Slate, from Province of Otago, New Zealand. 



14 CATALOGUE OF THE 

M'KENZIE, LEWIS, liUcur, Amier^t 

39 Infusoiial EartL 

NEW SOUTH WALES SHALE AND OIL CO., Sydney, l^ew 

Soath Wales. 

40 Kerosene Shale, with products there&om, viz., Kerosene Oil, <S:c. 

PREIST, THOMPSON, Mintaro, South Australia. 
42 Slate from Mintaro, South Australia. 

SHENANDOAH GOLD MINING COMPANY, Sandhurst; J. G. 

Weddell, Legal Manager. 

44 Grold-beaiing Quartz from stope at the 390 feet level. Reef, 

7 feet wide. 

STEATFORD, T. H., Adelaide, South Austi-alia. 

45 Specimens of €k)ld and Copper. 
45a Specimens of Gold and Bismuth. 

TAYLOR, JAMES, Steam Granite Polishing Works, Mitchell-sti-eet 

Sandhurst 

47 Polished Granite Doric Columns, about 12 feet high. 

48 Polished Granite Monument. 

49 Small Polished Columns. 

50 Specimens of Colonial and other Granite. 

TAYLOR, JAMES, Mitchell-street, Sandhurst. 

51 Polished Granite Columns. 

VICTORIA IRON ROLLING CO., Dudley and Franklin streets, 

Melbourne. 

53 Manufactures of Bar Iron and Forgings. 

WILSON, CORBEN & CO., Lonsdale-street East, Melbourne. 

54 Specimens of Castlemaine Slate in the rough state, and enamelled. 

55 Castlemaine Paving Stone. 

WALLACE, JOHN A., 52 Bourke-sti-eet East, Melbourne. 

56 Block of Nickel Silver, extracted by H. Hen*enschmidt, Esq., at 

the Costei-field Smelting Works, from Nickel Ore of the Boa 
Kaine and Mammoth Mines, New Caledonia. 



Group 2. 

DRYSDALE, J. (of Diysdale & Frazer), and WILLIAM MITCHELL, 
King-street, and 78 Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

57 Lime found adjoining Iron Lodes, assay 55 per cent, of iron, 
from Castlemaine district, Victoria. 



IKTBRCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 1^ 

McGOMAS, 49 King^tKeet^ Melbourne. 
57a Freestone &om Oamam, New Zealand. 

MURRAY, JOHN, Wills^sU-eet, BaUai-at 

57b Face of Culverty drde upon circle, wing waUs, with ramp and 
twist coping. 

BALDOCK, F. and BL, Sydney, New South Wales. 

59a Squat Jars, with covers. 
59b Bung Jars. 
59c Bottles. 
59d Chums. 
59E Bread Pans. 



Group 3. 

ADAMS, R. T., Princes Bridge, Melbourne. 

58 Stoneware. 

AUSTIN, JOHN H., Bininswick-road, Brunswick. 

59 Glazed Earthenware Drain Pipes. 

BARNINGHAM & LACEY, Barkly-street, Brunswick. 

60 Red Building Bricks. 

61 White-pressed and Moulded Bricks. 

CAWKWELL, HENRY ATKINSON, High-street, Malvern. 

62 Geometrical and Roman Mosaics. 

63 Encaustic Tile Pavements. 
^4 Flooring Tiles. 

65 Fire-proof Flooring. 

66 Trusses. 

67 Vases and Garden Edgings. 

68 Gutter Tiles. 

69 Gutter Bricks. 

70 Agricultural Drain PipeSi 

CORNWELL, ALFRED, Brunswick. 

71 Earthenware Pipes. 

72 ' Earthenware Chimney Pots. 

73 Earthenware Fancy Articles. 

74 Earthenware Vases. 

75 Stoneware. 

76 Terra Cotta Goods. 



16 CATALOGUE OF THE 

GUTHRIE, G. D., Epsom, Sandhurst. 

77 Collection of Potteryware, consisting of Cane, Bockingliam, 

Bi^wnware, Gitinite, &c. 

HARRIS, FRANK A., Jun., Heidelberg-road, North Fitzroy. 

78 Red and Glazed Potteryware. 

HOFFMAN PATENT STEAM BRICK CO., Bnmswick ; Abm. 

Collings, Manager. 

79 Machine-made Building and Paving Bricks. 

80 Machine-made Bricks, taken out of a wet clay foundation, after 

four years* time. 

81 Machine-made Brunswick Fii-e Bricks. 

82 Hand-made „ „ „ 

83 Chimney-bricks and Coping Bricks. 

84 Two Tiers and Flat Arch, unsupported, built in cement in 1872. 

85 Patent Cement Grooved Bricks, for cement work. Crouch and 

Wilson's patent, built in same on the above arch. 

86 Building Bricks, without mortar or cement ; continuation of the 

tiers. 
86a Small Tier of Chimney Bricks, square outside, cii'cular inside. 

KNIGHT, JAMES, & CO., Lai Lai, near Ballarat. 

87 Sunderland Stoneware. 

88 Rockingham Stoneware. 

89 Malting Tiles. 

NOLAN, LUKE, Gillbrook Potteiy, Brunswick. 

90 Stoneware Draining Pipes. 

91 Ornamental Terra Cotta Vases. 

92 Bronze Vases. 

93 Stone Filters. 

94 Stone Pickling Jara. 

95 Stone Preserving Jars. 

96 Stone Porous Jugs. 

97 Figiu'ed Stoneware Jugs. 
97a Patent Damp-proof Courae. 

NORTHCOTE PATENT BRICK CO., Northcote; office, 45 William 

street, Melbourne. 

98 Bricks. 

SPEARING, W., Hindmarsh, South Australia. 

99 Pottery. 

100 Stone Goods. 

101 Eai-thenware Tiles. 

102 Earthenware Pipes. 

103 Fire and other Bricks. 

104 Drain Paving Tiles. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 17 

105 Safe Stands. 

106 Water Coolers. 

107 Air Biicks. 

108 Garden Edging. 

WILSON, J. S., Footscray Pottery, Footscray. 
(Colonial Manufacture.) 

110 Chesterfield Pottery Warn 

111 Rockingham Pottery Wai*e. 

112 White Glazed Eai-thenwai-e. 

WOLSTENCROFT, JOHN & WILLIAM, Miller-street, Back 

• Creek, Sandhurat. 

113 Ornamental Red and White Patent-pressed Brick Mouldings and 

Clays. 

114 Red and White Flooring Tiles, of six and nine inches square. 

115 Ornamental Tiles. 

116 Ornamental Red and White Arch Bricks. 

117 Common Bricks, all made from ground clay. 



Group 4. 

LYON, COTTIER & CO., Sydney, New South Wales. 

119 Stained Glass Staiixjase Window. Subject — " Captain Cook." 

FERGUSON & URIE, 10 Collins-street East, Melbourne. 

120 Staircase on wall Window, " The Seasons." 
Staircase on wall Window, " Rob Roy." 

Portion of Staircase Window for Mr. Clarke's mansion, Sunbury. 
Embossed Plate Glass for do. " Chillingworth Wild Cattle." 

121 " The Maries at the Tomb," ** T he Charge to Peter," Samples of 

Margins. 

HOPE, JAMES, 48 Collins-street East, Melbourne. 

122 English Table Glass. 

MELBOURNE GLASS BOTTLE WORKS COMPANY, 

Beach, Emerald Hill. 

123 Glass Bottles. 

c 



IS CATALOGUE OF THE 



DEPARTMENT 2. 

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS USED CHIEFLY 
AS FOOD, ARBORICULTURE, FLORICULTURE, 
AND WOODS. 



EXPERTS. 



Hon. Wm. Bayles, M.P. 
John Carson, Esq. 
C. F. Creswell, Esq. 



J. L. Dow, Esq. 
T. J. Laby, Esq. 
Abraham Lincolne, Esq. 



Thomas Lang, Esq. 
Matthew M*Caw, Esq. 
John Sharp, Esq. 



The total quantity of land in Victoria alienated* from the Crown up to the 
year ending March Slst, 1875, reached 9,153,168 acres, or nearly one- 
sixth of the national estate of 65,440,000 acres. Of this quantity the 
land under tillage at the same date was 1 ,011,799 acres, or rather more than 
an acre and a quarter for each man, woman, and child in the colony, the 
total population at the date mentioned being 802,941. This proportion 
it is found compares favourably with the tillage operations of other 
countries. In Great Britain, with a population of 26,000,000, the area 
under crop is 18,000,000 acres; in France with 36,000,000 souls, the 
area is 49,000,000 ; in Belgium, with 5,000,000, about 4,000,000 ai-e 
cultivated, so that the proportion of cultivated land in the colony is 
larger than in the mother-country, and as large as in France, Belgium, 
or any of the principal agricultural countiies on the Continent of Europe. 
The gradu-^l progress of settlement is shown by the fact that in 1871 
the increase in the acreage cultivated was 28,205 acres; in 1872, 25,871 
acres; in 1873, 1905 acres; and in 1874, 46,803 acres. The large 
increase in the latter year is attributable to the great quantity of fi'ee 
selection of land in newly opened districts, under the provisions of what 
is known as the Land Act of 1869. Under this Act the facilities for 
bona fide settlement have been very much increased as compared with 
former measures, the total number of holdings exceeding one acre in 
extent in the colony was at the date given 38,469, showing an increase 
in the number of landholders compared with the previous year of 1867. 
With reference to the system of agi'iculture pui*sued there has been a 
steady improvement going on within the last few years, and instead of 
the system of growing cereal crops from the same land year after year 
without change, a more intelligent coui-se of practice is being introduced. 
In the majority of the older settled districts the keeping of stock, 
chiefly well-bred Lincoln sheep on artificial pastures, is being combined 
with a rotation of crops, so that not only is gi'eater ceiiiainty of yield 
ensured, but also the soil is being refertilised by the adoption of the 
new system, and the farmer's returns inci-eased. The progi-ess being made 
in this direction is noticeable by the fact that of the area named, wheat for 
the year 1875 covered 332,935 acres, producing 4,850,136 bushels. The 
next crop in importance, oats, occupied 114,921 acres, yielding 2,121,612 
bushels, while barley to the extent of 29,505 acres was cultivated, yielding 



INTBRGOI^ONIAL EXHIBITION, T875. 19 

a total of 619,896 bushels. Haj, chiefly from oats and wheat cut before 
ripeniog, occupied 119,120 acres, producing 157,336 tons; and potatoes, 
for which some of the agricultui'al distiicts, notably Waimambool, Lance- 
field, and Bullarook, ai-e specially adapted, occupied 35,179 acres, yielding 
124,299 tons. 

The extent to which pastui-e is being combined with tillage operations 
is marked by the large item of 238,018 acres being under artificial grasses, 
depasturing along with other resources of the farms 5,398,013 sheep, 
216,398 milch cows, 506,135 other cattle for fattening and other purposes, 
and 722,533 hoi-ses. On the total farms thei-e wei-e employed on 31st 
March, 1875, 56,581 male and 25,420 female servants, assisted by agricul- 
tural machinery to the value of £1,462,460. Of the artificial pastui^e 
seeds used rye-grass occupies the fii-st place in point of quantity, a mixtui*e 
of rye-grass and red or white clover comes next, followed by lucerne, while 
a mixture of rye-grass, clover, cow-grass, prairie, rib, and other pastiu*e 
grasses are used to a lai'ge extent Amongst cix)ps that are receiving an 
increased amount of attention from year to year are maize, for which a 
large area of newly taken up land in the western and northern dis- 
tricts is extremely well adapted; and peas, by which latter crop 16,161 
acres were covered up to the date already mentioned. This crop is 
growing in favour with agriculturists as a cleaner of foul land, while its 
effects as a refertilising rotation preceding a cereal crop are very marked. 
Turnips, mangel-wurzel, beet, and carrots are also grown to an increasing 
extent annually as cattle food, while rape and other similar crops are 
grown for sheep feed and for gi*een manuxing. The cultivation of 
turnips was for many yeai*s much retarded by the aphis blight; but that 
weed having disappeared, the cultivation of the turnip has been resumed 
with advantage. 

During the year ending 31st March, 1875, 5,371,866 bushels of 
wheat and 233,150 bushels of other kinds of grain have passed thx'ough 
the hopper in Victoria. Four hundred and eighty-five pau-s of stones 
have pulverised this mass, and engines representing strength to the 
amount of 2835 horse-power have been employed to work the machinery 
in 149 mills. In all, Victoria possesses 161 grain mills, and twelve of 
them use water as a motive power. These mills have turned out during 
the year 114,929 tons of flour, and 2664 tons of meal. The manufac- 
tui-e of starch, farina, and maizena is still in its infancy; the value of 
the colonial-made article is consequently tiifling. At the close of the 
financial year 1874, 349,976 aci-es of Victorian soil wei-e beaiing wheat, 
25,333 acres were sown with barley, and 112,950 acres were yielding 
cix)ps of oats and maize. The farms set apart as gi*ain and vegetable 
producing lands gave employment, during the year 1874, to 82,000 
])eople, and the rate of wages amongst farm hands may be estimated as 
follows : — Ploughmen may earn, as a rule, from £1 to £1 5s. per week ; 
ordinaiy labourers from 15s. to £1, and mowei-s from £1 to £1 10s. 
Reapere avei*age a trifle higher than mowei's, inasmuch as they can earn on 
an average 1 3s. 4d. per diem for reaping an acre, whilst scythe men can 
only obtain 5s. 6d. for mowing an acre of grass. Threshers' wages avei*age 
6cL per each bushel threshed. At the present average price of wheat per 
bushel (which fluctuates at from 5s. to 5s. 7d.) Victoria is realising i^er 

c2 



20 CATALOGUE OP THE 

annum, by her wheat alone, about XI, 500,000, and by other sorts of 
grain £580,000. In the grain mills of the colony 749 persons are employed, 
and skilled workmen are paid, as a rule, from £2 to £2 10s. per week. 
First-class skilled hands can earn as much as £4 per week, but to do so 
they must be quite mastera of their tirade. Whilst on the subject of 
wages, it must not be understood that those quoted constitute the whole 
resource upon which an agricultural labourer has to fall back as a 
means of subsistence, because on farms and stations, working hands are 
provided with rations to a fairly liberal extent.' Meat is served out 
without stint, and other articles of food are provided as circumstances 
admit. 

Amongst crops that have only of late years received attention, but 
which ai*e found to be eminently suited for a large portion of the colony, 
may be mentioned tobacco and flax, and these products bid fair, as their 
management becomes better understood, to assume important proportions 
in the agiiculture of the colony. The area under vines has not increased 
to the extent that might have been expected, considering the very wide 
extent of soil adapted for viticulture in situations affording eveiything 
in the way of suitable climate and other requisite conditions. For the 
year ending March 31st, 1875, the returns give 4937 acres under 
vines, the vintage showing a yield of 699,093 gallons of wine, while 
grapes not made into wine are i^etumed at 19,999 tons, and gi*apes made 
into brandy yielded 90,988 gallons. The great capabilities of the colony 
as a producer of high-class wines — as demonstrated at the Vienna Exhi- 
bition — cannot fail, however, to exercise a most beneficial effect in giving 
to this important branch of agriculture a very decided impetus. The 
attention being devoted to the formation of gardens and orchards is 
shown by the fact that the number of acres under the former for 1875 
amounts to 11,882 acres, and the latter 6317 acres, or a total inci-ease 
on the previous year of 3000 acres. The number, variety, and excel- 
lence of the arboricultural and floricultural products of the colony are 
exemplified annually at the shows held in connection with the numerous 
agricultural societies throughout the colony. 

The indigenous timber trees of Victoria occupy a very large propoi-tion 
of the whole colony. Tliey are usually dense and of fine growth in 
those mountainous districts which possess a copious and i^egular rainfall ; 
but in the drier parts of the country, such as the immense ])lains of the 
northern districts bordering the Murray, where the rainfall is small, and 
the droughts of the summer seasons often excessive, they are compara- 
tively small. 

The amount of rainfall varies very much in different parts of Victoria. 
Along the Great Dividing Range it is most regular and abundant ; we 
have no records of the quantity of rain that is precipitated annually in 
this belt of country; but from observations taken in other parts of the 
colony possessing a large rainfall, and not so favourably situated, it may 
be estimated at from thirty-five to forty-five inches per annum. In the 
country lying between the Great Dividing Range and the seaboard it is 
found from observations taken at Ballarat, Camperdown, Portland, Mel- 
bourne, and Port Albeii;, that the average rainfall varies from twenty- 
six to thirty-two inches per annum, according to locality. In the tract 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 8 75. 21 

of country from the north side of the Great Dividing Kange to the 
River Miuray it is, however, much less; and, from observations taken 
at Castlemaine, Heathcote, Sandhurst, and Echuca, it appears to vary 
from seventeen to twenty-eight inches per annum; but it is probable 
that in the diy Mallee country of the exti*eme north-west districts, the 
fall of rain does not usually exceed ten or twelve inches per annum. 

The growth of timber appears to be much affected by these vai'iations 
of climate; and although many kinds of forest trees of the same, or 
nearly the same varieties, are found indifferently in nearly all jmrts of 
Victoria, they ai*e of much the largest and thickest growth in localities 
possessing the most regular rainfall : this seems to be one of the condi- 
tions necessary for their finest development. Great difference of opinion 
exists as to the wisdom of the com^e pursued in linging, or stripping 
bark from trees. There can be no doubt that the quality of the grass is 
much improved, but it is feared that the rainfall will be diminished. 

The forests of the colony liave suffered to a lai'ge extent from an 
indiscriminate felling of the timber for mining and fencing purposes, 
while no provision has been made for their reproduction. Latterly, 
however, this matter haa received the attention of the Government, 
and steps are being taken in the direction of forest conservancy, with 
the view of remedying as far as possible the mistakes of the past, and 
making provision for the future. 

In connection with the Government scheme for forest consei-vancy. 
State Foi'ests have been established in vaiious parts of the colony, and 
in some of these nurseries are being prepared for the introduction of 
trees from other countries, with a view to their being acclimatised in the 
colony. One of these has been established on the top of Mount Macedon, 
about 3000 feet above the level of the sea. Here have been established 
a large mmiber of imported varieties of timber, deciduous and evergi'een, 
comprising iheFimcs itisignis, Cedrus Deoda^a, Finua (Abies) Webbana, 
Pinus WeUhigUmia Sequma gigantea, Pinua (Abies) Douglasii, Pinus 
(Abies) nim'inda, Pinus tid>erculata, Pinvs alba, Califomian Red 
' Wood, Chestnuts, Elm, Bu*ch, Beech, and a large collection of English 
Oaks and varieties of the Ash. Seedlings of these and other woods 
are raised without the assistance of fi*ames or pots, and afterwards 
planted out at the intervals of about twelve feet in the other poi-tions of 
the new forests. 

WOOD. 

In considering timber in its relation to the industrial resources of a 
country, as illustrated by an Exhibition like the present, our attention 
must be directed and confined to two great subdivisions — firstly, the 
woods which are indigenous to the Colony; and secondly, those which 
we are constantly in the habit of importing, in consequence of our 
having no convenient or suitable local equivalents. 

By far the largest proportion of our native timber is the production 
of one or the other varieties of the JSttcalypttiSy as must be obvious 
when it is remembered that four-fifths of our native trees belong to 
the genus, which is represented in this colony alone by no less than 
twenty-seven different varieties. The Eucalyptus grows to immense 



22 CATALOOUB OF THE 

fiize. There are many trees within a short distance of Melbourne of 
lai*ger size than the mammoth trees of California. 

The most valuable of these is, without doubt, the Redgum, Eucalyptus 
rostrata. This is a hard dense wood, with a handsome, curly, but rather 
short gi'ain. It is almost entirely fi'ee from the tendency to longitudinal 
shrinkage, which is the invariable characteristic of all the other varieties 
of the Eucalyptus, and is almost indestructible in damp ground or in 
water, either fresh or salt. Its defects are its short grain, which makes 
it untrustworthy for horizontal bearing timbers in any but very short 
lengths; and it caimot easily be procured in long lengths and of a 
moderately small diameter, a point of some importance in piles, 'whei'e 
it is desii-able to have the whole section of the tree with its waning 
intact. Still, within a reasonable limit of length, it makes the best of 
all piles for engineeiing works, in consequence of the resistance it affords 
to the attacks of the teredo navalis; and it cannot be surpassed for any 
purposes, either in engineering or building, where a resistance to sheer 
downward pressure is desired. It makes unequalled planking for bridges, 
or wharves, and none but redgum sleepers are considered fii-st-class. 
Redgum posts, although rough, from the difficulty of splitting the 
timber, will last almost twice as long as those of any other native wood; 
and for the felloes of heavy wheels it is in much request. In 
the fonn of firewood thousands of tons are annually consumed, as 
it fonns a desirable wood for engine purposes from its tendency to 
generate fiame; and numberless as are the uses to which the timber has 
been put, it is questionable whether it is not fit for many other branches 
of industry in which it has as yet scarcely found a place. Cut in the 
proper season, and properly protected from its tendency to sun-crack, it 
is admirably adapted, after thorough seasoning, for knees, and the 
rigid portions of ships' framing. Indeed, its possible uses are almost 
too vaiious for enumeration, as an instance of which it may be men- 
tioned that it is used with great advantage and economy for the bear- 
ings of machinery, the cost being almost nominal as compared with 
brass, whilst the material is equally sei'viceable and almost indestruc- 
tible. Not only for fixed bearings ; it has even been used for running 
portions, a set of beanng blocks fitted to a horizontal engine having 
lasted for two yeai-s without the slightest sign of imperfection, and being 
then only removed under an impression that prejudice against theii* 
presence might injui'e the sale of the engine, which at that time came 
into the market. 

Following the Redgum we have the Bluegum, Eucalyptus globulus, 
and the Box, Eucalyptus viminalis. The wood of these is of a yellowish- 
grey tint, with a close straight grain. They are of great strength and 
tenacity, and are te be procured in almost any lengths, and with that 
moderate equality of section which makes them so useful for piles, where 
the required length would make the use of Redgum impracticable. 
Unlike the Redgum, however, they are not impervious to the teredo 
navalis. These timbers are admirably adapted for heavy longitudinal 
bearers, and they supply the great bulk of the better qualities of 
''sawn stuff," which finds its way inte the market. From the straight- 
ness of their grain they fuiiiish admirable and sightly mils. Owing to 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 8 75. 23 

its elasticity the Bluegum has a high character fi'om its fitness for the 
outer planking of ships, and Box is much in request for naves of 
wheels, and for the cogs of machinery. Although a good deal of 
affected knowledge is displayed as to these woods, it is difficult to dis- 
tinguish them from one another with any degree of certainty, so that 
almost all the sawn colonial hardwood is called " Bluegum," in virtue 
of the exceptionally good qualities of an imported article, which no 
longer finds its way here, and is indeed scarcely to be procuied in its 
original habitat. 

Stringybark, which supplies a good deal of the second-class sawn 
timber in the market, is a similar wood to the Box, but with a browner 
tint. It is, however, altogether an inferior wood to those previously 
mentioned, and is the worst of all the hardwoods in its inclination to 
twist and wai^p ; besides which, it has a more or less decided tendency 
to dry rot. It is, however, a free-splitting wood, and is extremely 
useful for palings and shingles. Stringybark posts and rails, although 
clean, are only second-class. 

Peppermint is again an inferior wood to Stringybai-k. Like it, 
however, it is a free-splitting wood, and produces second-class palings 
and sliingles, but is useful for very little else, as it does not even make 
good firewood, from its tendency to bum black, without producing flame. 

Whitegum may be set down as a thoroughly worthless wood, although 
a good deal of it finds its way into the market in the shape of sawn 
timber. It has, however, a short grain, and a general tendency to early 
decay, so that it is seldom found sound at the heart. As a consequence 
it is scarcely ever used for engineering or building purposes, except in 
districts where it is the only available timber, and where the expense 
forbids the importation of wood from other districts. 

The Ironbark is one of the hardest and heaviest of our woods. In 
this colony, however, it does not grow to the size it assumes in other 
parts of Australia. It possesses, however, great strength, tenacity and 
elasticity, and is much in request as spokes for coachbuilders' and 
wheelwrights' work. 

The Mountain-ash is another variety of the EucoLyptua, It is ex- 
ceedingly flexible, and is in great favour for almost every purpose in the 
Beechworth district. It is not, however, so well known in Melbourne 
as, fix)m report, it deserves to be. Saw-mills have recently been erected 
at the head of the Plenty to supply the local mai'ket with palings from 
the Mountain-ash. 

The Woolly-butt and the Bloodwood are two varieties of the Euca- 
lyptus peculiar to Gippsland, where they ai^e highly esteemed. The 
fencingmade from both is especially durable, although the latter splits badly. 
These woods, however, never find their way to the Melbourne market. 

There seems to be but little doubt that many of the varieties of the 
Eucalyptus produce timber so much alike that one piece cannot well be 
distinguished from another, even wjien cut from trees having well- 
defined botanical distinctions. As a consequence, the timber receives its 
name more from the fashion of the yard where it is sold, or the sawmill 
where it is cut, than from any well-grounded knowledge of the particular 
member of the family from which it has been derived. 



24 CATALOGUE OP THE 

The genus Acacia supplies those of our native woods next to be con- 
sidered. 

The Blackwood and Light wood are two diffei'ent woods, although 
most people regard the names as synonymous. They are, however, so 
much alike in their characteristics,- and so entirely alike in their uses, 
that they may be considered under one common name — ^Blackwood. 
This is a magnificent wood for every description of cabinet work, as 
it has a beautifully-marked, richly-coloui^d grain, which takes a polish 
freely, and gives an effect not to be surpassed by walnut, to which it 
has many points of similarity. It is very close-grained and heavy, and 
is useful for all purposes where strength and flexibility are required. It 
is largely used by coachbuUders, in every department of their trade ; for 
cooperage ; in the construction of railway caiTiages and trucks, and in 
the better class of agricultural implements. 

The Native Hickory is peculiar to East Gippsland, and takes its name 
from a similarity in the character of its wood to that of the American 
tree after which it is named. Like the rest of the Gippsland timber, 
however, it is all but unknown in Melbourne, although with the com- 
pletion of the Gippsland line, we shall probably see it taking a perma- 
nent place in our market. 

The Myall is a smaller variety of the Acacia, but is, from its gene- 
rally small section, only used for whip handles and other small articles 
of turnery, for which, as well from its hardness as from its strong and 
agreeable odour, it is peculiarly fitted. The latter quality makes it a 
favourite wood for tobacco pipes, which are made in large quantities 
both for home consumption and for expoi'tation. 

The Wattle is the most common of the Acacias, The use of its wood 
is almost universally confined to the manufacture of staves for casks. 
Large quantities of it come into the market as fii^wood. Wattle bark 
is largely used for tanning leather, and a very considerable quantity is 
annually exported to Europe, where it is employed for that purpose. 

Thei*e are a few others of our native woods which must not be omitted, 
but which cannot be more than briefly glanced at. 

She-oak is almost endrely used for firewood for domestic purposes. It 
does not flame, but bums down to an incandescent glowing mass, which 
makes it a peculiarly pleasant fuel for the house. As it takes a fine polish, 
this timber is occasionally used by cabinetmakers for the sake of variety. 

The Honeysuckle is another wood which is scarcely ever used except 
for fuel, although, like the She-oak, it is used by cabinetmakers, chiefly 
for inlaid work in consequence of the conti'ast its colour and markings 
offer to most of our other known woods. 

The Native Cherry is another wood also used in cabinet-work. It is 
admirably adapted for axe-handles and gun-stocks, and is the best of all 
our colonial woods as affording a vehicle for the exercise of the art of 
the woodcarver. 

The Murray Pine is not much lj:nown in Melbourne. It is, however, 
a handsomely-marked useful timber, which is used in the Kortheiii 
districts of the colony for almost eveiy conceivable purpose. It takes a 
fine polish, and exudes a very pleasant aroma. Its defect is the fi^ 
quency of somewhat coai*se knots. 



INTEBCOLOKIAL EXHIBITION, 1 875. 



25 



It simply remains to name a few of the lesser known and less fre- 
quently used woods. Amongst these are the Pencil-wood, a variety of 
lightwood from the Cape Otway Banges ; Kedbox, peculiar to the Beech- 
worth district; the Native Beech, from the mountains at the head of the 
Yarra, and the Desert and the Mountain Cypress fi*om the North- 
western districts of the colony. None of these have, however, at 
present more than a local reputation. The Sassafras may also be 
mentioned as a cabinet wood, and Eemtree veneers are occasionally used 
for the sake of their peculiar markings. 

There are no data on hand by which we might be able to anive at 
the quantity and value of the timber produced in the Colony. Some 
idea may however be arrived at from the returns of capital invested, and 
the number of hands employed, given in the latest statistics, those for 
1873. From these we leam that there were in the Colony 161 saw, 
moulding, framing, and turning mills, 156 of which were driven by 
steam, and the remaining 5 by water ; the total horse-power being 2444. 
The amount of capital invested in land, buildings, machinery and plant 
being £333,869, ^e whole giving employment to 2778 males and 19 
females. It must not be forgotten, however, that this return takes no 
account of the large number pf sawyers, splitters, bullock-diivers, iScc., 
engaged in the production of timber by hand-labour alone. 

Timber-bending is an industry introduced into this colony since the 
date of the last Intercolonial Exhibition, the timbers operated upon 
being almost exclusively Blackwood and Bluegum. 

The importation of timber into the colony forms a very large and 
important branch of trade to an extent of which few persons have wiy 
conception. The Customs returns for the year ending 30th June, 1875^ 
have not been published; but in the year ending 30th Jime, 1874, 
timber was imported into the colony to the extent of £486,030, made 
up as follows : — 

Undressed Timbeiu 
Boards and Lumber - - - 9,976,310 super, ft. 
Deals 10,156,200 



Laths 

ir ■ ■ ■ 

Palings - 

Pickets - - - 

Posts and Rails 

Shineles ... 

Shooks and Staves - 

Spars 

Spokes and Felloes 

Miscellaneous - 



5,398,500 No. 

17,866 

3,021,572 

499,800 

9,200 

225,200 

91,288 

5,400 super, ft. 

123,150 No. 



Boards and Lumber 
Shooks and Staves - 
Spokes and Felloes 



Dressed Timber. 

- 12,712,119 super, ft 

1504 packages 

15 



I) 



£86,138 

113,093 

7.671 

92,246 

16,638 

3,646 

192 

177 

3,416 

100 

1,557 

4,197 



£149,111 
116 
103 



£329,071 



Doors 
Sashes 



MikNUFACTURED ThIBER. 

12,084 No. 
18 Pairs 



7,617 
12 



£149,330 



£7,629* 

£486,030 

* This is exdtisive of the value of the wood worked up into imported furniture, which has not 
been inchided in this return, as other material is in combination witn it. 



26 CATALOGUE OF THE 

There is no' resource but to continue this large importation, in con- 
sequence of the total absence of all indigenous timber fit for the ordi- 
nary uses of the builder and the carpenter. 

The bulk of the timber imported into this market comes fix>ni the 
Baltic : it is almost entirely of red deal, and of the following scantHngs, 
known in the trade as deals: — 12 x 4, 11x4, 11 x 3, 9 x 4, 9 x 3, 8 x 
3, 7x3, and 7 x 2J. Very little log timber comes from the Baltic, and 
that only of inferior quality and small in size. 

The ordinary grooved and tongued flooring of the timber-yard is both. 
of red and white deal, the latter, however, being in far the larger quan- 
tities. It is entirely from the Baltic, although much of it is prepared in 
England, and especially in Scotland, hence its name, "Scotch Flooring." 
The chief sizes are, in inches, 4 x 1^, 6 x 1^, 6 x J, 6 x J, 6 x |, 6 x ^-, 
and 6 X f , the two latter sizes being imported both beaded and plain. 
Large quantities of weatherboards, 4 and 6 out, as they are technically 
called (that is 4 or 6 boards, as the case may be, cut out of a deal 7 x 2^), 
also find theii* way from the Baltic to this market. 

American shipments from the Eastern States consist almost entirely 
of clear pine, pine shelving, and grooved and tongued lumber. Small 
parcels of pitch pine flooring, and immense quantities of laths and 
pickets, reach us from this source. 

Canada sends us clear pine shelving, grooved and tongued timber, 
spruce flooring, and oak staves, as well as laths and pickets in con- 
siderable quantities. 

The Oregon trade is usually in large sizes of timber, and in long 
lengths, ranging in all sizes between 9 x 3 up to 24 inches square, 
and in all lengths up to 90 feet. There is a large demand for this 
timber. Oi-egon also supplies us with large quantities ' of laths and 
pickets. 

New Zealand sends us the Kauri and the Kimu pine, in large 
logs up to 5 feet square and in long lengths; the latter timber also 
coming in the form of lumber; this timber is much used for large work 
when Oi'egon happens to be scarce or dear in- the market. New Zealand 
timber in its various varieties has not yet taken its proper place amongst 
us, or it might have, ere this, rendered us to a gi^eat extent independent 
of our immense European and American imix)rtations. It is, however, 
marred by its tendency to undue slninkage. 

Queensland supplies us with a Pine ; it is a large-sized timber, but is 
an inferior wood to Kauri, being shorter in the gi'ain. Its coloiu* comes 
out well under polish, and it is almost entirely free from knots, which 
renders it a serviceable wood for many descriptions of joinery. 

Cedar comes to us chiefly from Queensland, and the Richmond River 
in New South Wales, This timber is too well known to need descrip- 
tion ; it is extensively used in the manufacture of all sorts of furniture. 

The Jarrah is imported from Western Australia, chiefly for use in the 
<;onstruction of harbour works, in consequence of its reputation for 
being impervious to the attacks of the teredo navcUis, At present its 
price, which is fully 50 per cent, higher than Bedgum, the wood with 
which it more directly competes, almost precludes its use. Besides, this 
timber has not altogether answered the high character claimed for it; 



INTERCOLONIAL SXHIBITION, 1 875. 27 

that whichhas been used in our public works not having shown itself at 
all superior to our own Redgum. Those, however, who have a knowledge 
of the timber ib Western Australia, tell us that there are foiu* distinct 
varieties of wood classed under the specific term, " Jari'ah." They also 
tell us that two of these are worthless ; that a third, the Salmonbai'k, is 
a useful timber, but without any peculiarly distinctive qualities j whilst 
the fourth, the Eed Mahogany, or Mountain Jarrah, is the only one which 
lias the exceptional characteristics claimed for the whole species. This 
variety is of a dark red colour, presenting when cut a beautiful wavy 
grain. 'Unfortunately, however, it grows only on the most barren and 
inaccessible ranges, so that it is scarcely likely to be supplied unless it is 
cut and shipped under tolerably strict sujiervision; and it is owing 
probably to the absence of this supervision that very little else than the 
Urst thi-ee of the above-mentioned varieties have foimd their way to this 
colony. 

The import of sawn timber from Tasmania has almost entirely ceased 
since the imposition of protective duties. The shipments from that 
market are now confined almost entirely to palings, and to small con> 
signments of the Muskwood and the beautifully marked Huon-pine. 

A Billiard-table of Lignum Vitse, from Port Darwin, was an 
exhibit at the last Exhibition, but no fiuiiher consignments have been 
received, although several valuable samples are exhibited upon the 
present occasion. 

Victoria also does an export trade in timber, chiefly supplying the 
districts of Hew South Wales and South Australia within reach of 
water commimication by the Murray and its tributaries. For the year 
ending 30th June, 1874, this export ti-ade amounted to .£31,491, made 
up as follows : — 

Doors - - - - ' - - - 1,616 No. £1,354 

Sashes 1,423 „ ' - - - 1,039 

Dressed Boards and Lumber - - 567,712 sup. feet. - - - 6,467 

Undressed Boards and Lumber • - 464,085 ,, - - - 6,303 

Deals Ill No. ... 45 

Laths 88,080 „ . . . 144 

Logs 263 „ ... 2,720 

Palings 30,500 „ ... 274 

Posts 62 „ ... 1 

Sawn Timber 443,646 sup. feet. - - - 3,196 

Shingles 93,550 „ ... 105 

ShooKs and Staves .... 2,345 packages ... 88 

Spokes and Felloes - . . . 5,063 No. .... 185 

Miscellaneous 9,570 

£31,491 

The disfavour which undoubtedly attaches not only to Victorian but 
to all Aiistralian timber is in a large measure owing to the fact that the 
timber is so frequently felled at improper seasons, whilst the sap vessels 
are full ; and it is a matter for regret that this is never considered by 
the Government in calling for tenders, the completion of the woik being 
often stipulated for at a time which leaves the contractor no alternative 
but to fell his timber after the sap has risen. Another cause of the dis- 
favour is owing to the fact that in exportation due care has not been 



28 CATALOGUE OF THS 

exercised in sending the best sorts, besides which there has been a 
general want of care in withdrawing faulty pieces from shipment. 

It is to be regretted that no series of reliable experiments has ever been 
entered into for the purpose of testing the strength of the different vaiieties 
of Victorian timber, an elaboi*ate series of experiments, conducted by the 
late Mr. J. M. Balfour, C.E., for the commissionei's of the New Zealand 
Exhibition held at Dunedin in 1865, to which several hundred samples 
of the woods of Austi-alia and New Zealand were submitted, giving 
almost the only data for dealing with two or three of our better-known 
varieties, and this not entirely in a satisfactary manner, for not one of 
the specimens experimented upon in Dunedin was the produce of this 
Colony. It appears, too, from Mr. Balfour's paper, giving the results ot 
his experiments, that most of the woods of New South Wales were 
tested by Colonel Wai'd, the present master of the Melbourne Mint, in 
1860-1 ; also that Captain Fowke, the architect of the London Exhibi- 
tion building of 1862, made some experiments with woods from Ne^w 
South Wales in 1855, and with woods from Victoria, of which £1000 
worth, collected under the direction of Baron Von Mueller, was sent 
to England, and deposited as a donation from Victoria to the Kew 
Museum. The information derived from these experiments does not, 
however, appear to be known in this colony. 

The very first export of this colony, as far back as 1803, was timber. 
H.M.S. Calcutta, which was one of the two ships which brought out the 
l>arty which endeavoured to form a settlement on Point Nepean, was 
ordered to take home a cargo of timber fit for naval pinposes. Before 
leaving the Bay, Captain Woodriff* shipped 150 pieces of what 
Lieutenant Tuckey, the historian of the expedition, calls compass-timber, 
an almost obsolete term for the knees and bends suitable for ship-building, 
the which, he goes on to inform us, was chiefly honeysuckle. History is 
silent as to the use made of this valuable consignment of shipbuilding 
timber. 

Wood, viewed as a material, forms a most prominent feature in Victo- 
rian industry ; the manufactories devoted to the piu^pose of convertuig 
the raw material into a form fit for domestic or everyday use are legion. 
There are in Victoria 172 Sawmills and works devoted to Moulding, 
Fleming, and Turning. In this class is included weatherboaixl sawing, 
the splitting of shingles and palings, sash and door manufactories, and 
billiai*d-table making. The 172 factories employ 2800 hands, viz., 2788 
males and 12 females. The aggregate value of the plant and machinery 
is £182,140, the value of the land is estimated at £87,083, and of the 
buildings £45,710. The wholesale value of manufactures produced in 
1874 amounted to over.£450, 000. The largest sawmill and joiners' work 
factory finds employment for 91 hands — 65 men and 26 young persons, 
the former of which earn 10s. per day of 8 horn's, and the latter 2s. per 
day. The wholesale value of manufactures produced during 1874 was 
£46,000. One sawmill and sash-door factoiy produced work in 1874 
to the value of £25,000, employing 76 hands— 56 men who earn 
lis. per day of 8 hours, and 20 young persons. One saw, joiners', and 
moulding mill that employe 70 men earning £3 per week each, and 
working 8 hours per day, produced manufactures in 1874, the wholesale 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 29 

value of which was £25,000. A steam-sawmill employing 130 hands, 
viz., 120 men, 2 women, and 8 young persons, turned out in 1874 work 
to the value of £16,000. A sawmill at Ballarat that employs 16 hands, 
working 9 hours a day for 40s. a week, pix>duced manufactures in 1874 
to the value of £6000, while another at Stony Creek, employing 24 
hands, working 8 hours per day, at wages avei*aging £2 5s. per man, 
produced work to the value of £4220. Of the I'est it can be said that 
the nimiber of hands varies from 5 up to 20, and that the wholesale 
value of manufactures produced during 1874 ranges fi-om £400 up to 
£3280. The wages for men vary from 35s. to £2 10s. per week. The 
wholesale value of the work done by steam bending mills in 1874 was 
about £10,000. The wages averaged are, men from £1 15s. to £2, and 
boys lOs. per week. 

An important industry in connection with wood is that of Cooperage. 
There are in Victoria 14 cooperage works, which give employment to 
109 hands, viz., 106 men and 3 women. The aggi*egate value of the 
plant and machinery employed is £570, the value of the land upon 
which the works are erected can be set down at £2450, and the value 
of the buildings themselves at £2000. The wholesale value of manu- 
factures produced during the year 1874 is approximately estimated at 
from £25,000 to £27,000. The largest cooperage works about which 
the Commissioners have received returns employ 14 hands — 10 men 
and 4 youths, who, working 9 hours per day, receive — the former 
£3 10s. per week per man, and the latter £1 2s. Tlie wholesale value 
of the work turned out in the year 1874 amoimted to £3050. Another 
coopei-age employs 10 hands — 7 men and 3 youths, the former of whom 
earn £2 5s., and the latter 8s. per week, working 9 hours per day. The 
wholesale value of the manufactures produced during 1874 amounted to 
£3000. The wholesale value of the manufactures produced in a third in 
1874 can be estimated at £2420, the wages of men being £2 10s. per 
cooperage for week, and of youths 15s. The number of men employed 
in the remaining factories varies from 1 to 15; and the wholesale value 
of the manufactures produced in 1874 fi-om £80 to £1000. 



Group 5. 

ADAMS, JAMES, Post Office, Wahring. 

125 White Tuscan Wheat. 

BELL, ALLAN, Mount Barker, South Australia. 

126 Purple Straw Wheat. 

127 Tuscan Sti-aw Wheat. 

BUCKLEY, EDWARD, Newbridge, Loddon. 

128 Red Straw Wheat, from the Loddon District, grown in tlm 

County of Gladstone. 

129 Red Straw Wheat, gi*own in County of Bondigo. 






30 CATALOGUE OF THB 

Group 6. 

COMMISSIONERS OF THE PHILADELPHIA EXHIBITION-, 

Meboume. 

The following yac similes consist of specimens, the oiiginaJs of whicb. 
were selected during the past season, modelled and arranged for the 
Commissioners by Mr. Thos. McMillan. They embrace most of all of 
the important species cultivated, and in many cases such assortments of 
varieties as are calculated to sufficiently illustrate the orchard and other 
open ground fruit-producing capabilities of Victoiia. 

ARBOEESCENT FRUITS. 

PoMACEous Fruits, including the Apple and Pear and their 

Allies. 

T/is Apple — Pyrus malus. 

130 Adams' Pearmain (266). Josiah Trevestan, Ballarat. 

131 Alfreston (179). Charles Draper, Hazelglen. 

132 Allanbank Seedling (177). „ 

133 Betty Geeson (230). 

134 Blondin (292). H. U. Cole, Twyfoi-d, Upi^er Hawthorn. 

135 Blenheim Oi*ange (206). C. Draper. 

136 Blenheim Orange (253). Robert Wliatmough, Greensborougb. 

137 Borovitzki (145). C. Draper. 

138 Boston Russet (272). „ 
138a Boston Russet (209). „ 

139 Brabant Bellefleur (191). „ 

140 Bridgewater Pippin (137). Horticultural Society of Victoria. 

141 Burkehardt's Reinette (241). John Harbison, Essendon. 

142 Callasaga (239). „ „ 

143 Cellini (210). C. Draper. 

144 Cellini (265). J. Ti^evestan. 

145 Cleopatra (216). C. Draj)er. 

146 Clayton (304). C. Dmper. 

147 Cleopatra (281). Robert Whatmough. 

148 Cockle Pippin (173). John Smith & Sons, RiddelFs Ci-eek. 

149 Comet (287). T. C. Cole. 

150 Compton (153). Hoi-ticultural Society of Victoria. 

151 Compton (163). Robert Whatmough. 

152 Cornish Aromatia (188). C. Draper. 

153 Cornish Gilliflower (262). King & Sons, Fyansfoi-d. 

154 Court Rendu (Court Rendu Rose, 263). Geelong and Wastem 

District Agricultural and Horticultural Society, 

155 Cox's Omnge Pippin (181). Charles Draper. 

156 Cox's Pomona (243). J. Harbison. 

157 Crisp Pippin (291). H. U. Cole. 

158 Crow's Egg (270). C Di-aper. 

159 Crow's Egg (313). W. N. Hunt, Malvern. 

160 Devonshire Quan-enden (139). Horticultural Society of Vic- 

toria. 



INTERCOLONIAL. EXHIBITION, 1875. 

61 Diunelow's Seedling (202). ChoB. Draper. 

62 Dutch Mignonne (310). „ 

63 Emperor Alexander (178). „ 

64 Emperor Alexander (244). Chas. Allan, jun., South Biighton. 

65 Esopus Spitzenberg (240). J. Harbison. 
.66 Esopus Spitzenberg (269). C. Draper. 

67 Fairy (274). „ 

68 Full Pippin (196). 

69 Feam's Pippin (219). „ 

70 Forge (233). , „ 

71 Forge (311). „ 

72 Garibaldi (314). Horticultural Society of Victoria. 

73 Grinston's Nonpareil (167). Robt. Wliatmough. 

74 Gladney's Red Streak (305). C. Draper. 

75 Gloster Pippin (152). Horticultural Society of Victoria. 

76 Golden Noble (172). J. Smith and Son. 

77 Gravenstein (171). „ 

78 Guinea Apple (286). T. C. Cole. 

79 Hall (302). C. Draper. 

80 Hambeldon deux Ans (315). Tliomas Christian, Mount 
Macedon. 

« 

.81 Herefordsliire Pearmain (225). C. Draper. 

82 Homony (140). Horticultural Society of Victoiia. 
.83 Hone's Albert (261). W. Lawford, Doncaster. 
.84 Horn (298). C. Draper. 

85 Indian Winter (301). C. Draj^er. 

86 Jewett's Best (242). J. Harbison. 

87 Kentish Fillbasket (264). Geelong and Western District Agii- 
cultural and Horticultural Society. 

88 Kentucky Red Streak (300). C. l/raper. 

83 Keswick Codlin (147). 
99 King John (285). T. C. Cole. 

90 Lake (138). Horticultural Society of Victoria. 

91 Lord Lennox (149). C. Draper. 
97 Lord Lennox (199). 

94 Lord Suffield (142). 

95 Loi-d Suffield (237). J. Carson, President of the Horticultural 
Society of Victoiia. 

96 Mannington's Pearmain (212). C. Draper. 

97 Maiden's Blush (160). R. Whatmough. 

98 Maiden's Blush (200). C. Draper. 

99 Mk-e de Menage (236). 

200 MoVs Royal (226). 

201 Mother (235). J. Robei-ts. 

202 Norfolk Beaufin (187). C. Dmper. 

203 Northern Spy (231). „ 

204 Noi-thwood (256). R. Whatmough. 

205 Peannain, New Scarlet (282). T. C. Cole.' 

206 Pomme de Neige (312). H. Boyce, Ganlener to the Hon. 

Henry Miller. 






9f 



32 CATALOGUE OF THE 

207 Porter (141). J. Harbison. 

208 Pidnce Bismarck (276). Mr Preike, Carisbrook. 

209 Rhode Island Greening (273). C. Drajjer. 

210 Rhode Island Greening (192). „ 

211 Ribston Pippin (184). W. Lawford. 

212 Rock Pippin (283). T. C. Cole. 

213 Royal Russet (265). R. Whatmough. 

214 Royal Russet (197). C. Draper. 
216 Red CalviUe (262). R. Whatmough. 

216 Reinette de Canada (276). Mr. Freike, Carisbi-ook. 

217 Romanite (308). C. Draper. 

2 1 8 Rymer (2 38). T. C. Cole. 

219 Scarlet Nonpareil (183). C. May, Sunbury. 

220 Shockley (303). Chas. Draper. 

221 Shorland Pearmain (293). H. TJ. Cole. 

222 Silver Reinette (289). T. C. Cole. 

223 Silverskin (290). T. C. Cole. 

224 Southend (294). H. U. Cole. 

225 Southern -Greening (295). H. U. Cole. 

226 St. Lawrence (280). R. Whatmough. 

227 Stoup Leamington (174). J. Smith and Sons. 

228 Stephenson's Winter (306). C. Draper. 

229 Stetling Pippin (165). R. Whatmough. 

230 Summer Rose (144). C. Draper. 

231 Sutton's Seedling (299). „ 

232 Summer Queen (150). „ 

233 Tom Marland (156). R. Whatmough. 

234 Tuscalosa Seedling (307). C. Draper. 

235 Tower of Glamis (162). R. Whatmough. 

236 Tower of Glamis (186). a Draper. 

237 Twyford PiK)in (290^). T. C. Cole. 

238 Warner's King (143). C. Draper. 

239 Warner's King (161). R. Whatmough. 

240 Washington (201). C. Draper. 

241 Whatmough's Bitter Sweet (259). R. Whatmough. 

242 „ „ „ (558). 
242a „ „ „ (260). 

243 „ Tom Thumb (245). 

244 „ Lancashire Lass (246). ,, 

245 . „ Willis Vale Beauty (247). 

246 „ Scarlet Pearmain (248). „ 

247 „ Winter Pippin (249). 

248 „ Fancy. (250). „ 

249 „ Red Streak (277). 

250 „ Kiiig of the Pippins (254). „ 

251 William's Favourite (148). C. Draper. 

252 Winter Majetin (208). 

253 Winter Peach (271). 

254 Winter Pippin (284). T. C. Cole. 

255 Yellow Bellefleur (232). C. Draper. 

256 White Moss (158). R Whatmough. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 33 

The Pear — Pyrna communis. 

257 Aglae Gregoire (60). T. C. Cole, Eichmond Nursery. 

258 Alexandre Lainbr6 (46). Charles Draper, Hazelgleu. 

259 Bergamot, Aatumn (96). J. Harbison, Essendon. 

260 Bergamot, Gansers (88). J. D. Roberts, Hawthorn. 

261 Beurre d'Amanlis (98). J. Harbison. 

262 „ d'Anjou (39). C. Draper. 

263 „ „ (112). Robert Hepburn, Hawthorn. 

264 „ BoBc (84). A. Stuart, Gardener to Armstrong, Toorak. 

265 „ Bosc (79). R. Hepburn. 

266 „ Capiaumont (83). George Kilroy. 

267 „ Citron des Cannes (32). Horticultural Society of Victoria. 

268 „ Clairgeau (105). Robert Whatmough, Greensborough. 

269 „ Diel (53). C. May, Sunbury. 

270 „ „ (64). J. Harbison. 

271 „ „ (117). C. Draper. 

272 „ . d'Esperen (40). „ 

273 „ Giffard (30). Horticultural Society of Victoria. 

274 „ Hardy (a and b 78). R. Hepburn. 

275 „ Superfin(68). 

276 „ Sterckman's (119). R. Whatmough. 

277 Conseilleur de la Cour (123). C. Draper. 

278 D^sir^ Com^lis (74). 

279 „ „ (87). 

280 Doyenne Boussoch (86). „ 

281 Doyenne du Comice (75). R. Hepburn. 

282 „ „ (111). 

283 Duchesse d'Angoultoe (90). J. D. Roberts. 

284 „ „ (118). R. WhatmougL 

285 „ „ (56). H. U. Cole, Upper Hawthorn. 

286 Durandeau (41). C. Draper. 

287 Emile d'Heyst (122). „ 

288 Gratioli of Jersey (33). Garden of the Horticultural Society of 

Victoria. 

289 Frederic de Wurtemberg (89). J. D. Roberts. 

290 Hessle (32 J). Horticultural Society of Victoria. 

291 Huysche's Victoria (124). C. Draper. 

292 Josephine de Malines (115). James Lang, Harcourt. 

293 King Edward's (52). J. C. Cole. 

294 Leon le Clerc de Laval (72). R. Hejibum. 

295 „ „ „ (126). Sir Redmond Barry. 

296 Louise Bonne of Jersey (49). J. C. Cole. 

297 „ „ „ (102). J. Banks, Kensington. 

298 Majie Louise (35). Archibald Stewart. 

299 „ „ (108). Mr. James, Mount Pleasant, Ballarai. 

300 Madame Cole (61). J. C. Cole. 

301 Madame Treyve (50). „ 

302 „ „ (95.) J. Harbison* 

303 Nouvelle Fulvie (59). J. C. Cole. 



34 CATALOGUE OP THE 

304 Passans du Portugal (114). J. Harbison. 

305 Poii'e de Berriays (36). C. Draper. 

306 Poire de Berriays (82). Greorge Kili'oy. 

307 Preston Beun-e (97). J. Harbison. 

308 Reine de Preooce (29). Horticultural Society of Victoria. 

309 Soldat Esperen (48). J. C. Cole. 

310 Summer Doyenne (31). Horticultural Society of Victoria, 

311 St. Michael Archange (109). J. C. Cole. 

312 Triomphe de Jodoigne (51). „ 

313 Triomphe de Jodoigne (106). J. Webber, Qeelong. 

314 Urbaniste (69). R. Hepburn. 

315 Uvedale's St. Grermaine (34). Archibald Stuart. 

316 Uvedale's St. Germaine (128). Joseph Bosisto, Richmond. 

317 Uvedale's St. Germaine (129). Joseph Webster, Wahgunyah. 

318 Vicar of Winkfield (67). H. U. Cole, Upper Hawthorn. 

319 Vergaleuse (38). C. Draper. 

320 Vineuse (58). J. C. Cole. 

321 Whatmough's Nonsuch (104). R. Whatmough. 

322 Winter Nelis (70). A. Stuart. 

323 Winter Nelis (113). James Lang. 

324 Williams* Bon Chretien (101). Charles Allan, jimior. South 

Brighton. 

325 Whatmough's Bon Chretien (120). R. Whatmough. 

326 Z^pherin Louis Gr^goire (47). J. C. Cole. | 

The Quince — Cydonia vulgmis, 

327 Pear-shaped, Sir Redmond Barry. 

328 Portugal, Webb, Geelong. 

The Medlctr — Mespilus G&nnanica^ 

329 Photograph. 

330 The Loquat — Eriobyra Japonica, 

I 

i 
Stone Fbuits, or Fleshy Drupes. 

1. drupace^ vera. 

The Feaeh — Aurygdalue, 

331 Newington (8). C. Draper. 

332 Duke of Edinburgh (9). R. Whatmough. 

333 Pike's Seedling (10). W. Lawford. 

334 Whatmough's Seedling, two specimens (11 and 12). R. What- I 

mough. 

335 Galway (13). J. McDonald. 

336 Galway (14). Geelong and Western District Agricultural and 

Horticultural Society. 

The Nectarine — Aurygdalue Feraica var. I 

337 Pitmaston Orange (2). R. Whatmough. ; 

338 A Dish of Fruit (3 and 4). Market 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 35 



The Apricot — Primus Armeniaea, 

339 A Dish of Fruit. 

Tlie Plum--Prunu8 domestica. 

340 A Dish of Fruit. 

TJiS Clierry — Prunris ceraaus, 

341 A Dish of Fruit. 

2. OLEACEiG. 

343 The Olive Curopaea. 



Berried or Baccate Fruits and their Modipk^ations. 

The Grape — Vitia vmefera. 

343 A Bunch of Black Hamburg (see also Photographs). 

TJie Mulberry — Morue nigra, 

344 A Small Dish. 

Tlte Fig — Ficus carica. 

345 A Dish of Fruit. 

T/ie Orange, or Citron — Tribe: Citrus, 

346 A Collection. 

The Kaii Apple — Aberia Caffre, 

347 Specimen presented by Graham. 

348 Specimen from the Melbourne Botanical Gardens. 

349 Half-section of the same. 

* 

Tlie Gooseberry — Ribes Gosaalaria, , 

360 Hero of the Nile (1). Thomas Lang and Co. 

351 King of Trumps (2). 

362 Telegraph (3). 

363 Gretna Green (4). 

364 Snowdrop (5). 
366 Patience (6). 

366 Mitre (7). 

367 Whitesmith (8). 

368 Flora (9). 

369 Gobye (10). 

360 Drill (11). 

361 High Sheriff (12). 

362 Briton (16). 

363 Eagle (16). 

364 Roaring Lion (17). 
306 Lord of the Manor (18). 

366 Leveller (19). 

367 Duke of Edinburgh (20). 

368 Speedwell (22). F. Moss. 



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36 CATALOGUE OF THE 

The Black Cwrrtmt — B/Sbes nigTum. 
869 A Bunch of Black Currants. Thomas Lang and Co. 

The Red Currant — Ribrua rubrum, 
370 A Bunch Red Currants (La Versaillaise). Thomas Lang and Co. 

T/is White Currant — Itibrus rubrum (fr. Album), 
871 A Bunch White Dutch Currants. Thomas Lang and Co. 

The Raspb&rry — Sulmsidceus, 

372 A Dish, from five varieties of Raspberries. Henry Boyce. 

Nuts and Dky Drupes. 

373 The Almond Walnut. 



Annual and Perennial Herbaceous Fruits. 
Tlie Stran/oberry — Fragaria vesca, 
874 TroUope's Victoria and Marguerite. 

The TorruUo — Lycopersiewm esculentium, 

375 Large Fruited. Horticultural Society^s Gardens. 

376 Over a Pound. W. Chandless, Scoresby. 

377 Defiance. King & Son, Fyansford. 

378 Plum-shaped Tomato. Horticultural Society's Gardens. 
879 Pear-shaped Tomato. Horticultural Society's Gardens. 

The Egg Apple — Melongena Bolanwm m,el(mgena. 

380 Early small Purple-fruited. H. J. Dines, gardener to Hon. P. T. 

Sargpod. 

The Cape Gooseberry — Phyaalis edvlis, 

381 Small Dish of Cape Gooseberries. 

The Capsicwm — Ca/nnumn, 
882 Capsicums. 

For Illustrations of the Melon, Cucwmher^ Squash and Gourdy see 

PJiotographs. 



CONNOR, JAMES, Allansford. 

383 Foxtail Oats, grown at Mepunga, near Warmambool; 51 lbs. 

to imperial bushel. 

DAVIS, F. E., Fulham, Adelaide, South Australia. 
383a Preserved Potatoes. 

EDWARDS & EASTERBY, Howlong, New South Wales. 

384 Purple Straw Wheat 



I5TEBCOU>KIAL ESHIBITIOX, 1S75. 37 

FREEMAN, WnjJAM, Tboborack 

385 Dried Fiums. 

386 Pmnes. 

Mannfactored from Fruit grown bj the exhibitor, 

GILMOTJR, ANDREW, Colvinsky, Buangor. 

387 OatBy 501b8. 14ozs. per imperial bushel, grown in Uie parish of 

BallarogaiL Took &^ prize at Ararat on 18th MaixJi, 
1875 ; and first prize at Skipton and Beaufort on 24th and 
25th March, 1875. 

GOTJGH & SMITH, 150 Little FHnders-street East, Melbourne, 

388 Gippsland Hops. 

388a Victorian Hops, grown at the Aboriginal Station, CorandeiTk. 

HAMILTON, HON. T. F., M.L.C., Parliament House, Melbounio. 

389 White Tuscan Wheat. 

HARDY, THOMAS, Bankside Vineyard, Adelaide, South Austmlia. 

390 Muscatel (loose) Raisins. 

391 Muscatel (layers) Raisins. 

392 Sultana Raisins. 

393 Zante Currants. 

JACK, JOHN, Farmer, Oxley Plains, Ovens District. 

394 Frampton White Wheat, grown on chocolate soil after English 

grass. 

KILSBY, JAMES, Bentley Hop Gardens, Mount OamWer, Soutli 

Australia. 

395 Hops, season 1875; grown and cured at Bentley Hop OnnUrnHf 

Mount Crambier, South Austiulia. 

LAIDLAY, JOHN, Bundoora, Plenty-road, 

396 Wheat. 

LEWIS BROTHERS, Tamworth, New South Wtihm. 

397 Wheat. 

McNAIR, ANGUS, Bellerine EhhU 

398 yew Fodder Pea ; yield 45 buiihelii to th^, wnrfj, 



MELLON, FRANCLS, Tivoli Viw^^arrl, IhtuoWy. 

399 Assorted Dried Fmiti^ 

MONCRIEFF, JOHN, 1M% iit^Mmm hitfrr, 

400 Tuiple Straw Wheat, ISm. I a^wl Z. 

401 Adelaide Society Wheat, Na 2. 



402 Barley. 



38 CATALOGUE OF THE 

NORTH-EASTERN PASTORAL & AGRICITLTURAL SOCIETY, 

Murchison. 

403 Wheat grown by J. M'Nab, Tabilk. 

O'KEEFE, ANPREW, Adelaide Vale, Clare Inn. 

404 Purple Straw Wheat 

POLSTON, ANGUS, Chapman, Moyston. 

405 Tartarian Oats. 

406 English Barley. 

407 Purple Straw Wheat. 

408 White Wheat. 

RIGOS, JOHN, Osmingfcon Farm, Gawler, South Australia. 

409 Purple Stmw Wheat. 

ROSSI, THOMAS, Dry Diggings, Hiear Daylesford. 

4 1 Purple Straw Wheat. 

SCHMITT, LOUIS, Momington. 

411 Wheat which obtained the first prize at the Momington Farmei-s' 

Society Exhibition at Cranboume, 1875. 

SCOTT, JAMES, Indigo, Chiltem. 

412 Wheat, grown by the exhibitor. 

STEWART & FERGUSON, Indigo, CMltem. 

413 Whqat grown by exhibitors, and exhibited at tie Chiltem 

Agricultui'al Society's Show, February, 1875. 

ST. ARNAUD PASTORAL AND AGRICULTURAL SOaETY, 

St. Arnaud; S. B. Golden, Secretary. 

414 Wheat. 

415 Barley. 

416 Short Oats. 

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN COMMISSIONERS, Adelaide, South 

Australia. 

417 Nonpareil Wheat. 

418 Purple Straw Wheat. 

419 Hybrid Lamas Wheat. 
419a Tuscan Wheat. 

420 Red Lamas Wheat. 

421 White Oats. 

422 Cape Oats. 

423 Cape Barley. 

424 Scotch Barley. 

425 Horse Beans. 

426 Peas. 

427 Rape Seed. 

428 Rye Seed. 

429 Rip Seed. 

430 Hemp Seed. 

431 Lucerne Seed. 
431a Linseed, 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. *^'^ 

TAYLOR, JOHN, AUansford. 

432 Adelaide Wheat, grown at Mepunga, near Warmambool. 

433 Long Red Mangold Wurzel. 

434 Orange Globe do. 

435 Globe Onions. 

VETTLER, JOHN, Echuca Vineyard, Ecliuca. 

436 Sultana Raisins. 

WURM, FRED, Adelaide, South Australia. 
43tA. Box Malaga Layers. 
436i Box Muscatel Layers. 
436c Box Sultana Layers. 
436d Box Loose Raisins. 
436b Box Currants, preserved, 
436f iox CuiTants, scoured. 

CO]VJid:iSSIONERS FOR PHILADELPHIA EXHIBITION, 

Melbourne. 

437 Tfte Ferns from Dandenong State Forest. 

438 Ti'e Ferns from Momit Macedon. 

439 To«a Ferns ft-om Mount Macedon. 

440 Fens from Dandenong State Forest. 

441 Driid Ferns from Dandenong State Forest. 

CBANYELL, BENJAMIN, 66 Park-street West, Emerald Hill. 

442 Bool of New Zealand Ferns, bound in wood, luid cai'ved in fern 

leaves; natural colour preserved. 

HRBCTOR OF BOTANIC GARDENS, MELBOURNE, 

Carpological Collection. 

Order. Habitat. 

443 Abrus precatoiius (Linnaeus) Leguminosa; — The Queensland 

Beaded Liauii ifeN.AusU 

444 Acacia armata (Robt. Brown) Leguminosa? — The Victoiia 

Prickly Aciicia 

445 Acacia calamifolia (Sweet) ... l^eguminoHje — Tlie Victoria 

Reed-leaved Acacia 

446 Icaciariffens/A. Ciuminffliam) ] y ^r- x • 

447 i.chordophylla(F.vonM«eller) / I^S«n»"'««« VK-frna 

448 Icacia cultrifomiis (A Cunning- LeguniinoKie X.S.Wales 

bam) 

449 .ca(»a dentifei'a (Bentliaui) ... lAy^xinnnfyavLi W. Au«i. 

450 .cacia brachyljotrya (Bentliam) LfigumiiioKie Vict^jiia 

— ^variety Glaucopbylla 

451 cacia extensa (Lindley) ... Ijegurninosas W. Au«t. 

452 eacda homalophyUa (A- Cun- Le^iiiiinosje — ^Tlic Victoria 
ningham) Myall 

453 caeia implexa (Bentham) . . . Leguminosa; — Tlie Victoria 

Twisted Acacia 

454 xada jitaiperina (Willdenow) Leguminosie — Tlie Victoria 

Juniper-leaved 
Acacia 



40 CATALOGUE Ot THE 

Order. Habitats 

455 Acacia lopliantha (Willdenow) Leguminosse — ^The W. Aust. 

Crested Wattle 

456 Acacia longifolia (Willdenow) Leguminosse — ^The Victoria 

Long-lvd. Acacia 

457 Acacia lunata (Sieber) ... Leguminosse Victoria 

458 Acacia melanoxylon (R. Brown) Leguminosse — ^The Victoria 

Blackwood 

459 Acacia myrtifolia (Willdenow) Leguminosse — ^The Victoria 

Myrtle-lvd. Acacia 

460 Acacia pulchella (Bobt. Brown) LeguminossB W. AiM. 

461 Acacia retinodes (Schlechten- Leguminosae Victoiia 

dahl) 

462 Acacia Biceana (Henslow) . . . Leguminosae Tasnania 

463 Acacia salicina (Lindlej) . . . LeguminossB — ^The Victoria 

Willow-leaved 
Acacia 

464 Acacia saligna (Wendland) . . . Leguminosse — ^The W Aust. 

Weeping Acacia 

465 Acacia sphacelata (Bentham) . . . Leguminosse . W Aust. 

466 Acacia spinescens (Bentham) .. . LeguminoBse Vctoria 

467 Acacia suaveolens (Willdenow) Leguminosse — ^The Aictora 

Sweet-scented 
Acacia 

468 Acacia vestita (Ker) ... ... Leguminos® J. S. Tales 

469 Acacia sp. ... ... ... Leguminosse (Jueenland 

470 Agonis flexuosa (Schauer) . . . Myrtace» — The "V. Alt 

Willow Myrtle 

471 Agonis juniperina (Schauer) ... Myrtacese — Juni- W. Ait. 

pei>leaved Agonis 

472 Agonis marginata (Schauer) . . . MyrtacesB W. At. 

473 Angophora intermedia (De Myrtacese — The Victor 

Candolle) Spurious Apple- 

tree 

474 Angophora subvelutina (F. von Myrtacese Queeiand 

Mueller) <kN,W. 

475 Araucaria Bidwilli (Hooker) ... Coniferse — The Queeiand 

Bunya Bunya 
Pine 

476 Araucaria excelsa(Bobt. Brown) Ooniferse — The Norfblsld. 

Norfolk I. Pine 

477 Arthropodium strictimi (Bobt. Liliacese Victa 

Brown) 

478 Atriplex nummularium (lind- Chenopodeae Vicia 

ley) 

479 BaJoghia lucida (Endlicher) ... Euphorbiacese — Qu^.(& 

The Bloodwood N. Sales 

480 Banksia integrifolia (Ion- Proteace» — The Yio^ 

nseus, fil.) Coast Honeysuckle * 

481 Banksia Preissii Proteaceee W. S-^* 



\ 



tHTEBCOLOKlAL SXHIfilTlOH, 



■8;s. 



482 BankHut serrata (Limuens, fil.) Froteaceffi 

483 BanksiaBp Proteacera 

484 Borouia denticulata (Smith) ... Rutacece 

485 Bursana spinosa (Cavanilles)... Fittosporeie — The 

Prickly Box 

486 BossiEeaheteroph7llei(Yeiit«nat) Leguminoeee 

487 Bo8si«ea microphylla (Smith) ... L^uminosse 

488 BoBsiffia rhombifolia (Sieber) ... L(^i;uinino8ce 

489 BoBsitea Bcolopendria (Smith) ... Leguminoece 

490 Brachjsema lanceolata (Meias- LeguminoBse 

ner) 

491 Burchardia umbellata (Bobt. MelanthaceEB 

Brown) 

492 Calectasia intermedia Juncacece 

493 Callicoma Berratifolio (Andrews) Saxifrageae 

494 CaUistemoubrach}'BndruB(Lind- Myrtaoeee 

ley) 

495 Callistemon ooocinevia (F. von Myrtaceae — The 

Mueller) Scarlet Bottle- 

brash 

496 Callistemon speciosus (De Can- ) 

dolle) > Myrtaceie 

497 C. glaucus (F. von Mueller) ...J 

498 Ca!list«monlanceolfttus{DeCaji- MyrtaccBB 

doUe) 

499 Galliatemon linearis (De Can- Myrtaceae 

doUe) 
600 CalliBtemonphceniceus(Lindley) Myrtaceee 

501 Callistemon rigidus (Robt. Uyrtacese 

Brown) 

502 Callistemon salignus (De Can- Myrtacese 

dolle) 

503 Callistemon R]). Myrtaceat 

504 Callitria actinoetrobuB (F. von Conifers 

Mueller) 

505 Calothamnus purpureus (End- Myrtacece 
- licher) 

506 Calothamnus quadrifidus (Bobt. Myrtaceie 

Brown) 

507 Calothamnus sanguineus (Labil- Myrtaoete 

lardi^re) 
608 Carumbium populifolium (Rein- Euphorbiaci'Hf 
ward) 

509 CarmichEelia australis (Robert Leguminosie 

Brown) 

510 Casuarina glanca (Sieber) CasuarineEe — The; 

Desert Sheonk 



Habitat 
Victoria 
W. Auat 
W. Auat. 
Victoria 

Victoria 
Victoria 
N.S. Wales 
&Queensld. 
H.S. Wales 
W. Auat. 

Victoria 



Queensld.^ 

N.S. Wales 
Victoria 



W. Aust 

Victoria 

N.S. Wales 

W. AuHt. 
N.S. Wales 

Victoria 

W. Aust. 
W. Aust 
W. AuBt. 
W. Auat. 
VictuiiH 
NtiwZeaJiind 
Viotori* 




42 CATALOGUE OV TU£ 

Order. Habitat. 

511 Casuarina quadnvalvis (Labil- Oaauarmese — Tlie Victoria 
lardidre) Coast or Di:oop 

ing Sheoak 
612 Casuaiina suberosa (Otto V. Casuarinese — The Victoria 
Dietrich) Erect or Cork 

Bark Sheoak 

513 Casuaiina distyla (VenteDat) Casuarinese — The Victoria 

Stunted Sheoak 

514 Cafitanospermum Austi*ale (A. Leguminosae — ^The Queensland 

Cunningham) Moreton Bay 

Chestnut 

515 Cassytha melantha (Robert Laurineae Victoria 

Brown) 

516 Cedrela Toona (Roxbui'gh) ... Meliacese — The N.S.W.and 

Ked Cedar Queensland 

517 Chorizema ilicifolium (Labillar- Leguminosae W. Aust. 

difere 

518 Citriobatus multiflorus (A. Cun* Pittosporew Queensland 

ningham) & N.S.W. 

519 Coprosma lucida (Eoi*ster) .... Rubi£U)e«e — Ka- K. Zealand 

rangu 

520 Comespenna volubile (Labil- Polygalese — Blue Victoria 

lardifere) Climber 

521 Corrsea alba (Andi-ews) ... Rutacese Victoria 

522 CoiTsea speciosa (Alton) ... Butace«e — The Victoria 

Native Fuchsia 

523 Corynocarpus Isevigatus (Fors- Myrsinacese — The N. Zealand 

ter) Native Laurel, or 

Karaka 

524 Corypha Australis (Robert Palmese — The Fan East Aust. 

Brown) Palm 

525 Cordyline Foi-steri (F. von Liliacese — The N. Zealimd 

Mueller) • Broad-leaved Palm 

Lily 

526 Cordyline indivisa (Kunth) ... Liliaceae — ^TheTall N. Zealand 

Palm Idly 

527 Cupania Martyana • ... ... Sapindacese — 

528 Cyathodes adscendens (Hooker, Epacridese Tasmania 

fil.) 
520 Cyeas media (Robei-t Brown)... Cycadese N. Aust. & 

Queensland 

530 Cycas gracilis (Miguel) ... Cycadese Queensland 

531 Daviesia corymbosa (Smith) ... Leguminos® — The Victoria 

Native Hop 

532 Daviesia ulicina (Smith) ... Leguminosae — ^The Victoria 

Furze-lvd. Nat. Hop 

533 Dillwynia ericifolia, variety Leguminosse Victoria 

glaberrima (Smith) 

534 DUlwynia hispida (Lindley) ... Leguminosee Victoria 






INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 



43 



535 Dodonaea triqueti'a (Andrews) 

536 Dodonsea viscosa (Liimseus) ... 

537 Doryanthes excelsa (Correa de 

Serra) 

538 Doryanthes Palmieii (W. Hill) 



539 Dry andra floiibunda (R. Brown) 

540 Elseocarpus dentatus (Vahl) ... 

541 Elaeocarpus cyaneus (Alton) ... 

542 EntelasB arborescens (R. Brown) 
643 Eremophila bignoniaeflora (F. 

von Mueller) 

544 Eremophila longifolia (F. von 

Mueller) 

545 Eremophila maculata (F. von 

Mueller) 

546 Eriostemon myoporoides (De 

Candolle) 

547 Eucalyptus calophylla (Robt* 

Brown) 

548 Eucalyptus colossea (F. von 

Mueller) 

549 Eucalyptus coriacea (A- Cun- 

ningham) 

550 Eucalyptus comuta (Labillar- 

difere) 

551 Eucalyptus comuta (Labillar- 

diere), vaiiety symphyocaipa 

552 Eucalyptus corymbosa (Smith) 

553 Eucalyptus corynocalyx (F. von 

Mueller) 

554 Eucalyptus ficifolia (F. von 

Mueller) 

555 Eucalyptus leucoxylon (F. von 

Mueller) 

556 Eucalyptus globulus (Labillar- 

diere) 

557 Eucalyi^tus globulus, variety ... 

558 Eucalyptus inci'assata (Labxllai*- 

difei*e) 

559 Eucalyptus mezacai'pa (F. von 

Mueller) 

560 Eucalyptus melliodora (A. Cun- 

ningham) 



Order. 
SapindaoesB 
Sapindacese — The 

Native Lig. vitae 
Amaryllidese — 

The N. S. Wales 

Spear Lily 
Amaiyllide*- 

The Queensland 

Spear Lily 
Proteacese 
Tiliacese — Hinau 
Tiliaceee 

Tiliacese - Hauama 
Myoporinete 

MyoporinesB 

MyopoiinesB 

Rutacese 

Myrtaceas 

Myrtaceae — The 

Kairi Gum 
MyrtaceaB — The 

Mountain White 

Gum 
MjrrtaceaB — The 

Yeit Tree 
MyrtaceaB 

MyrtaceaB — The 
Bloodwood Gum 
MyrtaceaB 

Myi-taceae — The 

Blackbut 
MyrtaceaB — The 

Iix)nbark 

MyrtaceaB — The 
Common Blue G um 
Myrtaoeae 
Myiiiaoeae — The 
Mallee Scrub Gum 
MyrtaceaB 

MyrtaceaB — The 
Yellow Box 



Habitat. 
Victoria 
Victoria 

N. S. Wales 



Queensland 

W.Australia 
N. Zealand 
Victoiia 
N. Zealand 
Victoria 

Victoria 

Victoria 

Victoiia 

W. Aust. 

W. Aust. 

Victoria 

W. Aust. 

W. Aust. 

N. S. Wales 
& Queensld. 
South Aust. 

W. Aust. 

Victoria 

Victoria 

Victoria 
N.S.Wales, 
S.ikW.Aust. 
W. Aust. 

Victoi-ia 



44 



CATALOGUE OF THE 



561 
562 
563 
564 
565 

566 

567 

568 

569 

570 
571 

572 

573 

574 
575 
576 

577 
578 

579 
580 

581 
582 
583 

584 
585 
586 
587 
588 

589 

590 
591 



Order. 
Myrtacese — The 

Nodding Gum 
Myrtacee 



Eucalyptus nutans (F. von 

Mueller) 
Eucalyptus occidentalis (End- 

licher) 
Eucalyptus pacHypoda (F. von MyrtacesB 

Mueller) 
Eucalyptus tetraptera (Turcs^ Myrtacese 

aninow) 
Eucalyptus viminalis (Labillar- 

di^re) 



Habitat. 
W. Aust. 

W. Aust. 

W. Aust. 

W. Aust. 



Exocarpus cupressiformis (La- 
billardi^re) 

Ficus rubiginosus (Desfontaines) 

Ficus macrophylla (Desfon- 
taines) 

Frenela robusta (A. Cunning- 
ham), variety microcarpa 

Fr. columellaris(F. von Mueller) 

Frenela robusta (A. Cunning- 
Ham) — Callitris crassivalvis 

Frenela rhomboidea (Endlicher) 

Frenela rhomboidea (Endlicher) 

variety Tasmanica 
Frenela Australis (Eobt. Brown) 
Fr. Gunnii (EndUcher) 
Frenela robusta (A. Cunning- 
ham), variety verrucosa 
Callitris verrucosa (Eobt. Brown) 
Gastrolobium bilobum (Robert 

Brown) 
Goodenia ovata (Smith) 
G<x)dia medicaginea (F. von 

Mueller) 
Grevillea Banksii (R. Brown) 
Grevillea pectinatii (R. Brown) 
Grevillea oleoides (Lieber) va- 
riety dimorpha (F. Mueller) 
Grevillea Hilliana (F* Mueller) 
Grevillea ilicifolia (R. Brown) 
Grevillea laurif blia (Sieber) . . . 
Grevillea linearis (R. Brown) 
Grevillea macrostylis (F. von 

Mueller) 
Grevillea robusta (A. Cunning- 
ham) 
Guichenotia ledifolia (J. Garz) 
Hakea acicularis (R. Bix)wn)... 



MyrtacesB — The Victoria 

Weeping Gum, 

Box, &c. 
Santalaoese — The Victoria 

Native Cherry 
TJrticesB 
UrticeaB — The Queensland 

Moreton Bay Fig <k N.S.W. 



Queensland 



> ConifersB 

ConifersB — The 

Murray Pine 
Coniferae — The 

Native Cypress 
Coniferse — The 

Oyster Bay Pine 
) Conifer» — The ) 
/ Tasmn. Cypress / 

I Coniferse — The 
Desert Pine 



N.S.Wales 
Victoria 
Victoi"ia 
Tasmania 



/ 



Leguminosje— The 
Poison Plant 
Goodeniace» 
Leguminos® 

Proteace« 
ProteacesB 
ProteacesB 

Proteaceae 
Proteace« 
Proteacese 
Proteacese 
ProteacesB 

ProteacesB — ^The 

Silky Oak 
SterculiacesB 
ProteacesB 



Tasmania 

Victoria 

W. Aust. 

Victoria 
Victoria 

Queensland 
W. Aust. 
Victoria 

Queensland 
Victoiia 
N. S. Wales 
N. S. Wales 
W. Aust. 

N. S. Wales 
& Qeensld. 
W. Aust. 
N.S. Wales 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 



45 



592 

593 

594 
595 
596 
597 
598 
599 
600 
601 
602 
603 
604 

605 

606 

607 
608 
609 
610 
611 

612 

613 

614 
615 
616 

617 

618 

619 

620 
621 
622 

623 

624 
625 

626 



Order. 
Hakea uUcina, variety caiinata Proteaceee 

(F. von Mueller) 
Hakea corymbosa (R. Brown) . . . Proteaoe» 
Hakea cuoullata (R. Brown) . . . Proteacesd 
Hakea cycloptera (R. Brown) . . . Proteacee 
Hakea elliptica (R. Brown) . . . Froteaoead 
Hakea flexilis (F. von Mueller) Proteaoen 
Hakea gibbosa (Cavanilles) . . . Proteaoesa 
Hakea laurina (Robt. Brown) .. Proteaoese 
Hakea leucoptera (Robt. Brown) Proteacese 
Hakeainicrocarpa(Robt. Brown) ProteaoesB 
Hakea nodosa (Robt. Brown)... Proteacese 
Hakea oleifolia (Robt. Brown).. Proteacese 
Hakea pugioniformis (Cava- Proteaoeas 

nilles) 
Hakea purpurea (Hooker) ... Proteaoen 
Hakea saligna (Knight) . . . Proteace» 



Habitat. 
S. Australia 

W. Aust. 
W. Aust. 
S. Australia 
W. Aust. 
Victoria 
N.S.Wales 
W. Aust. . 
Victoria 
Victoria 
Victoria 
W. Aust. 
Victoria 

Victoria 

Queensland 
<kN.S. Wales 

W. Aust. 

W. Aust. 

W. Aust. 

South Aust. 

Queensland 
<kN.S. Wales 

Victoria 



Queensland 
& N.S.Wales 
N.S.Wales 
W. Aust. 
W.Aust. 

Victoria 



Hakea suaveolens (Robt. Brown) Proteacese 
Hakea strumosa (Meissner) . . . Proteaoese 
Hakea verrucosa (F.vonMueller) Proteacese 
Hakea vittata (Robt. Brown)... ProteacesB 
Hibiscus splendens (Fraser) ... Malvacese — ^The 

Hollyhock tree 
Hymenanthera dentata (Robt. ViolaresB 

Brown) 
Hymenosporum flavum (F. von Pittosporese 

Mueller) 
Ipomcea sp. ... ... ... Convolvulacead 

Kennedya Comptoniana (Link) Leguminosffi 
Kennedya lateritia (F. von Leguminosse 

Mueller) 
Kennedya monophylla (Vente- Leguminosse— The 

nat) Native Saraaparilla 

Kennedya rubiconda (Vente- LeguminoBS Victoria 

nat) 
Kentia sapida — ^Areca sapida PahnesB — ^TheNikau N. Zealand 

(Solander) Pahn 

Kochia aphylla (R. Brown) ... Chenopodess 
Kunzea confolia (Reichenbach) Myrtaceie 
Kunzealeptospermoides (F. von Myrtacea ' 

Mueller) 
Lagunaria Patersonii (G. Don) Malvaceae — ^The 

Cow-itch Tree 
Lasiopetalum Baaeri (Steetz) Sterculiacee 
Lasiopetalum parviflorum Sterculiaceas 

(Rudge) 
Lasiopetalum Schtdzenii (Ben- Stercoliacese 

thain) 



Victoria 
Victoria 
Victoria 

Queensland 

Victoria 
Victoria 

Victoria 



48 



CATALOGUE OF THX 



687 Pu!kospennum jimiperixium 

688 Pu^mith) 

689 F^tospermum IsBvigatum (F. 

690 Pvon Mueller) 

691 ilieptospermum lanigerum . 
«<^*^ (Smith) 

630 Leptospermum myrsinoides 

(Schlechtendahl) 

631 Lkotzkya genetylloides (F. von 

Mueller) 

632 Lomatialoiigifolia(Kobt. Brown) 

633 Macrozamia sp. 

634 Macrozamia Perowskiana (Mi- 

guel) 

635 M. Denifionii (F. von Mueller) 

636 Marianthus bignoniaceus (F. 

von Mueller) 

637 Melaleuca armillaris (Smith) . . . 

638 Melaleuca decussata (B. Brown) 

639 Melaleuca densa (Robt. Brown) 

640 Melaleuca elliptica (Labillar- 

difere) 

641 Melaleuca ericifolia (Smith) ... 

642 Melaleuca geniatifolia (Smith).«. 



643 Melaleuca hjpericifolia (Smithy 

644 Melaleuca incana (Kobt. Brown) 

645 Melaleuca lateritia (Otto) 

646 Mdaleuca linariifolia (Smith) ..« 

647 Melaleuca micromera (Schauer) 

648 Melaleuca Preissiana (Schauer) 

649 Melaleuca pustulata (Hooker fil, ) 

650 Melaleuca styphelioidjes (Smith) 

651 Melaleuca tamariscina (Hooker) 

652 Melaleuca imcioata (Robert 

Brown) 

653 Melaleuca Wilsonii (F. von 

Mueller) 

654 Melicope temata (Forster) 

655 Myoporum dulce (Bentham) ... 

656 Myrsine d'Urvillei (De Can- 

doUe) 

657 Myrsine vairiabilis (Robert 

Brown) 



Order. 
Myrtaoee 

Myrtaoete*— The 
Coast Teartree 

MyrtacesB — ^Tbe 
Woolly Tea-tree 

MyrtacesB 

Myrtaoese 

Proteaoe» 
Cycadese 

Cyoadese 

Pittospoirese 



Habitat. 
Vidtoria 

Victoria 

Victoria 

Victoria 

Victoria 

Victoria 
Queensland 

Queensland 

Victoria 



Myrtaceae — Tea Victoria 

Tree 
Myrtaceee — Close- Victoria 

leaved Tea Ti-ee 
Myrtace^ W. Auat. 

Myrtaoefla W. Aust. 



Myrtaceae -^ 

Common Tea 



Myrtaceee 
M^rtaceiB 
Myrtaceae 
Myrtaceae 

Myrtaceee 
MyrtacesB 
Myrtaceae 
Myrtaceae 
Myrtaceae 
Myrtaceae 

Myrtaceae 



The Victoria 

Tree 

KS. Wales, 
N. Aust., & 
Queensland 
K S. Wales 
W. Aust. 
W. Aust. 
Queensland 
A;N.S.Wales 
W. Aust. 
Victoria 
Victoria 
N. S. Wales 
Queensland 
Victoria 

Victoria 



Rutaceae — Tataka N. Zealand 

Myoporineas Victoria 

Myrsineae N. Zealand 

Myrsineae *— The Victoria 
Smooth Beech 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. ^^ 

Order. ^*^w ^ 

658 Marsilea macropus ... ... Marsileacess-^Tlie f • "• Wales 

Nardoo f Queensld. 

658a Marsilea sp. The Native Ginger ^[ictoria 

659 Nephelium leiocarpum (F. von Sapindacea^ Qi 

Mueller) &N.*,v s 

660 Nesodaphne Tawa (Hooker, fil.) LaurinesB — The N. ZeSftarid 

Tawa 

661 Oxylobium callistachys (Ben- LegmninoBSB W. Aust. 

tham) 

662 Oxylobium lineare (Bentham) Leguminosse W. Aust. 

663 Fandanus Australis ... Fandaneae 

664 Fandanus pedunculatus ... Fandaness Queensland 
666 Fersonia rigida (Robt. Brown) Froteaceae Victoria 

666 Fhormium tenaz (Forster) ... Liliacese — ^TheFlax N. Zealand 

Lily, or N. Z. Flax 

667 Fittosporum Oolensoi (Hooker, Fittosporese N. Zealand 

fil.) 

668 Fittosporum crassifolium (Banks FittoBporeae-Tarata N. Zealand 

and Solander) 

669 Fittosporum eugenoides (A. Fittosporeae-Tarata N. Zealand 

Cunningham) 

670 Fittosporum phillyraeoides (De Fittosporeae Victoria 

CandoUe) 

671 Fittosporum revolutum (Aiton) Fittosporeae Victoria 

672 Fittosporum rhombifolium (A. Fittosporeae Queensland 

Cunningham) & N.S.W. 

673 Fittosporum tenuifoliiim Fittosporeae — ^Taw- N. Zealand 

(Banks and Solander) hiwhe 

674 ' Fittosporum undulatum (Ven- Fittosporeae — ^The Victoria 

tenat) Native Laurel 

675 Fomaderris elliptica (Labillar- Bhamneae Victoria 

di^re) 

676 Fomaderris lanigera (Sims) . . . Rhamneae N. S. Wales 

677 Fomaderris ligustrina (Sieber) Eiiamneae N. S. Wales 

678 Fomaderris phillyraBoides (Sie- Bhamneae N. S. Wales 

ber) 

679 Fomaderris racemosa (Hooker) Bhamneae Victoria 

680 Fomaderris vacciniifolia (Reis- Rhamneae Victoria 

seek) 

681 Frostanthera nivea (A. Cun- Labiatae — White Victoria 

ningham) Mint Tree 

682 Frostanthera rotundifolia (Robt. Labiatae — Mint Victoria 

Brown) Shrub 

683 Ftychosperma Alexandrae (F. Falmeae — The Queensland 

von Mueller) Alexandra Falm 

684 Ftychosperma sp. ... ... Falmeae Queensland 

685 Pultenaea Benthami (F. von Leguminosae Victoria 

Mueller) 

686 Fultenaeadaphnoide8(Wen)dland)Legumino88B Victoria 



/ 

* 
I 

.48 < CATALOGUE OF THE 

*« Order. Habitat 

687 Pu!lteiitta mollis (Lindley) ... LeguminosflB Yictoria 

» 688 Pultenaea rosea (F. von Mueller) Leguminosse Victoria 

; 689 Pydtensea scabra (Robt. Brown^ Leguminosae Victoria 

S 690 ^ulten8easubuinbellata(Hooker) L^uminosse Victoria 

\691 'Rulingiacorylifolia (Graham)... Sterculiacese W. Aust. 

"^A^ Bulingia pamiosa (Robt. Brown) Sterculiacese Victoria 

693 Bulingia parviflora (Endlicher) Sterculiacete W. Aust. 

694 Santalum acuminatum (A. De Santalaceae — Na- Victoria 

OandoUe) tive Quandong 

695 Santalum cygnorum (Miguel) . . , SantalacesB — The W. Aust. 

Western Austrln. 
Sandalwood 

696 Seaforthia elegans (Blume) ... Palmese Trop. Aust. 

697 Sentis rhynchocarpa (F. von MyoporinesB S. Aust. & 

Mueller) N.S. Wales 

698 Sida retusa (Linnaeus) . . . Malvacese — The Queensland 

Queensland Hemp & N. Aust. 

699 Solanum hystrix (Bobt. Brown) Solanese South Aust. 

700 Solanum laciniatum (R. Brown) Solaneae — ^TheKan- Victoria 

garoo Apple 

701 Sophora tetraptera (Alton) \ 

702 Edwardsia grandifiora (Salis* > Leguminosae NewZealnd 

bury) j 

703 Spondias pleiogyne (F. von Anacardiaceae — ^The Queensland 

Mueller) Native Hog Plum 

704 Sprengelia incamata (Smith) . . . Epacrideae Victoria 

705 SpyridLum glomeratum . . . Rhamneae — 

706 Spyridium parvifolium (F. von Rhamneae Victoria 

Mueller) 

707 Sterculia acerifolia (A. Cunning- Sterculiaceae — The N. S. Wales 

ham) Flame Tree) 

708 Sterculia diversifolia (G. Don) Sterculiaceae — The Victoria 

Native Bottle Tree 

709 Styphelia ericoides (Smith) ... Epacrideae Victoria 

710 Styphelia humifusa (Persoon)... Epacrideae — Native Victoria 

Cranberry 

711 Styphelia juniperina (Sprengel) Epacrideae Queensland 

&N. S.Wales 

712 Styphelia rufa (F. von Mueller) Epacrideae Victoria 

713 Styphelia Sonderi (F. von Epacrideae Victoria 

Mueller) 

714 Styphelia thymifolia ... Epacrideae — 

715 Stylidium soboliferum (F. von Stylidiae — ^The Na- Victoria 

Mueller) tive Stylewort 

716 Swainsona galegifolia (Robt. Leguminosae N. S. Wales, 

Brown) Queensland, 

& S. Aust. 

717 Swainsona Greyana(Lindley)... Leguminosae Victoria 

718 Swainsona procumbens (F. von Legominosae Victoria 

Mueller) 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 



49 



719 
720 



721 
722 

723 

724 

725 
726 

727 

728 
729 

730 
731 
732 

733 
734 
735 
736 
737 

738 

739 
740 
741 



742 
743 
744 
745 
746 
747 
748 
749 
750 
751 
752 

753 
754 



Order. 

Syncarpia laurifolia (Tenore).*. Myi*tace8e — ^The 

Turpentine Tree 

Tecoma Anstralis (B. Brown) Bignoniacese — 

Churchill Island 
Creeper 

Telopia truncata (Bobt. Brown) ProteaoesB 

Templetonia retusa (B. Brown) Leguminosse 

Thomasea purpurea (J. Gay) Sterculiacese 
Tnstania conferta (R. Brown) Myrtaceas 

Trymalium Billardieri (Fenzl) Rhamnece 
Tluyptomene Mitchelliana (F. M3rrtace» 

von Mueller) 
Veronica Andersonii (hybrid) Scrophularinese 
Veronica lobelioides ... ... Scrophularinese 

Veronica Hulkeana (F. von Scrophulaiineie 

Mueller) 
Veronica Derwentia (Andrews) Scrophularinese 
Veronica parvifloi'a ( Vahl) . . . Scrophularinese 
Xanthorrhoea arborea (Robt. liliacese — The 

Brown) Grass Tree . 

Xanthorrhoea Kingii ... ... Liliacete 

Zamia sp. ... ... ... Cycadese 

Zieria Smithii (Andrews) ... Rutacese 
Erythrsea Australis (R. Brown) G^ntianese 
Macrozamia Miguelii (F. von Cycadere 

Mueller) 
Podocarpus ferruginea (Don) ... Coniferce — Otago 

Black Pine 
Podocarpus excelsa ... ... Coniferse 

Mira salicifolia 

Melicytus i*amiflorus (Forster) ViolareaB — Ini-ini 



Habitat. 
N. S. Wales 
& Queensld. 
Victoria 



Tasmania 
S. and W. 
Australia 
W. Aust. 
Queensland 
<fe N.S.W. 
W. Aust. 
Victoria 

N. Zealand 

N. Zealand 

Victoria 

N.Zealand 

Victoria 



Queensland 
Victoria 
Victoria 
Queensland 

N. Zealand 

N. Zealand 
N. Zealand 
N. Zealand 



it 



99 



DIRECTOR OF BOTANIC GARDENS, Melbourne. 

Bark of Melaleuca ericifoHa (Common Swamp Tea Tree). 

squarrosa (Victorian Yellow Wood), 
genistifolia (Broom-leaved Tea Tree). 
Eucalyptus obliqua (Stringybark). 

,y fissilis (Messmate). 

Acacia pycnantha (Golden Wattle), 
dealbata (Silver Wattle), 
decurrens (Common Wattle). 
Pimelia axiflora (Currijong). 
Quercus suber (Cork Oak). 
Atherosperma moschata (Victorian Sassafras Tree). 

POLISHED WOOD. 

Acacia decurrens (Common Wattle). 
„ pycnantha (Golden Wattle). 



j> 



» 



50 CATALOGUE OF THK 

755 Acacia longifolia (Long-leaved Wattle). 

756 ;, retinodes 

757 ,, armata (Prickly Acacia). 

758 ,, saligna (Weeping Acacia). 

759 „ dealbata (Silver Wattle). 

760 Araucaria Ounninghamii (Moreton Baj Hoop Pine). 

761 „ Bidwilli (Bunya Bunya Pine). 

762 Bursaria spinosa (Prickly Box). 

763 Casuarina quadrivalvis (Drooping She-oak). 

764 ,y Suberosa (Cork Bark She-oak). 

765 Callitris rhomboidea (Native Cypress). 

766 „ var. Tasmanica (Oyster Bay Pine). 

767 Acacia melanoxylon (Blackwood). 

768 Dammara robusta (Queensland Kauri). 

769 Duboisia myoporoides (Cork Wood). 

770 Elseocarpus cyaneus. 

771 Eucalyptus corynocalyx, 

772 „ comuta. 

773 „ Occidentalis. 

774 Exocarpus cupressiformis (Native Cherry;. 
776 Eicus macrophylla (Moreton Bay Fig). 

776 Grevillea robusta (Silky Oak). 

777 Hakea accicularis. 

778 „ flexilis. 

779 „ pugioniformis. 

780 „ ulicina (Native Furze). 

781 „ saligna. 

782 „ oleifolia. 

783 ,, laurina. 

784 „ suaveolens. 

785 „ cuculeata. 

786 Hymenanthera Banksii. 

787 Leptospermum Isevigatum (Coast Tea Tree). 

788 Lagunaria Patersoni (Norfolk Island Cowitch Tree). 

789 Melaleuca armillaris (Tea Tree). 

790 „ decussata (Tea Tree). 

791 ,, ericifolia (Common Swamp Tea Tree). 

792 „ squarrosa (Victorian Yellow Wood). 

793 „ uncinata (Tea Tree). 

794 Myoporum insulare (Blueberry Tree). 

795 Notelsea ligustrina (White Plum Wood). 

796 Oxylobium callistachys. 

797 Panax sambucifolius (Elderberry Ash). 

798 Pittosporum undulatum (Native Laurel). 

799 „ phillyrsBoides. 

800 „ bicolor (White Wood). 

801 Pomaderris apetala (Native Hazel). 

802 Tristania conferta. 

803 Bedfordia salicina (Victorian Cotton Tree). 

804 Acacia juniperina (Prickly Wattle). 



IirrERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 61 

805 Banksia Australis (Honeysuckle). 

806 Hedycarya Cunninghamii (Smooth Holly, or NadTe Mulberry.) 

807 Leptospermum lanigerum (Woolly Tea Tree). 

808 Olearia argofAiylla (Native Musk). 

809 Prostanthera lasianthos (Dog Wood)« 

810 Alsophila Australis (Umbrella Fern). 

811 Dicksonia Antarctica (Common Tree Fern). 

812 „ squarrosa (Slender Tree Fern). 

813 Cassia aculeata. 

814 Atherosperma moschata (Sassafras Tree). 

815 Fagus Cunninghamii (Natiye Beech). 

816 Lomatia Fraseri (Native Holly). 

817 Coprosma hirtella (Native Woodbine). 

818 Myrsine variabilis (Smooth Beech). 

819 Sterculia acerifolia (Flame Tree). 

820 „ diversifolia (Victorian Bottle Tree). 

821 „ foetida. 

822 Leuoopogon ftichei (Currant Wood). 

823 Banksia integrifolia (Coast Honeysuckle). 

824 Acacia longifolia, var. sophorse (Coast Acacia). 

825 „ vertidllata. 

826 Helichrysum dnereum. 

827 Acacia mucronata. 

828 ,, stricta. 

829 Avicenna officinalis (Native Mangrove). 

830 Melaleuca Preissiana (Mountain Tea Tree). 

831 Casuarina distyla (Stunted Oak). 

832 Dodoncea viscosa, var. conferta, Phillip Island. 

833 Syncarpia laurifolia (Turpentine Tree, N.S.W.) 

834 Leptospermum scoparium. 

FROST, MARY, 17 Victoria-street, Melbourne. 

NEW ZEALAND FERNS. 

835 Pteris tremula. 

836 Pteris scaberula. 

837 Hymenophyllum polyanthos. 

838 Cyathea dealbata. 

839 Lomaria lanceolata (fertile fronds). 

840 Trichomanes reniforma. 

841 Lomaria discolor. 

842 Lomaria Fraseri (fertile.) 

843 Polystichum hispidum. 

844 Groniopteris permigera. 

845 Doodia media. 

846 Adiantum Cunninghamii 

847 Lomaria procera, var. sterile. 

848 Pellea falcta. 

849 Todea var. fertile. 

850 Adiantum othiopicum. 

851 Lomaria procera, var. fertile. 

s 2 



52 CATALOGUE OF THS 

852 Fteris Litrobochia toadkata. 

853 Nephrodiiim velutkim. 

854 Nephrodium deeomposituixu 

855 Cyuthea medullaris. . 

856 Lomaria lanceolata. 

857 Asplinium var. bulbiferum; 

GRIMWOOD, THOMAS, Fern Tree;^Gk[Uy Hotel 

858 Native Bread. 



HARDING, MRS., HUlas Bmlding, Clarence-street, Sydney, N.S.W. 

858a Cases New Zealand Ferns, jnounted. 
858b Books „ „ 

IRELAND, WM., 138 Bom-ke-street East, Melbourne. 
859 Native Plants. 

KENNEDY, JAMES, Fern Tree GuUy. 

861 Ferns. 

862 Native Bread. 

863 Supple Jack. 

864 Forest Shrubs, rare. 

SINCLAIR, MRS. ELLEN, Fitzroy Gardens, Melbourne. 

865 Nature-printed Ferns. 



Gkoup 7. r 

BASS RIVER STEAM SAW MILLS, Bass River; S. R. Groom, 

agent, 45 William-st. 

867 Bluegum Timber. 

BLACK, MRS. HELEN, Jolimont, Melbourne. 

868 Skeleton Leaves from Colonial Plants. 

BONETTI, GIUSEPPE, 130 Spring-street, Melbourne. 

869 Oval Oak Wine Cask. 

870 Samples of Coopering. 

CAUGHEY, A. <fe R, South Bank, Yarra, Melbourne. 

871 Oval Wine Cask, about 660 gallons, made of American white 

oak, imported specially for the purpose. 

872 Round Wine Cask, about 660 gallons ; made of American white 

oak, imported specially for the purpose. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 53 

COMMISSIONERS FOR PHILADELPHIA EXHIBITION, 

Melbourne. 

873 Victorian Blackwood Tubs ) 

874 Do. BluegumTubs > holding Fern Trees. 

875 Do. RedgumTubs j. 

876 Boxes of Native Woods, containing Exhibits of Grain. 

877 Pittosporum bicolor. 

878 Exocarpus cupressiformis (Cherry Xree). 

879 Hedycarya Cunninghami. 

880 Senecia BedfordL 

881 Acacia melanoxylon (Blackwood). 

882 Eucalyptus inophloia. 

884 Myrsine variabilis. 

885 Lomatia Fraserii 

886 Bastard Gum. 

887 Stringybark. 

888 Redgum Box, inlaid with Curly Blackwood, Victorian Rose- 

wood, Lomatia Fi'aserii, Pittosporum bicolor, <fec. 

FLETT, PETER, 120 Flinders-lane West, Melbourne. 

890 Oak Oval Wine Cask, 650 gallons. 

891 Oak Oval Ship's Harness Cask. 

892 Tasmanian Wattle Harness Cask. 

GRAY, WARING & CO., Princes Bridge, Melbourne. 

893 300-gallon Oval Wine Cask. 

894 112-gallon Oak Brewer's Clearing Puncheon. 

895 36-gallon Oak Brewer's Barrel, with patent bash. 

896 27-gallon Oak Brewer's Cask. 

897 13f gallon Oak Brewer's Cask. 

LANDS AND AGRICULTURE, DEPARTMENT OF, 

Melbourne. 

Woods fixjm the State Forests of Victoria: — 

898 Acacia melanoxylon (Blackwood). 

899 Acacia moUissima (Wattle). 

900 Atherosperma moschata (Sassafras). 

901 Banksia Australis (Honeysuckle). 

902 Bedfordia salicina (Cottontree). 

903 Callitris verrucosa (Murray Pine). 

904 Casuarina leptoclada (Erect Sheoak). 

905 . Casuarina qiiadrivalvis (Drooping Sheoak). 

906 Coprosma microphylla (Native Currant). 

907 Eucalyptus amygdalina (Whitegum). 

908 „ globulus (Bluegum). 

909 „ goniocaljrx (SVamp Gum). 

910 „ leucoxylon (Ironbark). 



54 



CATALOGUE OF THS 



911 
912 

913 
914 
915 
916 
917 
918 
919 
920 
921 
922 
923 
924 
925 
926 



99 



f> 



Enealyj^tos obliqna (Stringybark). 

(Messmate), 
rostrata (Redgum). 
Exocarpus cupressifoium (Native Cherry). 
Fagus Cunninghami (Australian Beech). 
Hedycarya Cunninghami (Smooth Holly). 
Lomatia Fraserii (Native Holly). 
Myrsine variabilis. 

Notelaea ligustrina (White-plum Wood). 
Olearia argophylla (Musk). 
Panax sambucifolia (Mountain Ash). 
Persoonia arborea (Red-plum Wood). 
Pittosporum bicolor (Cheesewood). 
Pomaderris apetala (Native Hazel). 
Prostanthera lasianthos. 

Tasmannia aromatica (Peppertree). 



LOUKES, THEODORE J., Albert-street, Daylesfoi-d. 
927 Fossil Specimens, contained in box of fossil wood. 



DEPARTMENT 3. 



AROMATIC, OLEAGINOUS, SAPONACEOUS, 
STIMULATING, AND NARCOTIC SUB- 
STANCES OF VEGETABLE GROWTH, 
PERFUMES, CHEMICALS, FERTILISING 
COMPOUNDS, VARNISHES, DYES, INKS, 
BLACKINGS, &c. 



C. R. Blackett, Esq., 

Chairman. 
Dr. John Blair. 
Thomas Broadbent, Esq. 
C. F. Creswell, Esq. 



EXPERTS. 

Dr. T. M. Girdlestone. 
William Hogarth, Esq. 
William Jomison, Esq. 
J. D. Kirkland, Esq. 
F. 0. Lange, Esq. 



Leslie A. Moody, Esq. 
J. Cosmo Newbeiy, Esq. 
C. T. Plunkett, Esq. 



PERFUMERY. 

The extraction of the scent from flowers by diBtillation, and the French 
mflev/rage process, are only carried on In lie colony of Victoria by one 
manufactuier, who has a laboratory in Melbourne. Considering kbw 



INTESCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 05 

rich we are in the article ci sweet-scented flowers and leayes, it seems 
somewhat remarkable that there should be only one expert devoting 
himself to a branch of industry supplying an article so universally in 
demand. 

The reason may perhaps be found in the fact that flower farming 
must be carried on to a large extent before perfumers can obtain their 
material in sufficient quantity, and considerable capital is required 
before floriculture can be made a lucrative business. The perfumer in 
question uses only native flowers in his business, and last summer pur- 
chased about half a ton of rose petals, which he distilled or salted down 
for future use. 

Roses are most useful in scent-making, as they are hardy, and will 
impart their scent to water, fat, or spirit. Most of the roses in the 
Melbourne market come from Northcote, whilst Heathcote and Geelong 
send in the greatest quantity of lavender. Tuber roses, jessamine, and 
violets are the most delicate flowers the perfumer has to handle, and 
their odour is extracted by the mfleu/rage process, which consists in pack- 
ing the fresh petals between glass plates coated with carefully prepared 
laixL The plates are laid in airtight boxes, and when the lard is suffi- 
ciently loaded with scent it becomes an article of commerce. 

The price at which odoriferous blossoms can be bought in Melbourne 
may be thus tabulated : — 

s. d. 
Ordinary roses ... ... ... ... 3 per lb. 

Lavender, about ... ... ... ... 2 

Orange blossoms... ... ... ... 2 6 

Violets ... ... ... ... 2 6 

Jessamine ... ... ... ... 2 6 

The tuber rose is so rare that a price can not be fixed to it. 

TOBACCO. 

There were in Victoria, at the close of the year 1874, 12 tobacco, 
cigar, and snuff manufactories, giving employment to 399 men and 11 
females. Four of the factories use steam-power. It is estimated that in 
Melbourne alone some 200 working hands are employed in cigar-making, 
and men's wages average from £1 10s. to £2 a week; boys and young 
})ersons earn from 4s. to 20s. per week. The hours of labour in the trade 
average eight. From returns that have been sent to the Commissioners, 
three tobacco manufacturers produced during the past year goods to the 
value of £33,280. In these three establishments 68 men and 66 young 
})ersons earn a living. For the year ending March, 1875, 6839 cwt. 
of tobacco were produced, and 733 acres were under cultivation. 

SUGAR REFINING. 

There were two Victoiian sugar refineries, both of which employ steam 
to the extent of 610 horse-power, and give employment to 270 men. The 
value of the plant and machinery used is £80,000; of the land upon 
which the refineries are erected, £8000; and of the buildings, £75,000. 



99 



56 CATALOQUB OF THE 

A short time ago, the Yictoria Sugar Company's works at Sandridge 
caught fire, and at present the bare walls alone remain. The proprietai'y 
of the destroyed sugar refinery are now carrying on its business at the 
Yarraville works, which have passed into their hands. 

CHEMICAL WORKS. 

Of chemical works the colony possesses eight, three of which are 
worked by steam. They employ 41 hands. The machinery and plant 
is valued at £8100; the land covered by these mills is worth £3500; 
and the buildings, £5710. The Commissioners have received returns 
from the owners of chemical works, showing that the aggregate value of 
merchandise turned out last year was about £40,000. The hands em- 
ployed in the works from which returns have come in number 17 men, 5 
women, and 3 young people, and the wages earned range from £1 16s. a 
week to £3 for men, 15s. for women, and 10s. for young persons. The 
articles produced in these factories include sulphuric, nitric, and muriatic 
acids, soft soap, sheepdip, &c.; they also prepare chemicals and drugs 
generally, 

SALT. 
There are five salt works in the colony, employing 29 hands. 

FERTILISING COMPOUNDS. 

For the manufacture of bone-dust, and artificial manures made there- 
from, fourteen steam-nulls are at work. The horsepower of the united 
engines is 170, and 121 men are employed in the works. The value of 
the plant is £10,635, the land £8055, and the buildings £11,775. 
One factory turned out in 1874 bone-dust and animal guano worth 
£20,500; and another, during the same period, ground bone-dust to the 
value of £2000. 

ESSENTIAL OILS. 

The statistical returns for the year 1873-4 give four manufactories 
producing essential oils. One of these distillers makes oil worth £1500 
per annum, and employs eight men, who are paid at the rate of 35s. 
per week. The oil is mostly extracted from Eu^ypti, which, in various 
varieties, constitute our forests. The gum-trees of Australia are, as is 
well known, rich in gums, oils, and essences, possessing valuable 
medicinal and wound-healing properties, the value of which is beginning 
to be fully recognised by the medical profession both here and in 
Europe. 

The pioneer in the manufacture of these essential oils is Mr. Bosisto, 
M.P., of Richmond, who has devoted years to the pursuit, and by 
bringing his large experience to bear, has been able to arrive at the 
most satisfactory results. His chief products are : — Essential Oil from the 
Eucalypt%L8 globulus, or blue gum. This is an antiseptic stimulant and 
anthelmintic. EucaJyptol, for inhalation in bronchial and throat afiec- 
tions. This is obtained from the essential oil, and is a homologue of 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 57 

camplior. Eucalpytic Acid, ordixiary strength and concentrated, a 
volatile obtained by fractional distillation, most abundant in the blue 
and red gum. Liquor Eucalypti Globuli, antiperiodic; this is a bitter 
tonic, obtained from the leaves of the tree in an amorphous condition. 
It is an ague remedy, and appears to counteract malaria without exerting 
the prejudicial eflfects of quinine on the nervous system. Cigarettes, 
made £rom blue-gum, ai'e used as a disinfectant in bronchial and 
asthmatic affections. Essential Oil made from the peppermint-gum; 
this oil is known as the Eucalyptus Oil, and is employed in rheumatic 
affections and in the manufacture chiefly of perfumeiy, soaps, &c. It is 
an agreeable and excellent disinfectant if mixed with sawdust in the 
proportion of four ounces of oil to the bushel. Essential Oil from the 
Mallee scrub, employed chiefly in the manufactiu^ of oil and spirit 
varnishes. Varnishes containing the oil in the place of spirit of 
turpentine ai*e said neither to bloom nor crack. Essential Oil from the 
Mallee scrub is a perfect solvent of indiarubber. Potashes may be 
obtained fix)m the Mallee scnib, after its volatile oil has been extracted. 
Inspissated Juice of the Red-gum of Victoria, an astringent and tonic 
employed successfully in cases of dysenteiy and diarrhoea in the form of 
syrup. Essential oUs are also obtained from the messmate, apple tree, 
white-gum, ironbark-gum, peach-gum, and the scented gum of Queens- 
land. These oils will show the variety of aromas existing in the 
EucalyptL The Eucalypti, besides possessing those properties met with 
as general constituents of ligneous vegetation, possess a tannate gum 
i-esin, a volatile acid, and a volatile oil of eucalyptic origin. The first 
two are to be found in most parts of the tree, but the last-named only in 
the leaves. The blue-gum yields a continued steady supply of oil 
throughout the year; but when the ti-ee is extra resiniferous the acid is 
abundant and the oU small in quantity. The i-ed-gum produces a very 
small quantity of oil, but the volatile acid is very abundant, so much so 
that the i^-gum wood owes its aroma entirely to this add. The iron- 
bark supplies oil abundantly; but the leaf siufSeu^e on each tree is small 
in comparison with other species. Here the resin is so abundant that 
the bark is eveiywhere studded with gum resin. It has been demon- 
strated that the Eucalyptus oils absorb atmospheric oxygen, transforming 
it into peroxide of hydrogen. 

Amongst the products obtained by Mr. Bosisto from other indige- 
nous trees and plants ai*e Essential Oil from the bark of the native 
Sassafras. This oil is said to exert a specific lowering influence on the 
heart's action; and also Antherospermine, an alkaloid obtained from the 
bark, which also yields a volatile oil, very bitter. . Fi'om the Muskti'ee 
is obtained a brilliant colour called soap-green. Kesin is also obtained 
in quantity from under the pines growing* on ridges in the Mallee 
country. A i-esin is also obtained from the Grasstree of Australia. 
This is soluble in spirit, and is of a deep amber colour, and is obtainable 
in laige quantities. It is employed in staining wood to imitate cedar. 

Successful experiments have also been made with non-indigenous 
plants and trees. Opium has been obtained from the Sleeping Poppy, 
cultivated in Gippsland, and an Essential Oil has been distilled from the 
English Peppermint, which likewise is cultivated in Gippsland. 



1 
^ 



58 CATALOGUE OF THB 

CONFECTIONERY. 

A good demand exists for Colonial Confectionery, and the skill sharwih 
in its manufacture is considerable. There are six confectionery estab- 
lishments in Victoria, five of which use steam-power. They give em- 
ployment to 158 hands, 145 men and 13 women. The value of the 
plant and machinery is £8750, of the land £3550, and of the buildings 
£8700. The aggregate wholesale value of the manufactures produced 
in 1874 amounted to £62,900. Some idea of the magnitude of this, 
industry will be gained when it is stated that one factory employs 47 
hands — 19 men, 6 women, and 22 young i)ersons; the value of the 
goods produced in 1874 being £26,000. In this establishment the men 
work 9 hours, and the rest of the employes 8; the wages are — men 40s., 
women 10s,, young persons 7s. per week. A second establishment 
turned out with 42 hfuids — 25 men, 2 women, and 15 young persons — ^in 
1874 goods to the value of £14,500. The working hours are 53 per 
week, and the wages are — ^men 45s., women 15s., young persons 12s. per 
week. Another employs 36 hands — 14 men, 2 women, and 20 young 
persons, who work 10 hours per day, earning — ^men £3, women 8s., 
young persons 9s. per week. The wholesale value of the manufactures 
produced in 1874 was £11,000. The remaining factories employ hands 
varying in number from 11 to 18, and wages average, for men, from £2 
to £2 14s. per week. The wholesale value of the work turned out in 
1874 ranged from £1200 to £6000. 

EXPLOSIVE COMPOUNDS. 

There are in this colony four factories where blasting powder is made. 
These give employment to thirteen people, who, on an average, earn 
wages according to the following scale — ^men £2, women 15s., and young 
people 10s. 

It is only natural that in a mining country where hard rock is preva- 
lent, the attention of chemists should be given to explosive compounds. 
The advance made by science of late yea^rs in Europe with respect to the 
most powerful destructive force that can be packed in a small space, has 
resulted in the manufacture of a large amoiuit of explosive material that 
can at present be imported and sold at so cheap a rate, notwithstanding 
the danger of transit, as to give little encouragement to Austrahans 
who desire to compete with the home market. We have close to 
Melbourne a volcanite fsictory, where a rock-tearing compound, which 
gives forth no smoke on explosion, is made, and in the manipulation of 
this article twelve persons are employed, at wages averaging from lOs. to 
£2. The mill turns out per week three tons of volcanite, at £84 per 
ton. Nitro-glycerine compounds are being manufactured in the colony 
upon a small scale. 

An idea of the importance of this industry may be, however, to a cer- 
tain extent arrived at when it is stated on sound authority that a manu- 
factory, situate on the bank of the Yarra, turned out during the financial 
year ending December, 1874, fuse, &c., valued at £9000. The wages in 
this factory are per man £2, and boys 12s. The number of hands 
employed is 19. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION^ 1875. 59* 

DYE WORKS. 

The number of dye works in Victoria is 16. Three only use steam- 
l>ower, and the total number gives a means of living to 47 males and 36 
females. These establishments occupy land valued at £6000, and have 
2)lant worth £2805. The places of business are valued at £9060. The 
value of the dyeing trade cannot be given here, as the Commissioners 
have only been placed in possession of special information by one dyer, 
who, wiih. five assistants, realised by his work last year the satisfactory 
sum of £1248. The colouring matter used in this trade is nearly all 
imported. 

VARNISHES, PAINTS, PIGMENTS, GUMS, AND RESINS. 

There is only one wholesale establishment in the colony where var- 
nishes, enamels, and paints are prepared, and in this workshop none 
(with one exception) but imported materials are used. The exception 
alluded to is white zinc, which can be made here from scraps, and 
profitably. 

The gentleman who has provided the Commissioners with information 
relative to this branch of trade has invented a patent composition for 
coating the bottoms of iron ships, and the preparation is most favourably 
spoken of by nautical men. The Cerberus is coated with the enamel in 
question, and her commander. Captain Panter, R.N., has publicly stated 
that he thinks it the best he has seen out here. This manufacturer 
employs 10 skilled artizans, who can earn per week from £2 10s. up to 
£6 ; exports to the several Australian colonies yearly ship-coating enamel 
to the value of about £2000; and also does a large trade in prepared 
colours and carriage varnishes. 

VINEGAR, INK, AND BLACKING. 

We have in the colony three vinegar works, employing 10 persons. 
The value of the plant and machinery in these is £1500, and the build- 
ings where the industry is carried on are worth about the same amount. 
The Commissioners have been put in possession of data showing that the 
three factories produced in 1874 vinegar to the value of about £4000 
wholesale. 

Two manufacturers in Victoria who combiue vinegar-brewing with ink 
and blacking making, give £11,388 as the result of their labour for year 
ending December, 1874. These two employers give work to 16 persons, 
whose wages range from 10s. to £4 per week. It should here be 
stated that the total number of ink and blacking factories in the colony 
is 7, in which 56 persons are engaged. Two of these are worked by 
steam. 



Group 9. 

DIRECTOR OF TfiE BOTANIC GARDENS, Melbourne. 
928 Roots of Kennedya monophylla (Native Sarsapanlla). 



60 CATALOGUE OF TH£ 

DUDGEON & ARNELL, 125, 127, 129 Lonsdale-street, Melbourne. 

931 Tobacco, maauflELctured and umuajiufactured. 

932 Sniiff. 

HARPER, ROBERT, & CO., 5 Flinders^treet E^t, Melbourne. 

933 Coffee, manufactiired and unmanufactured. 

934 Spice, „ „ 

935 Oatmeal, „ ,, 

936 Rice, „ „ 

937 Chicory. 

938 Mustai-d. 
938a Chocolate. 

HEINECKE & FOX, Swanston-sti-eet, Melbourne. 

939 Tobacco, manufactiu'ed in the colony. 

940 Snuff, manufactured in the colony. 

MCKENZIE, JAMES F., & CO., Queen-street, Melbouxne. 

941 Coffee. 

942 Chicory. 

943 Oatmeal. 

944 Feasmeal. 

945 Mustard. 

946 Spices. 

947 Maizemeal. 

948 Groats. 

949 Cocoa. 



Group 10. 

ABORIGINAL CHURCH OF ENGLAND MISSION STATION, 
Lake Tyers, Gippsland. John Bulmer, Missionary. 

960 Arrowroot, manufactured from the Tous-les-mois plant. 

ABORIGINAL MISSION STATION, Lake milington, Gipi>sland. 

F. A. Hagenauer, Missionary. 

951 Arrowroot, manufactured from the Tous-les-mois plant. 

AITKEN, CHARLES AGER, 43 Errol-street, Hotham. 

952 Quinine Wine (Quinine and Victorian wine). 

AUSTRALIAN MANUFACTURING CO. (Limited), 297 and 299, 

Brunswick-street, Fitzroy. 

953 Baking Powder. 

954 Washmg Powder. 



INTERCOLONIAL SXHIBITION, 187$. 81 

955 Blacking. 

956 SeicUitz Powder. 
965 Cuny Powder. 

BA60T, K M., Adelaide, South Australia, 

968 Extract of Meat (South Aostraliaii), dried into sheets, and put 

into paper packets. 

BILNEY, M. A., & SONS, Aihelstone, near Adelaide, South AiistmliH. 

969 Tomato Sauce. 

970 Catsup. 

971 Cayenne Pepper. 

972 Large Bowl Cayenne Pepper. 

BODDY, EDWARD, Nagambie. 

973 Fine Flour. 

BURKITT, E. S., Kingston, Lacepede Bay. 

974 Salt, from Salt Creek, Yorke's Peninsula, refin(5d by exhibitor . 

BITRGE, S. B., Goulbum, New South Wales. 

975 Baking Powder. 

CHANCE, L. A., Unley, South Australia. 

976 Assorted Pickles. 

977 Assorted Jams. 

978 West India Sauce. 

979 Mushroom Catsup. 

980 Prince of Wales Sauce. 

981 Tomato Sauce. 

CLAREIE, 8. A., & CO., Brunswick and Wc*stgatth strfjets, Fitarny. 

982 Chutney. s 

983 Curry Powder. 

984 Picklea 

985 Sauces. 

COHEN k LEVY, Tamworth, New South Wah^. 

986 Flour. 

COLE, WILLIAM, & SOX, ToT/vigo, fy^wr r ffiir.vr IVivfv, y!/H/\V, 

987 Arrowroot. 

COMPORT, HENRY, r;ii^lt> ;J,.,n,, 
083 Tomato Sauce, iHAivxiAfXnvfA by f;xLibiV/n 



62 CATALOGUE OF THE 

COWAN, JAMES, & CO., Two Wells, Adelaide, South Australia. 

989 Superfine Silk-dressed Flour. 

CUNLIFF, ELIAS, 219 Bourke-street East^ Melbourne. 

990 Jams and Mannalade. 

DAVIS, F. C, Fnlham, Adelaide, South Australia. 

991 Bottled Fruits. 

DILLON & BURROWS, Latrobe-fitreet West, Klelbourae. 

992 Confectionery. 

' DIRECTOR OF THE BOTANIC GARDENS, Melbourne. 

993 Jam made from Kaii Apples. 

DUNCAN, ALEXANDER, 18 and 20 Bourke^itreet East^ Melboui^nc. 

994 Wedding Cake. 

DUNN, JOHN, & CO., Adelaide. 

995 Flour. 

EDWARDS & EASTERBY, Howlong, New South Wales. 

996 Flour. 

FRY, J. S., & SONS, Bristol, England ; per Wm. Crosby & Co., 

Queen-street, Melbourne. 
996a Caracas Cocoa. 

GUEST, T. B., & CO., WiUiam-street, Melbourne. 

997 Fancy Biscuits. 

GRANT, MRS., Bridge-street, Richmond. 

998 Tomato Sauce, manufactured by exhibitor. 

GUTHEIL, BUTTNER & CO., Chapel-street, Prahran. 

999 Malt Pickling Vinegar. 

HAMMER, JOHN, Adelaide, South Australia. 

1000 Tomato Sauce. 

HARDY, THOMAS, Bankside Vineyard, South Australia. 

1001 Pickled OUves, 1874. 

HARROP, JOB, Broadway, Dunolly. 
1001a Preserved Fruits. 

HOGG, SAMUEL P., & CO., 24 Collins-street West, Melbourne. 

1002 Curry Powder, " Sun, Moon, and Stars." 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 63 

HOOD, T. & J., 81 Eluabeih-etreet Korih, Mdbourne. 

1003 Yictorian-made Malt 

HUNT, A. M., <fe CO., Goulbum, New South Wales. 

1004 Baking Powder. 

KENSINGTON MAIZENA AND STABCH COMPANY. 

1005 Starch. 

1006 Maizena. 

KERSLAKE, RICHARD, Auckland, New Zealand. 

1007 Curry Powder. 

1008 Preserved Mushrooms. . 

1009 Preserved Tomatoes. 

LAVIN, JOHN, North-parade, Port Adelaide, South Australia. 

1011 Ship Biscuits. 

1012 PUot Biscuits. 

1013 Cabin Biscuits. 

1014 Navy Biscuits. 

LAURIE, ALEXANDER T., Rawdon Vale, near Gloucester, N.S.W. 

1015 Arrowroot, from the Canna edulis. A very productive and 

profitable crop. Two tons of the manufactured article 
obtained from one acre. Grown and manufactured by 
exhibitor. 

LEVY BROTHERS <fe CO., Oole's-lane, Little Collins-street, Melbourne. 

1016 Baking Powder. 

1017 Curry Powder. 

1018 Quinine Wine. 

LEWIS BROTHERS, Tamworth, New South Wales. 

1019 Flour. 

LEWIS & WHITTY, Charles-street, Pitzroy. 

1020 Washing Powder. 

1021 Baking Powder. 

1022 SeidHtz Powder. 

1023 Curry Powder. 

1024 Blacking. 

1025 BaU Blue. 

1026 Knife Polish. 

1027 Hair Oils, Perfumed. 

1028 Culinary Essences, <kc. 

ML'EWIN, GEORGE, & SON, Glen Ewin, near Haughton, Adelaide, 

South AiTsti*alia. 

1029 Jams. 



64 CATALOGUE OF THE 

P. J. MARTIN, Little Flinders-Bti-eet East, Melbourne. 

1030 Victorian Malt. 

MAGAREY & CO., Adelaide, South Australia. 

1031 Superfine Eloiu*. 

MILWARD, J., High-street, St. Kilda. 

1031a Preserved Fruits, Jellies, Jams^ Marmalade. 
1031b Preserved Fruits in Syrup. 

MONK, D. J., 251 Sussex-street, Sydney, New South Wales. 

1032 Malt Vinegar. 

MUNN, A. L., Merimbula, New South Wales. 

1033 Maizena. 

MYRING, JOSEPH, Standard Brewery, Campbell Creek, Castlemaine. 

1034 Malt (Colonial). 

OAKDEN, RICHARDS & CUTHBERT, Sugar Plantera, Fiji; 
office: 91 Little Collins-street West, Melbourne. 

1035 Arrowroot, from Fiji. 

PERRIN, WILLIAM (Junior), Stephenson-street, Richmond. 

1036 Victorian Malt, made from Victorian and New Zealand grown 

barley. 

REED, HENRY, & CO., Chapel-street, South Yaxra. 

1037 Samples of Vinegar. 

RICHARD, SAMUEL, & SONS, Devil's Creek, Dean. 

1038 Farina. 

1039 Products of the Potato. 

RUDD, E., & CO., 3 Evelyn-street East, Melbourne. 

1040 Tomato Sauce. 

SLOANE, WM., & CO., Hall of Commeixje. 

1041 Four samples of Sugar, the produce of Mackay District, Queens- 

land. 

SMITH & SON, Miller and Anderson streets, West Melbourne. 

1042 Machine and Fancy Biscuits, etc. 

STRACHAN & CO., 1 Sandridge-road, Princes Bridge,^Melbomiie. 

1043 Confectionery. 

1044 Sugar. 

1045 Lozenges, Medicated and others. 



INTERCOLOKIAI. KEBDUTIONy 1875. 6S 

STRIN6BR & CO., 43 and 45 King^stareet, Melbourne. 

1046 Pickles. 

1047 Sauces. 

1048 Currie Powder. 

1049 Baking Powdei-. 

SOTJTH AUSTRALIAN JAM CO. (Limited), Adelaide, South 

Australia; J. Hammer, Secretaiy. 

1050 Jams, 1 lb. packages. 

1051 Jams, 2 lb. packa^s. 

SWALLOW & ARIELL, Sandridge and Melbomne. 

1052 Biscuits. 

1053 Cake^. 

1054 Flour. 

TONG, W. S., 4 Western Market, Melbourne. 

1055 Jams. 

1056 WOTcester Sauce* 

YOUNG & CO., Riverwstreet, Richmond. 

1057 Maizena. 

1058 Starch. 

VENESS, EDWARD, Upper Macedon. 

1059 Jams. 

WATERS, JAMES, Ravensdale,Wyong Creek, Brisbane Water, N.S.W. 

1060 Arrowroot. 

WATSON BROTHERS, Young, New South Wales. 

1061 Flour. 

WRIGHT, PAYNE & CO., Chapel-street, Soutli Yarra. 

1062 Jams, 1 lb. and 2 lb. tins; Honey, 1 lb. tins; Jams in jars. 

ZORN, EDWARD, Clayton's-road, near Oakleigh. 

1063 Tomato Sauce. 

1064 Sauces (Collection of). 

1065 Preserves. 

1066 Concombres a FAllemagne. 

1067 Cel6ri de TEurope. 

1068 Ed. Zom's Qakleigh Sauce. 



Group 11. 

ANDRESEN, L. C, 35 Market-street, Melbourne. 

1069 Samples Wash Composition. 

1070 Samples Inks. 

1071 Chemical Preparations. 



F 



CATAL04H7B 09 7HK 

BELL, H., Sydm^y, Ndw South Walea 

1072 Bone Flour. 

BOSISTO, JOSEPH, Bridge-road, Richmond. 

Chemical and Pharmaceutical Preparations obtained from the Eucalyptus 
and other Indigenous Vegetation, pv^pared and exhibited by Joseph 
Bosisto, Bridge-road, Bichmond: — 

EUCALYPTUS VEGETATION. 

1073 Essential Oil, Eucalyptus globulus (Blue Gum). Antiseptic 

stimulant and anthelmintic. 

1074 Eucalyptol, Eucaljptus globulus (Blue Gum). For inhalation in 

bronchial and throat affections. Obtained from 'the essential 
oil, and is a homologue of camphor. 

1076 Eucalyptic Acid, ordinary strength, ( Jolatileobti^nablebyfi^c- 
Eucalyptnsglobulus (Blue Oumj } 'T'i ^'"*'"fi'*'S^"**1 

1076 Eucalyptic Acid? concentrated (S^*^"'^ ?^ ^"' 

1077 Liquor Eucalypti globuli, Eucalyptus globulus (Blue Gum). Anti- 

periodic. The tonic or bitter principle obtained £rom the 
leaves of the tree in an amorphous condition. An ague remedy. 
It appears to counteract malaria without exerting the pre- 
judicial effects of quinine on the nervous system. 

1078 Cigarettes, Eucalyptus globulus (Blue Gum). Disinfectant em- 

ployed in bronchial and asthmatic affections. 

1079 Essential Oil, Eucalyptus amygdalina odorata (Peppermint Gum). 

Bubefacient and disinfectant. This oil is generally known as 
the "Eucalyptus Oil," employed externally in rheimiatic 
affections, and in the manufactories chiefly for perfumeiy, 
soaps, &c. An excellent and very agreeable disinfectant if 
mixed with sawdust in the proportion of four ounces of oil 
to the bushel. 

1080 Ointment, Eucalyptus amygdalina odorata (Peppermint Gum). 

1081 Essential Oil, Eucalyptus oleosa (Mallee Scrub). Employed 

chiefly in the manufactm*e of oil and spirit vamislies. 
Varmsh contaixiing this oil in the place of spirits of tuqien- 
tine is said neither to bloom nor crack. It is a perfect solvent 
of indiarrubber without heat. 

1082 Indiarrubber with the Essential Oil, Eucalyptus oleosa (Mallee 

Scrub). Showing the two in combination. 

1083 Potashes, Eucalyptus oleosa (Mallee Scrub). Obtained from tin* 

scrub after being deprived of its volatile oil. 

1084 Essential Oil, Eucal3rptus rostrata (Red Gum of Victwia). 

1085 Inspissated Juice, Eucalyptus rostrata (Bed Gum of Victoria). 

Astringent and tonic. Employed successfully in cases of 
dysentery and diarrhoea, in the form of a syrup. 

1086 Essential Oil, Eucalyptus fissilis (Messmate) V specimen s«m- 
1*087 „ Eucalyptus Stuartiana (Appletree ( pie« ehowinK the 

" n„«,\ > variety of Aroma 

y^^^^) i existing in the 

1088 „ Eucalyptus goniocalyx (White Gum) ) B^caiyptL 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 67 

1089 Essential Oil, iucalyptns siddrixylon ^(R^ottUdit ) * • 

Gum) . ■ /. i fti^ohnen 8ato> 

1090 „ Eucalyptus pemcifolia (Pea^h. Gum) >viS£7^ofiSoma 

1091 „ Eucalyptus citriodora (Sweet-scented ( S^ltJ" ^ 

Gum, Queensland) ) 

INDIGENOUS. 

1092 Essential Oil, Atherosperma moschatum (iN^aidve Stassld^). 

Diaphoretic, diuretic an4 sedative. Obtained from the bark, 
it exerts a specific lowering influence on the heart's action. 

1093 Atherospermine, Atherosperma moBckatum (Native Sassalras). An 

alkaloid obtained from the bark. 

1094 Salts of Lime, Atherosperma moschatum (Native Sassafras). 

Obtained from the bark. 

1095 Bark, Atherosperma moschatum (Native Sassalras)^ 

1096 Essential Oil, Melaleuca ericifblia (Teatree)/ 

1097 Sap Green, Eurybia argophylla (Musktree), A brilliant green. 

1098 Resin, Pinus callitris (Murray Pine). Obtaihable in quantity 

from under the pines growing on ridges in the Malleo' coilmtry. 

1099 Resin, Xanthorrhoea Australis (G^asistree of Australia). Soluble 

in spirit, of a deep ^uuber coloul*, obtainable in large quan- 
tities; employed for staining wood to imitate oedar. 

l^ON-INDIGENOUS, 

1100 Opium, Papaver somnifera (Sleeping Poppy). Cultivated in 

Gippsland, Victoria. • 

1101 Morphia, from the Gippsland Opiimi. 

1102 Capsules, Papaver somnifera (Sleeping Poppy), Specimens of 

Gippsland growth. 

1 103 Essential Oil, Mentha Piperita (English Peppermdnt). Cultivated 

in Gippsland, ckhd distilled by exhibitor four years tigo. 

COLLIN6W00D POUDRETTE & AMMONIA CO.; office^ CoUins- 

street East, Melbourne. 

1104 Poudrette (Guano) and Ammonia, manufactured from nightsoil. 

GUMMING, SMITH & CO., 102 Collins-street West, Melbourne. 

1105 Samples Sulphuric Acids. 

1106 „ Nitric Acids. 

1107 „ Muriatic Acids. 

1108 „ Salts of Ammonia. 

1109 „ Soda Sulphate. 

DAY, DR. JOHN, Yan-arstreet, Geelong. 

1109a Specimens of Wood, which have been rendered almost peima- 
nently disinfectant by a very simple and inexpensive process, 
which may readily be applied to the flooring of hospitals, 
schools, &c, 

f2 



70 CATALOGUS OF THE 

NORBIS, T. W., Chapel-street, Prabran. 

1179 Horse Medicines. 
IISO Cattle Medicines. 



Group 13. 

BELL <k CO., Gipps-street, CoUingwood. 

1181 Wax Vestas. 

KITCHEN, J., & SONS, 28 Flinders-lane West, Melbourne. 

1182 Stearine Candles, manufactured by exhibitors. 

PETERS, EDWIN FRANCIS, Dundly. 

1185 Soap. 

1186 Candles. 

SMITH, ALEXANDER, 29 Flinders-lane West, Melbourne. 

1187 Soap, Yellow, Fancy, Mottled. 

1188 Soft Soap. 

1189 Tallow Candles. 

SWAIM & CO., Pai-ramatta, New South Wales. 

1190 Excelsior New Dry Soap, for cleansing clothes, floors, paint, glass, 

marble, and all other domestic piu'poses without the aid of 
soda crystals, and half the quantity of soap generally used 
and one-tenth part of the labour, without injury to the hands 
or fabrics. 

TILLY & CLACK, Sm-vey-road, South Yan-a. 

1191 Toilet Soaps and Violet Powder, &c. 



Group 14. 

ANDRESEN, L. C, 35 Market-street, Melbourne. 

1192 Glue. 

1193 Varnish. 

AUSTRALIAN MANUFACTURING. CQ. (Limited), 297 and 299 

Biiinswick-street, Fitzroy. 

1194 Hair Oil. 

1195 Castor Oil. 

1196 Castor Oil, for lubricating purposes. 

1197 Salad Oil. 

BARNARD, G. L., Bardini, Walkerville, South AuatwOia* 

1198 OHveOn. 



INTEBCOIiOiriAlf HHXQiTJOV, 1 87 5. {fi 

BELL, H., Sydney, New South Wales. 

1199 NeatsfootOU. 

BORTHWICK, ALEXANDER, 36 MarkeUtreet, Melbourne. 

1200 Yamiskes, maniifa.ctured by the Victoria Varnish Company. 

1201 Anti-fouling Compositions for ships* bottoms, patented by ex- 

hibitor. 

1202 Caalriron Pedestal Pillars, enamelled by exhibitor's process. 

BOWMAN, JOHN, M.A., 31 Bnssell^street, Melbourne. 

1 203 Colonial Crayons, made principally from colonial clays, containing 

600 shades. 
1 203a Tray of Colonial Clays for Crayons. 

CHANCE, L. A., XJnley, South Australia. 

1204 OHve OH. 

CHILES, SAMUEL, Unte's Park, South Australia. 

1205 Salad Oil. 

DAVENPORT, SAMUEL, Beaumont, South Australia. 

1206 OHve OH. 

« 

DIRECTOR OF THE BOTANIC GARDENS, Melbourne. 

1206a Resin obtained from Eucalyptus fissilis (Messmate). 

1207 „ „ „ „ amygdalina (Stringy Gum, Ac.) 

1208 „ „ „ „ leueoxylon (Milkwhite Gum). 

1209 „ „ „ „ viminalis (Box, Weeping Gum, 

Peppei^int). 

1210 „ „ „ „ obliqua (Stringybark). 

1211 „ „ „ Araucaria Cunninghamii (Moreton Bay 

Hoop Pine). 

1213 „ „ „ Syncarpia lauiifolia (Turpentine Tree, New 

South Wales). 

1214 „ „ „ Eucalyptus Stuartiana (Apple-tree Gum). 

1215 „ „ „ „ pulverulenta (Powdery Gum). 

1216 Gum obtained from Panax sambucifolius (Elderberry Ash). 

1217 „ „ „ Grevillea robusta (Silky Oak). 

1218 „ „ „ Hakea gibbosa. 

1219 ,. „ „ Corynocarpuslaevigatus (New Zealand Laurel). 

1220 „ „ „ Acacia pycnantha (Golden Wattle). 

1221 „ „ „ Sterculia diversifolia (Victorian Bottle Tree). 

1222 ,j „ „ Acacia dealbata (Silver Wattle). 

1223 „ „ „ Acacia decurrens (Common Wattle). 

1224 Gum Sandarac obtained from Callitris robusta (Desert Pine). 

1225 „ „ „ „ Callitris rhomboidea (Native Cy- 

press). 

1 226 Gum Sandarac, obtained from Callitris Gunni (Tasmanian Cypress). 



74 CATALOGUE OF THE 

heading the list with foiu* exhibits. Mr. G. S./ Smith represents^ 
Wahgimyah, and Mr. Qeorge Spiiik Taiiuwingee. The Melbourne- 
district is well represented by nine grtyirers, of whom Mr. H. de Castella, 
is the largest exhibitor ; this gentleman has sent six exhibits. Sandhurst 
is represented by eleven growers, of whom Mr. Carl Pohl takes the 
lead with twelve exhibits. 

The nxunber of samples exhibited are divided into about thirty varieties^ 
of wine, the most common being Hermitage, Burgiuidy, Biesling, Ver- 
deilho and Chasselas. The rarer occurring varieties are — Malvoisie, 
Esparto, Fineau, Koussette, Muscatel, Tokay. Aucarot, Ugni blanc and 
Leverdun (Gloria of Australia). 

The great complaint that has hitherto existed against Victorian wine 
was its newness. This arose from the fact that the manufacturers could 
with few exceptions afford to keep a large stock on hand, and were 
obliged to sell to the dealera, who in their turn were averse to seeing the 
capital invested lying idle for any length of time. This will seem now 
in a great measure to have been got rid of, for on looking over the 
returns of the exhibits, it will be found that the Ararat growers exhibit 
mixed white and Hermitage four years old. Burgundy four years old, 
Chasselas and Riesling three-quarter. Muscatel one-quarter, seven years old, 
Riesling, white Nice and mixed grapes, five years old. Amongst the 
Beechworth exhibits will be found Riesling, seven and five years; 
Shiraz, six and five yeara, and Verdeilho four years old; Castlemaine 
Hermitage is five and four years old; Burgundy six years; Riesling, 
Black Cluster, and Roussette four years old. From Echuca we 
have Little Riesling sheiTy and Carbinet and Sauvignon four years old ; 
Hermitage, Grenache, Burgimdy and Carbinet five years old. Amongst 
the exhibits from the Melbourne district are Mataro, Hermitage, Riesling 
and Verdeilho four years old; Gouais five years old, and Hermitage six 
years old; Riesling six years; Chasselas four and six years; large and 
small Riesling seven years old. In the Wahgunyah collection there ai'e 
Shiraz and Malbec and Muscatel six years old; while amongst the 
Sandhurst exhibits are to be found Verdeilho six years old; Hermitage 
five years; Carbinet six and Hermitage six and seven years old; and 
Gouais five years. 

A new feature has been introduced by the Conmiissioners with respect 
to the wine exhibition of 1875. In former years visitors to the Exhi- 
bition saw the bottles containing the wine, read the labels, and had to 
take for granted that the taste of the experts as to quality was correct. 
This year the public will be able to decide for themselves upon the merits 
of the various Colonial wines exhibited. The Commissioners have made 
arrangements with the exhibitors by which some of them have provided a 
certain quantity of each variety of wine exhibited to be sold to the public 
at retail prices. For this purpose a handsome bar has been fitted up iii 
the Rotunda, to be d,evoted exclusively to the sale of Colonial wine. The 
Court near the J^otunda, in which the foimtain is situated, will also 
be provided with small tables placed under the shelter of coveruig 
ferns and evergreens, so that those who desire may sip the juice of the 
Australian grape at their leisure in the open air. If not able to enjoy 
the Hermitage and Tokay imder the clustering parent vine, this is tiie 



INT£RCOH(>QIfIAL EiXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 



75 



next best thing to it. It is to be hoped that the detenniiiation of 
the Commissioners will find favour with all those who take an interest 
in the future vine-culture prospects of Australia. 



ARARAT DISTRICT. 
Grower — J. Mackiehan. Locality — Mount Rouse. 



Name of variety or 
varieties of Oiapee. 



. of Character— 

wSe- Colour. ^'llS^'lS^fe**^* 
vears full'bodied, 

•' ****"• sweet or liqueur. 



Informatiou as to Soil» 
Aspect, Elevation, &c. 



1246 Chasselas, Ries- 4 white light, diy light loam upon iron- 

ling, & Grouais stone gravel, subsoil 

clay 

Grower — Joseph Best. Locality — Great Western. 

1247 Mixed White ... 4 white light sand, gravel and clay 

1248 Hermitage ... 4 i^d full-bodied „ 

Growers — Trouette and Blampied. Locality — Great Western. 

4 red light sand and clay 



1249 Burgimdy 

1 250 Mixed Gi-apes . . . 

1251 Burgundy 

1252 Burgundy 

1253 Malvoisie 

1254 Hermitage 

1255 Chasselas 

1256 Riesling f, Mus- 

cat ^ 

1257 Riesli]^ 

1258 White Nice ... 

1 259 Mixed Gi-apes . . . 

1260 Riesling (little 

Muscat) 



4 
9 



red 
red 



1 red 
1 red 
1 red 



light 

full-bodied 

full-bodied 

light 

full-bodied 



7 white light 

7 white light 

5 white light 

5 white light 

5 white full-bodied 

1 white full-bodied 



BEECHWORTH DISTRICT. 

Growers — F. G. & J. B. Dqcker. Locality — Wangaratta. 

1261 Riesling ... 7 white light, dry .wd loam, level situ- 

ation, well ditiined 

1262 Riesliug ... ,5 white light, dry 

1263 Shiraz 5 red fiijl-bodied 

and dry 

1264 Shiraz ... ...• 6 red full-bodied 

and dry 






Grower — Henry Evans. Locality — Beechwoi-th. 

1265 Verdeilho, Ries- 4 white fidl-bodied chocolate loam, grajoite 

ling and Tokay " and quartz 

1266 Shiraz ... ... 3 red fuU-bodied ' „ 



76 CATALOGUE OF THK 

Grower — ^F. A. Bertbakd. Locality — ^Beeckworth. 

Affe of Character — 

Name of variety or v^tn^V n^i/^n- whether light, Infoniiation as to Soil, 

varietiei of Grapes. veMT" * full-bodied, Aspect, Elevation, &c. 

J *'*™* sweet OT liqueur. 

1267 Malbec... ... 3 red liqueur sandy day, granite^ vol- 

canic, sloping, "W^. 
aspect 

Grower— James Webster. Locality — Beechworth. 

1268 Malbec 3 dark full-bodied rich dark chocolate soil 



CASTLEMAINE DISTRICT. 

Grower — Fabrizzio Crippa. Locality — Hepburn. 

1269 Hermitage ... 4 red light-bodied chocolate soil on a hill- 

side, N.W. aspect 

Grower — Francis Mellon. Locality — Dunolly. 

1270 Mom-vedre or Es- 3 red light-bodied red clay, calcareous 

parte stone, quartz 

1271 Hermitage ... 4 red full-bodied gravel 

1272 Pineau... ... 3 red full-bodied „ 

Grower — ^Ehrenfield Schroeder. Locality — Chinaman's Creek. 

1273 Verdeilho ... 2 white light-bodied black soil and drift, low 

ground, W. aspect 

1274 Mataro §, Her- 2 red light-bodied clay, slate and sand- 

mitage ^ stone reef, E. aspect, 

slope 950 feet above 
sea 

Grower — ^William Botten. Locality — ^Loddon River. 

1275 Burgundy ... 6 red full-bodied sandy loam, N.E. aspect 

1276 Hermitage ... 5 red full-bodied „ 

Grower — ^Thomas Meredith. Locality— -Chewton. 

1277 Grenache ... 3 red full-bodied clay, sandstone and 

slate, N.W. aspect, 
1100 feet above sea 

1278 Hermitage ... 2 red full-bodied „ 

Grower — Otto Jung. Locality — Chinaman's Creek. 

1279 Riesling ... 4 white light-bodied red clay and slate, £. 

aspect, slightly ele- 
vated 

1280 Black Cluster ... 4 red lightrbodied „ 

1281 Roussette ... 4 white full-bodied „ 

1282 Hermitage ... 4 red full-bodied „ 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 



77 



BGHUCA DISTRICT. 
Grower — John Yettlee. Locality — Echuca. 



Name of viriety or 
iwrietieB of OntpeB. 



* m Chancter — 

\^^ Hninn,. Whether, lii^t. Information as to SoQ. 

^me-- Colour. ftiu-bodiai. Aspect, Elevation, &c. 

^ ^*^ sweet or liqueur. 



1283 little Biedii^... 4 

1284 Sherry... ... 4 

1285 Verdeilbo ... 3 

1286 Pedro Ximenes... 2 

1287 Hermitage ... 5 

1288 Hermitage ... 3 

1289 Grenache ... 5 

1290 Grenache ... 2 

1291 LeverdonorGlo- 3 

ria of Australia 

1292 Carbinet Sauvig- 

non 

1293 Burgundy ... 5 

1294 Carbinet Sauvig- 5 

non 



white full-bodied, sandy soil, slightly ele- 
vated 



white full-bodied 

white full-bodied, 

white full-bodied 

red full-bodied 

red full-bodied 

red ftill-bodied 

red full-bodied 

red full-bodied 



>> 



» 



99 



ti 



if 



level, E. aspect 



ft 



7> 



ff 



slightlyelevated 



4 red ftdl-bodied 



red full-bodied 
red full-bodied 



>> 



>> 



» 



» 



» 



» 



level 



>> 



ff 



„ slightlyelevated 



» 



» 



>} 



GEELONG DISTRICT. 

Grower — Jacob Deppeleb. Locality — Gheiinghap. 

1295 Chasselas ... 1 white full-bodied sandy loam,, limestone, 

E. aspect 

1296 Hermitage ... 1 red full-bodied 



ft 



» 



Grower — Jacob Weber. Locality — Leigh Road. 

1297 Chasselas ... 1 white full-bodied sandyloam,N.E. aspect 

1298 Hermitage ... 1 i*ed full-bodied „ „ „ 

Grower — John Ritchie. Locality — Murgheboluc. 

1299 Chasselas ... 1 white full-bodied loam, clay subsoil, E. 

... 1 red full-bodied aspect, elevation, a 

rise of 1 in 5 

-Charles Craike. Locality — Lynnbum. 
... 2 red light black loam, clay, lime- 



1300 


Hermitage 




Grower- 


1301 


Hermitage 


1302 


Riesling 




Grower 


1303 


Mataro... 


1304 


CTiasselas 


1305 


Chasselas 



stone subsoil 



... 2<fe3 white full-bodied 



I) 



» 



» 



-Charles Buchanan. Locality — Ondit. 

2 light red sweet, red volcanic soil, rest- 
full-bodied ing on limestone ; 
... 2 amber sweet, elevation, 450 feet 

full-bodied above sea level ; N. E. 
2 amber lights dry aspect 



78 CATALOOUE OP THfe 

GOXTLBfURl^ tol^TRICT. 
Qrowet* — FR^DsaibK Eou. Locality-^Tabilk. 

. • Character — 

Name of vartety or i^f rvwi«„, whether light. InformMion as to Soil, 

varieties of Qmpes. !;iS?r ^*°^* fall-bodied. Aspect^ Elevation, &c. 

yeani. weet or Mqueur. 

1306 Hermitage ... 2 i*ed full-bodied.. red loam and sahd, level 

Grower — E. BaENSiKa Locality— Goulbum Valley. 

1307 Riesling ... 1 red light red clay and sand 
1303 Burgundy, Gloria 1 red light „ 

and Hermitage 

Growers — Bear & Foed. Locality— Tabilk Vineyard, near Seyxnoui*. 
1309 Riesling, Chas- 3 white light . chocolate loam;, border- 





selas, Pineau 
Blanc &Grouais 






4 


ingonela 


1310 


Burgundy or 
Cluster 


3 


i'^ 


li«lrt 


j> 


1311 


Verdeilho 


8 


wMte 


full-bodied . . 
and sweet 


79 


1312 


RiesKng 


3 


white 


full-bodied 


y> 


1313 
1314 


Riesling 
Ugni Blanc 


3 
3 


white 
white 


full-bodied 
full-bodied 


7t 


1315 


Hermitage, Mal- 
bec, Grenache, 
and Mataix) 


3 


red 


full-bodied 


if 


1316 


Hermitage 


3 


red 


full-bodied 


» 



Exhibitor — Charles Brache. Locality — GoulbmTL 

1317 Riesling ... 3 white diy medium 

body 

MELBOURNE DISTRICT. 
Grower — Franz Schmitt. Locality — Berwick. 

1318 Riesling ... 3 white full-bodied black loam, black clay 

subsoil, N. W. aspect 

1319 Riesling ... 1 white full-bodied „ „ 

Grower — Charles Francis. Locality — Sunbuiy. 

1320 Grouais... ... 5 white light gi-eat variety of soils, 

W. aspect 

1321 Mataro 4 red light slope, 700 to 800 feet 

level above sea 

1322 Hermitage ... 4 red full-bodied „ 

Grower — James Stewart Johnson. Locality — ^Sunbmy. 

1323 Riesling (Shep- 4 white light chocolate, clay subsoil, 

herd's and Ger- gentle slope, W. as- 

nian) pect 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 79 

Attn at Chankofter— 

Name of variety or rSJi^ n«i/v«» whetlier light, Infonnation as to Soil, 

varieties of Grapes. r^~ ^*<*^- fuU-bodied. Aspect, Elevation, Ac. 

years. sweet or liqueur. 

1324 Eiesling (Shep- 3 white light chocolate, claj subsoil, 

herd's and Ger- gentle slopo, W. as- 

man) peet. 

1325 Vei-deilho ... 4 white full-bodied 

1326 Hermitage ... .6 i-ed full-bodied 






99 99 



99 99 



99 99 



99 99 



99 99 



Grower — Charles Maplestone, Locality — ^Ivanhoe. 

1327 Large and small 3 straw light sandy loam, S.W. as- 

Riesling pect 

1328 Large and small 5 straw light 

Riesling 

1329 Large and small '*l sti*aw light 

Hiesling 

1330 Hermitage and 3 i*uby light 

small pi'oix)r- 
tion of Car- 
binet 

1331 Hermitage and 5 ruby light ' 

small propor- 
tion of Car- » 
binet 

1332 Hermitage and 2 ruby light 

small propor- 
tion of Car- 
binet 

Locality — Riddell's Ci'feek. 

1333 Chasselas princi- 2 straw light sandy loam, some black 

pally, some soil 

Grouais 

1334 Carbinet Sauvig- 2 ruby light „ „ 

non 

Orower — St. Hubert's Vineyard Co. (Limited). Locality — Yering. 

1335 Riesling ... 6 white light rich loam, subsoil clay 

and gravel 

1336 Chasselas ... 6 white light 

1337 Chasselas ... 4 white light 

1338 White Hermitage 2 white light 

1339 Hermitage ... 2 red light 

1340 Sauvignon ... 2 red light 

Exhibitor — Charles Brache. Locality — Sunbmy. 

1341 Shepherd's Ries- 4 white light h diy, 

ling Hock cha- 

racter 



99 
>9 
99 
99 
99 



80 CATALOGUE OF THE 

Grower — E. G. Skowdbn. Looality — ^Boroondara. 

» _^ Character — 

Name <rf variety or ^S!i^ n^i™,, whether liffht, Informati<»i as to Sofl, 

varieties of Grapes. viT™"" i^iour. fuu.bodied. Aspect, ElevatJon, &c 

J **"• sweet or liqueur. 

1342 Riesling ^large)... 4 white medium sandy loam 

1343 Riesling (large)... 4 white medium „ 

1344 Mataro ... 4 red light „ 

Grower — John Davies. Locality — Moonee Ponds. 

1345 Various sorts of 4 white medium gravelly and volcanic. 

White Grapes clay subsoil, N. & E. 

aspect, 100ft. above 
sea level 



1346 Various sorts of 3 white medium 

White Grapes 

1347 Mixture of Her- 4 red medium 

mitages 

1348 MixtureofShiraz 4 red medium 



» 



» 



if 



Grower — Charles Daniel. Localiiry — ^Bulla. 

1349 Chasselas and 1 white light sandy loam, ironstone, 

Gouais and rotten granite. 

1350 Pineau Noir,' Ca- 1 red full-bodied „ 

rignan and Ma- 
taro 

MITRRAY DISTRICT. 

Grower — George S. Smith. Locality — ^Wahgunyah. 

1351 Shiraz and Mai- 6 red light light loam, E. aspect, 

bee slightly elevated 

1352 Muscatel ... 6 red full-bodied, „ 

and sweet 

Grower — George Spink. Locality — Tarrawingee. 

1353 Riesling ... 3 white full-bodied marly 

1354 Shiraz ... ... 3 red full-bodied „ 

SANDHURST DISTRICT. 

Grower — ^Adolph Fuchs. Locality — Strathfieldsaye. 

1355 VerdeUho ... 2 white full-bodied clay, intermixed with 

sandy soil 

1356 Carbinet ...2 red full-bodied „ 

1357 Hermitage ... 2 red full-bp*died „ 

Grower — Carl Pohl. Locality — Strathfieldsaye. 

1358 Riesling ... 2 white light sand, clay subsoil, N.E. 

aspect 

1359 Carbinet ... 1 red light „ 




INTERCOLOXIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 



81 



Name of variety or 
varieties of Orapes. 

1360 Verdeilho 



A^ of 

Wine— Colour. 

years. 



1361 
1362 
1363 
1364 
1365 
1366 
1367 

1368 
1369 



1370 



1373 
1374 
1375 



1376 
1377 



1378 
1379 
1380 
1381 



Character— 

whether Mg^t, 

full-bodied. 

sweet or liqueur. 



Information as to Soil, 
Aspect, Elevation, &c. 



... 2 

Verdeilho . . 1 

Verdeilho ... 6 

Hermitage ... 5 

Hermitage ... 4 

Hermitage ... 2 

Hermitage ... 1 

Carbinet & Her- 6 

mitage 

Hermitage ... 6 

Carbinet & Her- 7 

mitage. 



white full-bodied sand, claj subsoil, N.E. 

aspect 
white full-bodied 
white full-bodied 



w 



red 
red 
red 
red 
red 

red 
red 



full-bodied 
full-bodied 
full-bodied 
full-bodied 
full-bodied 

full-bodied 
full-bodied 



>9 



» 



» 



a 



)f 



» 



99 



f$ 



Grower — Jean Merle. 
Gramais ... 2 red 



1371 Gamais 



5 red 



Locality — Daylesford. 

light chocolate soil, steep 

rising ground. K 
aspect 

light „ 



Grower — W. Greipfenhaoen. Locality — Strathfieldsaye. 



1372 Kiesling 



Verdeilho 
Burgimdy 
Hei-mitage 



4 white light 



3 white full-bodied 

2 red full-bodied 

3 red full-bodied 



sandy loam, red clay 
subsoil, E. aspect, 
level 



» 



>> 



gentle slope 



w 



Grower — ^H. N. FiCK. 

Mataro... ... 3 red 

Hermitage ... 3 red full-bodied 



Locality — Campaspe. 

light loamy soil, elevated 



» 



Grower — ^William Jones. 

Golden Chasselas 1 white 

Kiesling .#. 1 white 

Hermitage ... 1 red 

Mataro... ... 1 red 

Grower — ^Albert Bruhn. 



Locality — Sheepwash. 

light sweet yellow clay 
light sweet 
full-bodied 
full-bodied 



j> 



99 



» 



1382 Riesling 



1383 


Chasselas 


2 


white 


1384 


Mataro... 


1 


red 


1385 


Verdeilho 


3 


white 


1386 


Verdeilho 


1 


white 


1387 


Carbinet and 
Hermitage 


2 


red 



Locality — Strathfieldsaye. 

1 white light sandy soil, rich red clay 

• subsoil, N.W. aspect 

%lit „ 

light „ gentle slope 

full-bodied 
full-bodied 
full-bodied 



99 



»> 



82 



CATALOGUE OF THE 



Name of variety or 
varieties of Grapes. 

1388 Hermitage 



Aged 

Wine — Colour. 

years. 

1 red 



1389 Hermitage ... 3 red 

« 

Grower — F. K. Shaw. 

1390 Hermitage ... 4 red 

Grower — Carl A. Heine. 

1391 Hermitage ... 5 red 

Grower — ^Frederick Grosse. 

1392 Carbinet ... 2 red 



Character— - 
whether light, Information as to Soil, 

foIl-bodiM, Aspect, Elevation, &c. 

sweet or liqueur. 

full-bodied sandy soil, rich red clay 

subsoil, N.W. aspect 
full-bodied „ 

Locality — Goomong. 

full-bodied chocolate soil, N.W. 

aspect 

Locality — Strathfieldsaye. 
full-bodied red clay, Eastern aspect 

Locality — Strathfieldsaye. 

light loam clay subsoil, N.E. 

aspect 



1393 


Verdeilho 


... 2 white 


full-bodied „ 


1394 


Hennitage 


... 2 red 


full-bodied „ 




Grower — ^August Fischer. 


Locality — Strathfieldsaye. 


1395 


Riealing 


... 1 white 


light red clay 


1396 


Verdeilho 


... 2 white 


full-bodied „ 


1397 


Verdeilho 


... 1 white 


full-bodied „ 


1398 


Hermitage 


... 2 red 


full-bodied „ 


1399 


HermitAge 


... 1 red 


full-bodied „ 


1400 


Carbinet 


... 1 red 


fidl-bodied „ 



NEW SOUTH WALES. 

At the close of the year 1873, the number of acres in New South 
Wales devoted to the cultivation of the vine was 3168. The quantity 
of wine produced was 675,985 gallons, while the quantity of brandy 
manufactured amounted to 1916 J gallons. The acreage covered by 
vines, the produce of which was not used for wine-making purposes, 
amounted to 550^ acres, whUe the quantity of grapes disposed of for 
consumption and purposes other than wine manufacture amounted to 
617^ tons. 

Grower — Montague Parnell. Locality — ^West Maitland, N.S.W. 

1401 Hermitage ... 1 red medium alluvial, limestone, 

N.W. aspect 
amber full-bodied 
white fine old wine 
white full-bodied 



1402 
1403 
1404 



Madeira 
Eiesling 
Hiesling 



2 
9 
1 



>j 



>> 



Grower — George Wyndham. Locality — Branxton, Hunter River, 

N.S.W. 
1405 Pineau... ... 2 white full-bodied deep sandy loam, eleva- 
tion 200 feet above 
river-bed 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 83 

4 M Character— 

N«me of variety or * «S?^ n^i/1,1,. whether light. Information as to Soil, 
varieUee of Grapes. vea™ fuU-bodied, Aspect, Elevation, &c. 

yvan, sweet or liqtieur. 

1406 Pineau... ... 2 white full-bodied deep sandy loam, eleva- 

tion 200 feet above 
river-bed 

1407 Hermitage and 3 red full-bodied „ 

Malbec 

1408 Burgundy ... 2 red full-bodied „ 

Grower — Carl J. P. Brbcht. LooeJity — Rosemount, Denman, N.S.W. 

1409 Shepherd's Bies- 3 white full-bodied sand and loam mixed 

ling 

1410 Bed Hermitage 5 red full-bodied ,, 

1411 Hermitage and 2 red full-bodied ,, 

Burgundy 

Grower — J. L. Serisier. Locality — Eumalga, Dubbo, N.S.W. 

1412 Shiraz ... ... 1 white light volcanic, black and 

chocolate soil, with 
basaltic stone, E. as- 
pect, slope 1 in 50 



1413 


Biasling 


... 


1 


white 


light 


99 


Grower — Wadham Wyndham. Locality — Bukkulla, InvereJl, JN.8.W. 


1414 


Malbec 


... 


3 


red 


medium 


red loam and ironstone 


1415 


Hermitage 


... 


3 


red 


full-bodied 


}9 


Grower — ^Alex. 


MUNRO. 


Locality — Bebeah 


, Singleton, N.S.W. 


1416 


Shiraz ... 


... 


3 


white 


light 


heavy black soil, 
slightly elevated 


1417 


Pineau . . . 


... 


2 


white 


light • 


light red sand „ 


1418 


Shiraz ... 


... 


1 


white 


light 


heavy black soil „ 


1419 


Pineau . . . 


... 


1 


yellow 


' medium 


light sandy „ 


1420 


Pineau and Pedro 


3 


yellow 


' medium 


» 99 




Ximenes 




N 








1421 


Verdot... 


. . • 


1 


red 


light 


rich dark loam „ 


1422 


Hermitage 


... 


1 


red 


Hght 


heavy black soil „ 


1423 


Lambrasquat 


... 


1 


red 


full-bodied 


light sandy soil „ 


Grower — Carhichael Bros. Locality — Seaham, Williams River, 










N.S.W. 




1424 


Biesling 


• > * 


5 


white 


Hght 


alluvial, clay subsoil, 


• 












N.E. aspect 


1425 


Biesling 


... 


3 


white 


light 


" 


1426 


Madeira 


... 


6 


white 


full-bodied 


" 


1427 


Biesling 


« * * 


6 


white 



fuU-bodied 
2 


i 
99 



84 



CATALOGUE OF THE 



Growei's — E. Greer asd Co. Locality — Albury, N.S.W. 



Name of variety or 
varietiea of Grapes. 



Affeof 

mne— Ck>lour. 

years. 



1428 
1429 
1430 
1431 
1432 
1433 
1434 
1435 
1436 
1437 
1438 
1439 



Shiraz ... 
Aucarot 
Shiraz ... 
Shiraz (fruity) 
Malbec 

White Muscat 
Carbinet 
Verdeilho 
Burgundy 
Shiraz ... 
VerdeUho 
Carbinet 
Malbec 



and 



4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2 



red 

white 

red ' 

red 

red 

white 

red 

white 

red 

red 

white 

red 



Character— 
whether light, 

full-bodi^, 
sweet or liqueur. 

full-bodied 
full-bodied 
full-bodied 
full-bodied 
full-bodied 
full-bodied 
full-bodied 
full-bodied 
full-bodied 
full-bodied 
full-bodied 
full-bodied 



Information as to Soil, 
Aspect, Elevation, iui. 



loamy 



J) 

ft 

if 
if 
if 
if 

fy 



Grower — James T. Fallon. Locality — ^Albury, N.S.W. 



1440 Hermitage 



1441 


Malbec . . . 


... 6 


1442 


Riesling 


... 6 


1443 


Aucarot 


... 6 


1444 


Aucarot 


... 3 


1445 


Tokay ... 


... 7 


i446 


Shiraz ... 


... 7 


1447 


Tokay ... 


... 11 



red full rich chocolate soil of vol- 

wine canic character 

red full rich wine 

white rich wine 

white rich wine 

white full wine 

white full-bodied 

red light 



>> 



j> 



>> 



>> 



j> 



11 white full-bodied 



J) 



>> 



SOUTH AUSTRALIA. 

The acreage of land occupied by vines in South Australia in the year 
1874 was 5217 acres. The number of vines bearing in 1874 was 
5,106,874, whUe those not bearing may be set down at 230,391. This 
shows a decrease as compared with the year 1872-73 of 81,178 vines. 
During the year 1871-2 the quantity of wine made was 733,478 gals., 
and the quantity of grapes sold and disposed of for other purposes than 
the manufacture of wine amounted to 44,982 cwt. The quantity of 
wine made from the vintage of 1874-5 was 648,186 gals. 



Grower — Joseph Gilbert. Locality- 
1448 Riesling ... 7 white light 



1449 Riesling ... 6 

1450 Riesling ... 11 

1451 Verdeilho ... 11 

1452 Carbinet and Shi- 7 

raz 

1453 Carbinet ... 6 



white light 

white light 

white light 

red light 

red light 



-Pewsey Vale, S.A. 

sandy & gravelly, 1650 
feet above sea level 

ft 
>f 
If 
If 



>f 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. ^^ 

Grower — ^Wm. B. Eounseville. Locality — Conyton Park, S.A. 

A of Character- 
Nome of variety or SS«a n«i«,„. whether light, Information as to Soil, 
varieties of Grapes. ^21^" * full-bodied, Aspect, Elevation, Ac. 

* ^^' sweet or liqueur. 

1454 Eiesling ... 3 white light sandy loam, W. aspect, 

hilly, 1700 ft. abov« 
sea level 

1455 Shii'az and Car- 3 red light „ 

binet 

1456 Riesling ... 3 white dry and light „ 

Grower — J. W. Richman. Locality — ^Water\'ale, S.A. 

1457 Shiraz ... ... 5 red full-bodied limestone, hilly 

1458 Carbinet 

1459 Grenache 

1460 Riesling 

1461 White Siianish 

1462 Grenache 



5 i-ed full-bodied „ 

4 white full-bodied „ 

4 white full-ljodied „ 
o white light „ 

5 white light „ 



Grower — ^Thomas Hardy. Localitr — Baiikijide VinevaixU, 8. A. 

1463 Pedro Ximenes 4 white full-lxKii*^ 

and others 

1464 Shiraz and others % rwl full-bodied 

1465 Black Portugal . . 5 re*l liqueur aliu^-ium on cIav and 

limestn. deioom[>^/5^:d 

1466 Muscat k. Gamo 6 white liqueur „ 

Blanco 

Grower — J. H. Kaixes. Jyx:itihr — ^AdeLii'i^, S-A, 

1467 SLir&z ... ... 6 r*^ f-rll-Vrii*:*! saii.dvar.dclATVyiLle'/el 

Grr.-sTrr — J. B. HoiiL -:*:•£, Lo^aliir — MiA^.t^'^'ju H.X. 

146S Verie-ilL'j ... -^ irl.f'^e f".II-V>ii*^i loai:.T 

Whi* Gcn^ii* ... -> Triple f.-Vyii-e^l ^ 

1470 >:ln^ ... 4 r*»i f"."-V>;I^i ^ 

1471 ^li2^^ ... -> rv^-i f-.l^Vxi^ ^ cc '1^ ymh^ 

1472 H-eJTlLf-^^'tr .- 2 ?'Hl ^TTiH*^ ^ 

1473 y^>.'ui^j ... % 7^i iiy-jrAjr^i ^ 

1477 G!r»5iA'-{ii* 3Ltr.«ur-:. 7 2*ji fiJl.*-Vx!i*j£ -. 



!.._ . _ ^^ 



86 



CATAtOOUS OF THE 



Grower. — Edmund W. Weight. Locality — ^Home Park, Magill, S.-Al. 

Age of 

wine— Colour. 



Name of variety or 
varieties of Grapes. 

1479 Muscatel 



Character— 
whethor light, 
v«». full-bodiea. 

''^'* sweet or liqueur. 



Information as to Soil, 
Aspect, Elevation, ^kc. 



2 white sweet 



1480 Muscatel 



4 white sweet 



ferruginous gravel 

overlying rotten 

limestone on red 
clay 



79 



Grower — Mrs. Baker. Locality — Monallo^ S.A. 



1481 Mixed White 



1482 
1483 
1484 
1485 
1486 



Mixed White 
Mixed Bed 
Mixed White 
Mixed Red 
Mixed Red 



2 white full-bodied gravelly, Mount Lofty 

Range 

5 white full-bodied 

4 red full-bodied 

4 white light 

4 red full-bodied 

5 red full-bodied 



» 

99 

99 
99 



1487 

1488 
1489 
1490 
1491 

1492 
1493 



Grower — Joseph Gillard. Locality — ^Norwood, S.A. 

Frontignac and 5 red sweet 
Mataro 

... 4 white sweet 

...6<&7red sweet 

... 4 red sweet 



Madeira 

Shiraz ... 

Frontignac 

Frontignac and 5 red sweet, full- 

Mataro bodied 

Mataro & Shiraz 6<&7 red full-bodied 
Mixed White 6<fe2 white full-bodied 



loamy 



99 
99 



Grower — Patrick Auld. Locality — ^Auldana Vineyard, S. A. 

2 



1 494 Carbinet and Ma- 
taro 



1495 Mataro and Shi- 

raz 

1496 Verdeilho 

1497 Verdeilho and 

Grvstals 

1498 Verdeilho and 

Crystols 

1499 Frontignac 



ruby full-bodied ironstone, limestone, 

and decayed slate, 
N. aspect, elevation 
600ft. above sea level 



2 ruby full-bodied 

1 white full-bodied 

2 white full-bodied 

2 amber full-bodied 

2 ruby sweet 



99 

9r 

99 
99 



Grower — George White. Locality — ^Rosefield Vineyard, S.A. 



1500 Pedro Ximenes 

1501 Dorodilla 



• • . 



white light 
white light 



ISTEBCOLOKIAL EXHIBITION. 1S75. 

Grower — G. L. Barnard. Locftlily — WnlkpnilK 8.A. 

llKhi. 
>11«<I, 






1502 Chasselas&ad 2 white light 

Verdeilho 

1503 Mftlbec and For- 3 red full-bwlit'd loiimy 

tugal 

Grower — Bichuons Bakeb. Locitlity — ^A<l(iliiitli>. 

1504 Bed Madeira ... 3&3 red Rwent uliounUiUi 
1805 Shiras! and For- 8&9 red full-ljodiod „ 

tugal 

Grower — G, F, Ind. Locitlity — Piiiwliim, H.A. 

1506 Grenache, Ver- 3 red full-bodhd wmdy loam, N.K, iwj.ri'H 

deilho li Qouais 

1507 Shirasi ifc Mataro 3 red fuU-Wlied „ 

Grower— CHABLE8 BuBMEY YouKG, Locality — Adnlauht, H.A. 

1508 Shiraz & Mataro 5 red full-lMdkd itamly liiam, rnarly unli- 

H<,i!, K. a#tu--t, Wi 
nlyjve MSI inxfA 

1509 Shiraz i Slataro 4 kA f.iJI-Wlwl „ 

Grower— K, D. Boss. ljx>dky—Wgf^^yiu\/'., H.\. 

1510 Shiraz. Carliioei, 8 mijj li^i ]tMn.y, «i'Ji 'wmmjh^, 

and )Ialbec l-V// ft. n**/** l«r»>rJ 

1511 Shiraz. Cari«*t 4 r-V ;;;tf,-. 

Mai--* 

1512 SLiiw. C*?^,i:>'L « r-..v» .:;^.'. „ 

M.&r>>% 

1513 Ri w^'7- r^T-W^ ( KiLve? f.:.Vvi>;^ « 

1514 Siirsz. 'I^~.c2i«. 5 r».*7 i 

1515 EJw.— f T*.— U'''- 5 iiu.,w . 




88 CATALOGUE OP THE 



DEPARTMENT 6. 
BEER AND SPIRITS. 



EXPERTS. 



C. R. Blackett, Esq. 
Johnson Hicks, Esq., Chair- 
man. 



James Hay, Esq. 

G eo. Manley Hopwood, Esq. 

Edmund James, Esq. 



Wm. Johnson, Esq. 

M. Lang, Esq. 

G. D. M*Cormick, Esq. 



Brewing has become of late years a most valuable and impoi-tant 
industry, and John Barleycorn holds a very high place in manufactuiing 
society. The Colony owns 107 breweries and eighteen malt-houses. 
Nearly all the breweries employ steam machinery of more or less power. 
The malt is almost entirely made of Australian grain, and a veiy large 
proportion of the hops used, is grown in Tasmania and Gippsland. 
Sugar is used to a considerable extent in brewing the lower class 
ales. During the year ending March 31st, 1875, 13,653,531 gallons 
of ale and porter have been brewed in the colony, and in the pre- 
paration 925 men and lads have been employed. To give an idea 
of the value of this industry, we may state that in Victoiia there are 
two breweries which turn out nearly £150,000 worth of ale per a-nmiTp 
between them j two others doing business to the extent of i£30,000 each, 
and many who estimate their annual produce as worth from between 
£1000 to £10,000 a-year. There are oidy four distilleries in the colony, 
which distil about £55,000 worth of neat spirit per annum. The rate of 
wages in the breweries avei-ages £2 5s. per man weekly, and in the 
distilleries a few shillings more, according to cii-cumstances. 

CORDIALS AND SEATED WATERS. 

The heat of an Australian summer is provocative of a thii-st that has 
been eagerly utilised by a goodly number of those quick-witted people 
who never hear the word demand without seeking at once to supply. 
That the supply of harmless diinks is quite suflSLcient to satisfy thu-sty 
Victorians will be best proved by the an-ay of figures herein quoted. 

In Victoria there are 123 factories and smaller places of business 
devoted entirely to the manufactiu-e of sodawater, lemonade, gingerbeer, 
raspberry-vinegar, and other di inks of a like nature. Twenty-eight of 
the factories use steam-power; eight have machinery worked by horses, 
and the remainder only employ manual labour. In this branch of ti-ade 
533 men, 35 women, and a large number of childi-en of both sexes find 
employment. 

The rate of wages throughout the ti-ade averages £2 per week per 
man; but the earnings of women and young persons have no fixed scale. 
The more impoiiant of the aerated- water factories are fitted up with 
the newest and most perfect machineiy, and turn out an ai*ticle equal to 
an3rthing that can be imported. The value of the unfermented drinks 
manufactured during any given year cannot, for many reasons, be 
estimated; but it may be stated that one of our lai'gest sodawater 



ISTEBCOliOinAL EXHIBITIOKy 1^75. 89 

factories tams out each year prodnoe to ibe amount of £10,000, and 
that the wholesale value of the mannfactnres produced hj the remainder 
can be estimated, with very few exceptions, at £1000 for each establish- 
ment. 



Gboup 16. 

ATTKEN, THOMAS, Victoria-parade, Melbourne. 

1516 Four-pound Ale. 

1517 Five-poond Ale. 

1518 Bottled Ale. 

1519 Spirits of Wine. 

1520 Whisky. 

ATTKEN, T. & A., Victoria Distilleiy. 

1521 Whisky. 

1522 Spirits of Wine. 

1523 Four-pound Ale. 

1524 Five-pound Ala 

1525 Bottled Ale. 

1526 Bottled Stout. 

BARRELL, THOMAS, Bendigo Brewery, Sandhui^t. 

1527 AleXXXX. 

1528 Ale XXX. 

BARRETT & CO., Sydney, New South Wales. 

1529 Crated Waters. 

1530 Cordials. 

1531 Patent Stopper for Bottles. 

BICKFORD, A. M., & SONS, 19 Hindley-sti-eet, Adelaide, South 

Australia. 

1532 Lime Juice Coi'dial. 

1533 Stomach Bitters. 

1534 Doctor Bittei-s. 

1535 Quinine Wine. 

BILLSON, G., & SON, Beechworth. 

1536 Ale. 

1537 .^Erated Water. 

BOYD & HEAD, Victoria-sti-eet, Collingwood. 

1538 Pale Bitter Ale — English malt, Tasmanian hops. 

1539 Pale Bitter Ale — English and Colonial malt, Tasmanian hops. 



90 CATALOQUB OF THE 

BROWNE, H. J., Australian and Melbourne Distillery, Melbourne. 

1640 Geneva. • 

1641 Spirits of Wine. 

BRUCE, W., Sandhurst 

1642 Bottled Ale. 
1543 Bottled Stout. 

COOPER, ALFRED, Park-street, Brighton. 

1546 Cordials. 

1546 -Crated Waters. 

, COYLE, PATRICK, Royal Mint Brewery, Lonsdale-street, Melbourne. 

1547 Ale. 

DAVIS, ¥. C, Fulham, Adelaide, South Australia. 

1548 Cordials. 

1549 Bitters. 

DIXON, P. G., Mineral Water Works, Rosslyn-street, West 

Melbourne. 

1550 Cordials. " 

1551 British Wines. 

1552 -Crated Mineral Waters. 

DYASON, JOSHUA, Preston. 
1653 Exo (an Efiervescent Tonic). 

FALLON, JAMES T., 114 Collins-street West, Melbourne. 

1554 Murray Valley Brandy, "Aucarot," dai'k, proof spirit, distilled 

on 1st May, 1875. 

1555 Albury Brandy, "Aucarot," pale, proof spirit, distilled on the Isf 

May, 1875. 

FINDLAY, WILLIAM, Southern Brewery, Richmond. 

1556 Bottled Ale. 

1557 Ale. 

FITZGERALD, N., Castlemaine. 

1558 Castlemaine Ale. 

1559 Castlemaine Brewery Ale. 
1660 Bottled Ale. 

1561 Porter. 

FORBES, ELAM & CO., Star Brewery, Smith-street, Colling «rood. 

1562 XXX Colonial Ale, brewed at Star Brewery, Collingwood. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 91 

FCTLLER, ALFRED, Kew. 

1563 Bottled Ala 

1564 Bottled Stout 

GORDON & CO., Little' Bourkenstreet West, Melbourne. 

1565 Cordials. 

GORDON, JAMES, Osboume, MomingtoiL 

1566 Bottled Ala 

1567 Bottled Stout 

HATTERSLEY, J., Yackandandah. 

1568 Sodawater. 

HENNELLY, J., 140 Latrobe-street West, Melbomna 

1569 Ala 

HEPBURN MINERAL WATER CO., 97 Flinders-lane West, 

Melbouma 

1570 Hepburn Mineral Water. 

LATHAM, EDWARD, Carlton Breweiy, Leicester-street, Cailton. 

1571 Porter. 

1572 XXX Ale. 

LYON, GEORGE, Spring Ci-eek, Beechworth. 

1673 Bottled Porter. 

1574 Bottled Ala 

1575 Lemon Syrup. 

1576 Orange Bitters. 

1577 Quinine Still Champagne. 

1578 Tonic Bitters. 

1579 Ginger Wina 

1580 Raspberry Vinegar.' 

1581 Sodawater. 

1582 Tonic Water. 

1583 Lemonade. 

1584 Sauce, • 

MARSHALL, J., Sydney, New South Wales. 

1585 Bottled Porter. 

MARTIN, P. J., Little FlindersHstreet East, Melbouma 

1586 Ale brewed from Victorian malt and Tasmanian hops. 

1587 Porter do. do. do. 

1588 Bottled Ale do. do. do. 

1589 Bottled Porter do. do. do. 

MEDHURST & CO., Brisbane, Queensland. 

1590 Cordials. 



92 CATALOGUE OF THE 

MOODY, JOHN, Moonta, South Australia. 

1591 Bottled Porter. 

MYRING, JOSEPH, Campbell's Creek, Castlemaine. 

1592 Ale. 

POHL, CARL, Strathfieldsaye, Sandhurst. 

1594 CheiTy Wine, 1872. 

PREVOT, E. J., Madeline-street, Carlton. 

1595 Cordials. 

1596 Crated Waters. 

ROWLANDS & LEWIS, Ballarat and Melbourne. 

1597 Soda Water. 

1598 Seltzer Water. 

1599 Tonic Water. 

1600 Ginger Ale. 

1601 Potass Water. 

1602 Cordials. 

1603 Lythia Water. 

SIMMS & CHAPMAN, Adelaide, South Australia. 

1604 Ale. 

1605 Porter. 

STEWARD, JAMES, Eaglehawk, Sandhui-st. 

1606 Ale, brewed from wheat malt. 

1607 Ale, bi-ewed from English malt. 

STRUTTON, ROBERT, Adelaide, South Australia, 

1608 Ale. 

1609 Poiiier. 

TAEGTOW, F., Osbome-sti^et, Williams&wn. 

1610 Bottled Ale, brewed Februaiy, 1875, from English malt and 

Bavarian hops (no sugar). 

1611 Bottled Porter, brewed July, 1875, from Colonial malt and Bava- 

rian hops (no sugar). 

TERRY, ALBERT, West End Breweiy, Spencer-stieet 

1612 Ale XXX. 

1613 AleXXXX. 

TOOHEY & CO., Sydney, New South Wales. 

1614 Stout 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 93 

TREACEY, JOHN, & CO., West End Brewery, Geeloug. 

1615 Bottled Ale. 

1616 Bottled Stout. 

WARRENHEIP DISTILLERY (Unlimited); Office Sturt-street, 

Ballarat; Henry Brand, Secretary. 

1617 Geneva. 

1618 Spirits Wine. 

1619 WMsky. 

WOOD & SON, Yorkshire Brewery, CoUingwood. 

1620 AleXXXX. 

1621 Ale XXX. 

1622 Ale XX. 

YARRA BEND LUNATIC ASYLUM; Surgeon Inspector, E. Paley. 

1623 Beer. 

1624 Beer, quart bottles, brewed at the Asylum, from malt and hops, 

without any saccharine ingredient. 



DEPARTMENT 6. 

FIBROUS OR HAIRY SUBSTANCES OF VEGE- 
TABLE OR ANIMAL ORIGIN. 

EXPERTS. 



C. F. Creswell, Esq. 



Captain Robert Fullarton. Dr. T. S. Ralph. 



M. L. King, Esq., Chaiiman. 



SILK. 



This branch of ftidustry, though as yet in its infancy in the colony, is 
one of great importance, and by no means to be undervalued or over- 
looked. 

It seems difficult to imbue persons with new ideas, but it would be a 
pity indeed were the pioneers in this rich industry to toil on singly and 
laboriously through years of difficiilties, whereas a little public energy 
and exertion might speedily crown the effort with success, and add its 
contribution to swell the public revenue. 

"Speculation" is a misapplied term for an industry known throughout 
the world as one most lucrative. Where the mulberry tree will grow, 
the silkworm will flourish. Labour is quoted as the great drawback to 
the production of the mulberry, but is the cultivation of this tree more 
difficidt than that of the olive, the vine, or the orange? Where the 



94 



CATALOGUE OF THE 



will is good, the difficulties will vanish one bj one, and there will \yG 
added another to the valuable industries of the Colony of Victoria. 

The statistics for the year 1870 will give a good idea of the importance 
of sericulture : — 



Exports by France . . . 

Italy ... 

Other European countries 

China ... 

India ... 

X ersia ... ... ... 

Other Asiatic states . . . 
.Ajnca ... ... ... 

The Pacific Islands ... 
America 

Total 



£4,334,000 

11,260,000 

984,000 

17,000,000 

4,809,000 

920,000 

2,192,000 

44,000 

24,000 

20,000 

£44,787,000 



It has been urged that were Australia to add, on an extensive scale, 
her contribution to the silk market, that it would become overstocked, 
and that prices would fall to the minimum. This, however, is a mistake. 
As the stocks have become larger, the value of raw silk has not 
diminished. The demand has increased with the supply, and prices 
have remained steady. 

California, where traders are so tenacious of early profits, and where 
the price of labour is similar to that of Victoria, has understood the full 
value of silk culture ; there have already been planted in California within 
three or four years half as many trees as there are in France. It miust 
be remembered that in sericulture labour is only required at certain 
periods of the year, viz., those when other demands for labour are dull. 
The success of California lies in a great measure in the hearty spirit of 
co-operation that exists in relation to sericulture. Miilberry trees were 
imported, and the means of commencing operations were granted gratis 
to those who were desirous of giving sericulture a test. The experiment 
has proved highly successful. The Califomian^ sericulturists possess 
already 600,000 mulberry trees, and have received large contracts for 
their silk grain. In 1871 the Government offered bounties of £50 for 
each 500 mulberry trees of the age of two years, and it is calculated 
that in three or four years California will produce ffom one to two 
millions poimds of silk. 

The first' and great means of success is public interest and support, so 
that an impetus be given to the industry at the outset. Eobinet, one of the 
chief of French sericulturists, declares that in a new country the sericole 
industry cannot "be expected to take deep root unless it is initiated by a 
large model establishment which is a nursery, not only of plants, but of 
worms of the right sort, and at the same time a training school for 
reelers and breeders." This opinion is corroborated by facts; for if we 
follow the history of sericulture we shall find that in every country 
where it is flourishing this industry invariably originated in a model 
establishment formed and supported by public money. In our days 
France has establishments of this sort; she has founded one in her 



dustiy, ami soipiadb&tbesMiieid br twv> <Muim>£it )vrv^^^>i$:$vV(^ >0( W^v iW W>^^^^ 
aie admimted aii&d tninted fi^r sericuhure'^ 

Will oar Oo^coiT, whidi in nunr 'w^vs i:ii $id wvwr^uo w^hJ «^H)x^^u>i^\gv 
Tepfl the nmna^iHis and dbulr itKareasiu^ MU>i«i|>l& K> )>)^w (itu« U^xlu^fJ^'V 
on a maiketaUe footing I 

The sericaltmal histoir of Vietoria is; vtMT Ivritvt Th<^ jvuMx^^V W^^* 
Mr& Ttmbrell, a aealons* indefatigable \r\Muan« \vhi> 1\^iA )h^)>!^\^^v«) 
throDgh great hardships for fifteen year«» and \rhi> a» \^^t haiA ^^HvtNtn) 
no support or enooniagement beyond medtUa aoci'iniuu^ W tv^)H^U(ltt;V 
and a bonus of j£20. The last tx^'o yeai^ tlu^ )>uUlu> )mi^ hUunvu an 
awakening interest in sericulture tlux>ugh tlie aixiouv a:iu) t>K^|\«t^u^v 
of Mis. Neill, than whom no one soeina num> <;>a|Hib)<> ^4" iuMjvtriMi^ 
people with zesl for the work she hei^elf hajs vuulort^i^koiu A latUt^^ 
Gompany has been formed, and tlie beat Ku^jwhwi ^n\\\\ in mH>lvt*^l» 
and dispensed by them to pupils duly qualiHod U) tnliiOHtt^ it^ A U\r^rkt^i 
has been opened in Europe, tlie giuin luul cotHM))m hiv pi^ttuninuH^ii of 
firstKslaas quality, and it only remains to fwUll tht^ imviinHt i>f wimt w«« 
begun with so much spirit. 

It is high time that the Gk)vemment of Victoria HlnniUI form a |M»op0V 
estimate of the value of sericulture, in onh^i* to t^xtdtitl to it ilmt fiwl^i'- 
ing support for which it languislios. Tlio (^liinoNo iUI«^n *MJmt p\^\\\i 
acres of mulberry plantation can be madu an valuablo M 100 aort^M of 
farming land." 

ROPES, JUTE, AND COIIl. 

The manufacture of rope and twine in in Vicf/Ot'la mnl*i<I o» by ootM 
paratively few persons, but the fc3W who givo iUnU' ilinti tmd m\iUM Ui 
this branch of trade appear to Ije making it a payioj^ )/o»hM<>«Mi St'tumiih^ 
to the Government returns th<;ro an? 1/5 rtf\)*twti\kH »umJ iwiu^ fm^Uitltifi )m 
the colony. Three of them employ HUmut tfUi^ltum Ut w</rk U*« tim4'\t)ht$iy. 
and the total number of work[x^;pKi tiWjAoyt'A tu twi^tlit^ tuw ttmi^i)tt\ 
into cables, ropes, line, string, and iwi/i/? //f jml) thi/;k/M^fc«<^j* i^ 'Ji^tH, 'l%t^ 
information at hand is not Kuch hh U) tthixhU', uk Ui (^iv<t i\m v^lMi< ttf iU^ 
work turned out jesLrly by Yu^t/jriau rojMi ;amI iwlui^ $fhiktitHf Uai, fttm 
returns submittei to th^ CV>Tfjrrji>,KJ/;ii/?r*, ihry f*.tii tu a iMft^khm Ut my l\m\i 
one ropewalk in a M*rUx/urrj^ Ktiburb >i^** 'i'//./.j( tl^i^ \ntiii yt^^r \fit4*tr4j\ 
£9500 worth of twbsxed iihr*}, aufi tl^at ikttf/^JjKt tnift^ tth4 *?M imViu^ 
isucioiy has reskih^ £'^1.27 ^K A thi/d fo^M^^fr^^.H; "s^Urp^ utwtui4 W^f*^hk 
only is employed. prvi^-^A Uf xhft ttzu-sii ^A K* ; Vy. 

In the fabrifiia/^T. </ ^^r^kvs* ujs/U'. *fu\y f/v,Vr ;v'>f;; U./-M, Hft; ^.t, j/^^><cAr/4 
two €stabii-Lif-*T.*j% zr. w^t. stfyl xh^ '^//^z/.i^M y*v',.i '^ \f^ /y.A^/,vr*/ »//#i^ 
product in. 1»74 »*«* £Z2':*/, Tf^-. a^/^^.^-*?l^ %»/.v;;?^ ^;yy^ f4.^^,j/.j} i.;^ 
amount a/xyr^ fijftc.-o.'jr'jtj^ ar^'*: «:/^,;,^ •*('/,\'^M-»fx^ <fA . 1^4 A yi^ ^/v^/v^at^ 
of hands C'jz.pl'.^^fj ii iutjr./..;f V^r:?-*, ^ ^J ^^<-5^.; ^ '^i n*m^'i4 w^A y>>; 
and 5*i Idtd& Wi.2«t ':x '^iiP: ;vv>>'i»vr>r;Ay v*w>, 'jcy^'/tx//^ 'U'm , VrAi.^ U^/m 
£2 to £3 I'X j«r v*«j:;: »*,tti^3J. *iJU^ af^.*u*; ^^-/u. W- ^ V/ t^ ^*v ^*'**^ 
Lida frotn ^ Vy IC^ 



96 CATALOGUE OP THE 

HAIR. 

There are three establishments where horse-hair, etc., is dried and 
curled, one of which sends on the market £3500 woiiJi of goods yearly. 



Group 17. 

ATKINSON, WILLIAM, Ewan's HHl, Maridayallock, Camperdown. 
1624a Teazles — one stave, containing 300 head. 

BROWNE, G. W., WoUombi, N.S.W. 

1625 Raw Silk, in natural and artificial colours, consisting of cocoons, 

fioss, skeins, and reels. 

CAIRNCROSS, MRS., Williamstown. 
1625a Silk Cocoons. 

DIRECTOR OF THE BOTANIC GARDENS, Melbourne, 
Fibre prepared from Bark of — 

1626 Sterculia acerifolia (The Flame Tree). 

1627 „ diversifolia (Victorian Bottle Tree). 

1628 „ foetida. 

1629 Abutilon venosum (Veined Lantern Flower). 

1630 „ mollis (Soft-leaved Abutilon). 

1631 „ striatum (Streaked Lantern Flower). 

1632 „ Bedfordianum. 

1633 Lagunaria Patersoni (Norfolk Island Cowitch Tree). 

1634 Bcehmeria nivea (Chinese Grasscloth Plant). 

1635 Sparmannia Africana. 

1636 Laportea gigas (The Tree Nettle). 

1637 Sida retusa (Queensland Hemp). 
Fibre prepared from Leaves of — 

1638 Doryanthes excelsa (Spear Lily). 

1639 Phormium tenax (New Zealand Flax). 

1640 Dianella latifolia. 

1641 Cordyline indivisa (Tall Palm Lily). 

1642 Fourcroya gigantea (Giant Lily). 

1643 Agave Americana (American Aloe). 

1644 Yucca gloriosa (Adam's Needle). 

1645 „ aloifolia (Aloe-leaved Adam's Needle). ^ 

1646 „ filamentosa (Thread-bearing Adam's Neeole). 

1647 Pandamis utilis (Screw Pine). 

1648 Dracoena Draco (Dragon's Blood Tree). 

1649 Cordyline pumilis (Dwarf Palm Lily). 

1650 Astelia spe (New Zealand). 
Fibre prepared from Stems of — 

1651 Caryota urens (Jaggery Palm). 

1652 Juncus vaginatus (Small Sheathed Rush). 

1653 „ „ (Large Sheathed Rush). 
Fibre prepared from Bark of — 

1654 Dombeya Natalensis. 

1665 Sterculia Delabechii (Bottle Tree). 
1656 Commersonia Fraseri (Tye Plant). 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 97 

1657 Sida pulchella (Victorian Hemp). 

1658 Hibiscus splendens (Hollyhock Tree). 

1659 „ heterophyllus. 

1660 Plagianthus betulinus (Kibbon Tree, or Lace Bark). 

1661 Eucalyptiis obliqua (Stringybark). 

1662 ,, fissilis (Messmate). 

1663 Pimelia axiflora (Currijong). 

1664 Piptui-us propinquiis (Queensland Grasscloth Plant). 
Fibre prepared from Leaves and Stems of — 

1665 Lepidospei*ma flexuosa (Slender Sword Rush). 

1666 Cladium radula (Black Reed). 
Tow prepared f«om — 

1667 Bark of Sterculia diversifolia (Victorian Bottle Tree). 

1668 „ ,. acerifolia (N. S. Wales Home Tree). 

1669 Stem of Cordyline indivisa (Tall Palm Lily). 

1670 „ Caryota urens (Jaggery Palm). 

1671 „ Boehmeria nivea (Chinese Grasscloth Plant). 

1672 Bark of Eucalyptus fissilis (Messmate). 

1673 „ „ obliqua (Stringybark). 

1674 Leaves of Dianella latifolia. 

1675 Stems of Juncus vaginatus (the Sheathed Rush). 

DONAGHY, MICHAEL, Rope Works, Geelong. 

1676 Rope from Manila and New Zealand Hemp. 

HOWARD, JOHN, near Albury, New South Wales. 

1677 Sample Cocoons of 35 different kinds of Mulbeny Silkworms, 

with wound silk in its natural colours. 

1678 Floss Silk. 

1679 Japanese Gi*ain. 

1680 Italian Gi-ain. 

1681 Hanks of Suffocated and Pierced Cocoons. 

LONGMIRE, THOMAS, Kooroocheang, Smeaton. . 

1682 Flax. 

1683 Two Samples of Flax Stalks, and Seed thereon, Nos. 1 and 2 

No. 1 sown on 20th May, 1874, No. 2 sown on 1st Sep- 
tember, 1874. Both samples grown on similar land, the 
only difference being in time of sowing. 

M^DOUGAL, MISS, Spring Bank Station, Winton. 
1683a Silk Cocoons. 

MCPHERSON, T., 205 Boui-ke-street West, Melbourne. 

1684 Jute, in i-aw state. 

1685 Jute, manufactured into Sacks and Woolpacks. 

MILLER, J., & CO., 61 Flinders-street, Melbourne. 

1686 Manufactures of Hemp, Flax, and Jute, consisting of Sacking, 

Cloth and Bags. 

1687 Samples of Coi'dage. 

PETTIT, GEORGE EDGAR, 33 Latrobe-sti-eet East, Melbourne. 
1687a Silk, manufactured in Latrobe-street 
1687b Silk Cocoons. 

H 



98 GATALOGUS OF THB 

SHARP & SONS, Malvern. 

1688 Manila lines. 

1689 New Zealand Rope and lines. 

1690 Flax, Twines, and Cordage. 

SHAW, CHARLES, 39 litde Collins-street^ Melbourne. 

1691 Flax, prepared and ready for Tnamifacturing purposes (grown in 

Victoria). 

TIMBRELL, ANN, Plenty-road, Collingwood. 

1692 Cocoons produced by silkworms from Japan, France, Italy and 

Greece. 

1693 Silk (raw material, in hank). 

1694 Victorian Silk, iv'orked on Brussels net. 

1695 Japan Black and White Silkworms, modelled in wax. 

The two small cases of Victorian silk, containing trade samples of 
cocoons and hanks, natural, bleached, and dyed; besides Brussels net 
sprigged with raw material, models of black and white Japan silkworms 
with mulberry leaves in wax, were awarded a bronze medal at the 
Sydney Intercolonial Exhibition, 1873. 

TRONSON & RUTHERFORD, 35 Lygon-street, Carlton. 

1696 Woollen Flocks or Shoddy, manufactured from old rags. 

VICTORIA LADIES' SERICULTURE COMPANY (Managing 
Director, Jessie Grover), Mount Alexander, Castlemaine. 

1697 Silk, Desiccated and Pierced Cocoons. 

WILLIAMSON & CO., 86 Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

1698 Curled Hair. 

ZOOLOGICAL AND ACCLIMATISATION SOCIETY OF 
VICTORIA. Albert A. C. Le Souef, Hon. Secretary. 

1698a Mohair, Angora Goats' Hair of Victorian growth. 



DEPARTMENT 7. 
WOOL. 



EXPERTS. 



J. H. aongh, Esq. I Hugh Parker, Esq., Chairman. I P. N. Walker, Esq. 
J. H. Halliburton, Esq. I Jules Renard, Esq. | Squire Ward, Esq. 



The Wool trade is — ^not even excepting the gold-mining interest— -the 
first in importance in the Australian colonies. Of course, from an actual 
money point of view, the amount realised by gold-mining exceeds that I 
derived from the sale of wooL Gold-mining is, however, precarious, and 



now that tlie alhiTiiniis are nearij worked out> ami miuii^t ^t ik^ptha 
invobres the onda j of capital and time^ it is more so than ^\^x\ W iKx)- 
growiiig^ on the contrarj, affords a permaaeut and t^aout"^ oc)0\imtia»x, to 
which Gi^ta]ist8 can turn their attention* It may be wged Umt wool- 
growing is also precaiions; reference will he made to tlte ctoi^tiiuitnl 
drought of a few years ago^ and it will be ^Kuuted out how wnnt of 
water entailed death to Uie flocks and nun to the si|uatte)\ ThiH \h 
true, and it is not to he expected that ^e pix^pitioua seasoika which have 
existed for the last four or live yeara will last foi* ever« Thot4e who 
follow pastoral pursmts have leaiiit a lesson fi*om their own miHiWixiu^H, 
or from the bitter experience of othera. Over the length M\i\ Xn'mMx 
of Australia precautionary measm'es against tlie evils iuliiutetl by )a\)< 
tracted drought have been taken. At enormous ex))euHe dry watm^ 
courses have been made into peimaneut rivei*s, I'eHarvoiiti auil ttvukH 
have been formed, wells have been dug, dams have bemi madt^, tuul 
stations have been so provided with 'such a water supply tJmt, with thn 
exception of isolated cases, a i*ecuiTence of tlie catast^'unhe of tlia yt^av 
1866 need not be feai-ed. The occuimtion of wool-gi'owiug is iuuititt-wiug 
day by day, as the flock-masters push tlieir way into the iutarioi', 
What were but a few years ago "Back Blocks," aiiotlier imuie for the 
uUima ikvl& of civilisation, ai*e now jjopulous distriots (H)nt«iiuing 
thriving townships and hamlets. The vast tracts of country, uukuuwu 
untU trodden by the unfortunate Burke and Wills, are dotUnl with 
station homesteads, and the Babel of voices about tlie slmariu^-Nhtnl is 
now heard where but a short time ago the stilluess of the Itush wiis only 
broken by the cooee of the blackfellow. Northward Ho will so(ju be the 
cry, and it will not be long before adventurous men will lie foiuul to try 
the capabilities of the Northern Territory, ojiened up by the tr»iUS-(W)Mtl- 
nental telegraph line, for sheep-farming. Great therefore as the wool- 
gi*owing interest of Australia is, it has not nearly reached the limit of 
its extent or impoiia.nce as yet. 

As compared with New South Wales and QueeTiskml, with tht^ir 
immense areas, the annual increase in tlie wool grown \\\ Vi/^t^iria 
is not large; but if it be considered wlmt extent of hiiid hfoi 
been taken up, and how rapidly selection luis l^een goiog oii, ax A 
how little is left for the fv^uatter U^yotid whiit im hiit owu by 
purchase, then it must be conceded tliat the snuillest iii thi^^ (uAtmWVf 
manages to hold its own. 8ome iidea of the luiij^oitij/ie id i\m VUU^ 
rian wool trade may be gatlwijrwi from tlie fa/.-t, thiit for iliM y^Air muhtii 
31st March^ l«f75, th^re were exfK>ru^l 4^f%(f^)//J'i l\^, id t/^fimiiy WinA^ 
6,879,963 WfSL acxmred wool, 36,416,3/)5 Urn. watiln-aif n^fn^titthiini^ a 
money value of £6,373.641, Thi« iij/eluxlw a larj^e i^nsiuUty id wtnA 
grown in the RireriiM; Difctri<rts fA New fyyutL Wiiii:*^ but it hi im\^)^i\/\M 
to arrive at the exact ^mjyjrxiosi, 

MessnL Goldfebrr/u^ k 0>/^ MomLIy Cxr<^uhir f</** Ft^hnju^Y, I H7Tt, i^tau^ 
that during last iifisxiifm 14-4.33-> Jjai** wei% i»iMiX</'/^)jtA mA l<)'i,ifjf) iuU^ 
sold, the hu^geist <juajuijty hJ\hffrUj oii'*fi*id ajid h^/A w lJ>e <y/hjhy in oia^. 
year. ll*e wiiksB made j^-pi^ebeirt a luou^r-y xkuhw, <A £^.^//>/></y tJW^Jjjj^- 
These laiJTse <ij.i«r^tiuu« ^Ixow tita-t xh^ ittW'ifcc-tivnj^ <A' tljjuj juj^j'k<H i^m 

mt 



100 



CATALOGUE OF THE 



The condition of the clip last season was good, more especially the 
unwashed portions, the greater pai-t of which lots were secured by 
America, the dealers of that Continent having by their spirited operations 
gained the largest selection of Austi'alia's choicest flocks. The prohibi- 
tory tariff of the United States precluded American buyers from 
purchasing washed wools. 

From the 1st of October, 1874, to Febniary, 1875, the number of 
bales exported was 268,753, showing an increase of 28,116 bales over the 
corresponding period of the year before. In the increase must be 
included several thousand bales which in previous years were shipped 
from New South Wales and South Australia. The late extension of 
Victorian railways has induced many flock-owners to send their dips to 
Melbourne in preference to shipping from Sydney and Adelaide to 
London direct. The increased shipments from Melbourne and Geelong 
include nearly all the increase of the Australian colonies, in proof of 
which it may be stated that the exports of New South Wales show an 
actual decrease of over 11,000 bales, while from South Australia the 
increase is only 5000 bales. 

As an illustration of the wonderful progress made in the production of 
wool, Messrs. Goldsbrough and Co. have furnished the following state- 
ment of the number of bales exported each year from 1837 to the present 
time, and from which it will be evident that the pastoi^al resources have 
been developed at an almost tmprecedentedly rapid rate : — 

Table showing the Export of Wool from the Colony of Victoria, from 

1837 to the Present Date. 



1837 
1838 



BALBR. 

514 
942 



1839 1,810 

1840 2,770 

1841 5,043 

1842 8,095 

1843 13,112 

1844 13,724 

Oct. 1 to Oct. 1 BALES. 

I860,, 1861 76,595 

1862 87,717 

1863 89,021 

1864 118,672 

1865 132,608 



)) 



>» 



1861 

1862 „ 

1863 „ 
1864 



1* 



balbs. 

1846' 18,122 

1846 20,843 

1847 30,029 

1848 30,954 

1849 42,844 

1860 53,209 

1851 48,074 

1852 58,963 

Oct. 1 to Oct. 1 BALKS. 

1865,, 1866 145,137 

1866,, 1867 175,216 

1867 „ 1868 208,689 

1868,, 1869 217,936 

1869,, 1870 211,630 



BALKS. 

1853 61,301 

1854 67,642 

1855 66,424 

1856 64,612 

1857 60,520 

1858 63,282 

1859 63,706^ 

1860 71,393 

Oct. 1 to Oct. 1 BALKS. 

1870,, 1871 ...... 224,34f) 

1871 „ 1872 216,021 

1872,, 1873 231,581 

1873,, 1874 265,540 



Note. — Up to 1860, the Betuma are made out for each year inclusive, and are 
approximate only ; the Customs clearances being given in pounds weight, which 
we have divided into bales. From October 1, 1860, to October 1, 1874, our own 
Ketums are copied. 

Contrasting the shipment of 514 bales in 1837 with the enormous 
aggregate of 265,540 bales exported last year, it must be a matter of 
surpiise that such a result has been attained in the comparatively shoii; 
space of thiiijy-seven years. Taking a modei*ate estimate of value, the ship- 
ments of last year would probably represent over <£6,000,000, and this 
does not comprehend nearly the entire revenue derived from |)astoral 
pursuits, as the value of the tallow, hides, sheep-skins and other animal 
products must be added. 



ESTEBCOIjOmAI. EXHIBITI09, 1 875. 101 

The dimate oC Australia is most £iToiiiable for sheep and cattle, which 
thriTe w<MideTfiillv. It is espedallj suited for the Merino sheep, which 
here attains its best dcTelopment ; oonseqaently the wool produced has 
achieved a high standard of excellency, unsurpassed, if indeed equalled, 
in any other part of the world. This is due chiefly to the enterprise 
and judgment of flockowners, who have spared no cost to import and 
produce the most Taluable sheep that can be bred. 

A recent return published in London states that for seven years past 
there has been little or no increase in the im|x>rts of wool from South 
America, the total yield for 1874 being 237,458 bales, whilst the yield 
for 1868 was 234,916 bales. The fact that the supjily of 1874 only 
shows an increase of 2542 bales over that of 1868 can scarcely £ftil to 
csiuse suq>rise when we take into consideration the almost boundless 
extent of county generally believed to be available for sheep £urming 
in the different provinces; in &ct, only a few yeai^s ago, so lapid was the 
increase of imports from the River Plate, that it became almost a cause of 
alarm to wool-growers, a general reduction in the Tahie of the article, 
consequent upon ^i excessive supply, being anticipated. Various causes 
are assigned for the check which sheep-famiing has evidently sustained 
in the eountiy referred to, amongst which may be mentioned the diseases 
and epidemics to which sheep are stated to be subject, the mortality 
amongst the lambs during dry seasons, and the insecurity of tenure, 
aiising from the fi-equent disturbances. 

The increase from the Cape of Good Hope also has been much less 
than might have been anticipated, for we find that whilst in 1868 
141,916 bales were exported, the total yield in 1874 was only 164,194 
bale& 

The great increase in the production of wool has therefore been in 
these colonies; the total yield from Australia, Tasmania, and New 
Zealand in 1868 being 491,218 bales, whilst that of 1874 was 651,576 
Ijales. But this increase, large though it may at fii-st sight appear, has 
evidently not had a depreciating effect on the value of the article — on 
the contrary, wool has advanced enormously in value during the past 
four years, notwithstcnding a constantly increasing supply. At the 
beginning of last year there was an almost general impression that the 
great increase available for the year would inevitably have a depressing 
effect, and cause a reduction in prices, but the result has shown that the 
trade can readily absorb all that we have produced. £Ten in the sales 
of August and September, 1874, when the largest quantity hitherto 
catalogued in one series was offered, the total being 332,962 bales, so 
brisk was the demand that not only was the whole of the wool readily 
sold, but an actual advance of Id. to 2d. per lb. on the preceding series 
of May and June was realised. In fact, it is clear that although the 
production has increased, the demand has more than kept pace with it. 
New markets have been opesoed up, population has been increasing, the 
labouring clannoc have be^ prosperons, consequently the manufactured 
article has met with ready omsumption. So long as these causes c^erate^ 
and no warlike disturbanoes arise, no doubt the article will continue in 
full demand at satisfactory prices. 



102 CATALOGUE OP THE 

Group 18. 

ARMSTRONG, ALEXANDER, Wan-amtine, Shelford. 

1699 Washed Merino Lambs. 

1700 Washed Merino Ewes' Fleece. 

1701 Greasy Merino Ewes' Fleece. 

KEYNES, JOSEPH, Keyneton, South Australia. 

1702 Washed Pure Leicester Fleece. 

1703 Merino Wool (Ewe), 360 days' gi-owth. 

ROBERTSON, JOHN, 89 Lonsdale-street East, Melbourne. 

1704 Dyed Angora Goat's Fleece, grown and prepared by the exhibitor 

THOMAS C. THOMAS, Bay-street, North Sandridge. 

1705 Dressed Skin of Pui'e Romney 4-tooth Ewe (eight months' wool), 

bred by R. Muldoon, Esq., Boos. 

WATSON, ALEXANDER, Wambee. 

1706 Washed Merino Ewes' Fleece. 

1707 Washed Merino Lambs' Fleece. 

1708 Greasy Ewes' Fleece. 

1709 Pure Washed Leicester. 

WILSON, SAMUEL (of Ercildoune), Oakleigh Hall, East St. Kilda. 

1710 Fleeces Washed Fleece Wool, about 365 days' growth, washed 

with hot water and spouts. 

1711 Fleeces of Greasy Merino Fleece Wool, about 365 days' growth. 



DEPARTMENT 8. 
ANIMALS, LIVE STOCK, FISH, SHELLS, &c. 

EXPERTS. 
F. R. Godfrey, Esq., Chairman. A. A. C. Le Souef, Esq. 



Ed. Howitt, Esq. 



Wm. M*Culloch, Esq. 



The Australian climate is pre-eminently favourable for Live Stock, 
which thrive and inci-ease rapidly, the weather being generally through- 
out the year mild and genial. For cattle and sheep the climate and soil offer 
advantages possessed by almost no other country in the world, and stock 
of this description, whether from the rich pasture land of the vestem 
portion of Victoria, the broad plains of Riverina, the fertile pastures of 
the Darling Downs, or the vast tracts of country in NoHliem Queens- 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 103 

land, arrive at a state of excellence and condition that fully proves Aus- 
tralia to be second to no other country as the home of these two classes 
of live stock. We hear a sreat deal of the excellence of English beef, 
and invidious oomparisons^u* often made between it a^the meat 
exposed for sale in the butchers' shops of the chief towns of the Australian 
continent. A glance at the contents of the principal butchering establish- 
ments of Melbourne when exposed to please the eye of consumers will 
dispel all doubts upon the subject of Australian meat. It must be borne in 
mind that in the old country fat stock is conveyed from the breeder's 
pastm^e with all care. Comfortably transported to London and other 
large cities by mU, they amve L a oorpaiutively short time, and 
in a condition no worse than that in which l^ey left the fattening pas- 
tures. Here it is dilferent. Cattle have in most instances to travel long 
distances to market, and now that selection has so rapidly increased here, 
to do a great part of the journey between fences; that is, they have to travel 
along roads, where there is, of course, but scant pasture. This is notably 
the case with those cattle coming from Riverina, for although by the 
laws of New South Wales travelling cattle are allowed to depasture for 
a mile on each side of the road, the accommodation is not sufficient for 
the herds that weekly wend their way to the Victorian markets. 
These drawbacks must, of course, be detrimental to the condition of the 
animals. A beast, however, that is driven slowly from the pasture land 
to the stockyard of a station homestead, and which is left in quiet for six 
or a dozen hours, will present, when killed and dressed, an excellence of 
condition and an appearance of alternate fat and lean, which in the 
vaunted sirloins of tJie mother country form a theme of expatiation for 
writers whose pleasing duty it is, at each succeeding Christmas time, to 
vaunt the merits of the ''roast beef of old England. Great praise is 
due to Australian stockholders for the energy i£ey have displayed in 
their attention to breeding, and the prices obtained by many of the 
large breeders are a guarantee that their efforts in this direction are fully 
appreciated. There is a desire and a determination, too, on the part of 
stockowners to supply themselves with sires whose strain is undoubted, 
and in Victoria the credit and honour of being able to supply such 
undoubtedly belongs to the eminent breeders who for years have de- 
voted all their experience and time to improve the breed of Victorian 
homed stock. The number of Homed Cattle is 958,658, of which 
241,137 are milch cows, and 717,521 other cattle. 

The number of Sheep in Victoria at the end of March, 1875, was 
11,221,036. With the sheep farmers the long-wooUed sheep have 
gradually been coming into favom-, and lately, in some portions of 
Victoria, especially the North Eastern district, where a large portion of 
the ground is moist and marshy, the introduction of Komney Marsh 
sheep has been tried with success. In limited flocks the Merino has 
been tried in competition with the Lincoln and Leicester, and the 
crosses with these breeds and the ooarse-woolled sheep have been fonnd 
to be profitable. The Linooln thrives well here, its fleece being remark- 
able for weight or Inrightness of staple; and the cross with the Merino 
prodnoes a wool held in much favour by manufacturers. By mKoj, the 
I^DCobi is looked upon as too lai*ge-framed and coarse to cross with ^e 



lOi CATALOGUE OF THS 

Merino, but the experience of some years would appear to prove the 
fallacy of such a dogma. The Lincolns that have been imported have 
not been much larger or bigger in the bone than the Leioestersi and 
have the advantage of yielding nearly double the weight of wool. 
Some years ago Co^wold and Southdown were the favourite varieties, 
but the wool was found to be dry and harsh, and as the fleece was found 
to be of more importance than the carcass, these varieties made way for 
others. Without wishing to institute a comparison between Australian 
and English mutton, it can safely be said that Australian mutton will 
satisfy ^e palates of connoisseurs who have dined oS Welsh and South- 
down mutton. 

During the last few years experiments have been tried with the 
Angora Croat. Pure-bred animals were obtained from the Acclimatisation 
Society, as well as half-bred goats, and these form the nucleus of 
what may, at some future time, prove valuable flocks. As far as it has 
gone the experiment has proved successful, the price obtained for the 
wool comparing favourably with that obtained in other countries, and 
being such as to ofler encouragement to still fmiiher prosecute the 
breeding of the Angora goat. 

Australia has almost since its first discovery been famous for its 
Horses. The New South Wales stock horse, a race now almost 
extinct, is still fondly remembered by old identities, who love to dwell 
upon its breeding, speed, agility, and endurance. The last quality is 
particularly the great characteristic of Australian-bred horses. The 
Arab, in its native desert, is, if subject to long and forced journeys, 
cared for by its owner. We are told how it is tenderly groomed, and 
how it is offered protection from climatic influences by being allowed to 
share the tent of its master. No such care is vouchsafed to the Australian 
bush horse. After each successive day's journey it is relieved of its 
saddle and, perhaps hobbled, is tmned out to look for provender, which 
is often scanty enough, especially in summer, and stUl, morning after 
morning, the animal is ever fresh and ready to carry its rider another 
day^s journey. The Australian stock horse is a genus per se. To see 
him in his element one must be present at mustering, and see him going 
through the intricacies of cutting out an obstinate beast. How he 
dodges, turns, stops, and turns again in a manner that outvies the 
trained steed of the hippodrome, or the agility of the mustangs of the 
pampas. Of late years, much attention has been turned to the breeding 
of thoroughbred stock, and no expense has been spared in -importing 
sires and brood mares of undoubted pedigree. A visit to any of the 
principal breeders' establishments in Victoria, New South Wajes, or 
South Australia, and a peep at the yoimgsters, will show that breeding of 
blood-stock in Australia has been successful. Other proof will be found 
in the numerous entries for the sires' and mares' produce stakes, the 
prices that young etock realise at the yearly sales, and at the peifonnances 
of the Australian-bred youngsters on the turf It would be invidious to 
paridcidarise the breedera of blood-stock in Australia when there axe so 
many who have made for themselves a name. The same may be aaid of 
our draught stock. The best imported sires have been procured, and 
breeders have spared no pains to keep up tlie standard of this class «t 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 105 

Lorse, and the high prices which they realise for their three and four 
year olds is a proof that their efforts have been successful. The classes 
of horse in which some improvement might be made ai^ those of 
carriage horses and hackneys. These two classes, as specialties, seem 
entirely neglected, chiefly, it is thought, on aocoimt of the difficulty 
there is in obtaining brood maizes of the requisite breeding, size, and 
form, to produce progeny fitted for these two classes of horses. A 
number of Arab entires have lately been imported, but the time has not 
yet arrived to judge of their success as sires. Many of them have been 
taken to districts where there is a dearth of mares, and have been 
obliged to cover the weedy animals of the surrounding farmers or selectors. 
This is not giving them a fair chance. The Arabs which have, been 
imported do not average over 15 hands 1 inch to 15 hands 2 inches height. 
To produce anything like good stock they require big, roomy, well 
ribbed up, broad backed, strong loined mares, not too coarse in breeding, 
and these are just the class of which there is a decided deai-th. Until 
such however are obtained, trials of a cross with the Arab will not obtain 
a fair chance. There were in Victoria at the end of March, 1875, hoi'ses 
to the number of 180,254. 

All Englishmen are fond of Dogs, and here in Australia the axiom 
holds good to its fullest extent. For years past great attention has been 
paid to the breeding of setters and retrievers by gentlemen who have 
taken care to import dogs from the best kennels in England. Latterly 
the energy that has been displayed in co\irsing has turned attention to 
Greyhounds. As no expense has been spared in importkig dogs and 
sluts that have figured creditably in the old country, or whose pedigree 
is inscribed upon the "Doomsday Book" of Altcar, there can be but little 
doubt that greyhound breeding in Australia will prove successful. 

The feeding of Pigs forms an adjunct of dairy work, but prices just 
now will not permit the farmer to indulge in pig farming to any great 
extent. He cannot compete with those who buy lai*ge mobs and allow 
them to run in the bush until thought fit for market, or with those who 
import them from the east settlements of New South Wales, where 
they are reared for little or nothing on swampy or inferior land, and fed 
for a few weeks on maize when large enough for shipment to the Vic- 
torian market from Sydney. At the end of March, 1875, there wei-e in 
Victoria pigs to the number of 137,941. 

The Wild Animals of Australia are but few. The Kangaroo and other 
marsupials of thi^ class still continue numerous, and consume so much 
grass on the squatters' runs that battttes have to be held to keep them 
down. Opossums and Kative Bears inhabit the gum forests, and in 
sandy districts the Wombat forms his burrows, while the duck-bill Platy- 
pus still haunts the banks of our rivers and streams. The Native Dog, 
the bane of the squatters' flocks, is, as population extends, becoming 
scaroer. The Tasmanian Devil, the most repulsive and fiercest looking 
animal in existence, and the ferocious Tasmanian Tiger, although once 
inhabiting Anstcalia, as proved by the teeth found in the WeUington 
caves and also in Vietoria, are now ocmfined to Tasmania. 

Hares have been snocessfully introduced into the colony, and have 
thriven beyond expectation. They breed three times a season for once 



106 CATALOGUE OP THE 

in the mother country, and have as many as six or seven at a birtli. 
Babbits are exceedingly abundant, and they are killed wholesale fox* 
food for the Melbourne market, and, notwithstanding, they are with. 
difficulty kept within bounds. 

The Birds of Australia are not numerous. The Emu is the monarcK 
of the feathered tribe of Australia. This species of the ostrich possesses 
the same strength, speed, and wonderful powers of digestion, as the rest 
of the genus. The chief of the other Australian birds are the Native 
Companion, the Bustard, commonly known as the Wild Turkey — now 
becoming somewhat scarce, except on the plain country of Biverina — 
the Laughing Jackass or SettWs Clock, the Mopoke, Hawks, various 
varieties of Cranes and Waterfowl, and the Black Swan, and the 
Native Goose, a bird most unlike its farmyard namesake, and the Bronze- 
wing Pigeon and the Mallee Hen. The talkative Cockatoo and the chat- 
tering Magpie must not be forgotten, nor the variegated Parrokeets 
of Australia, the varieties of which are legion, and the various classes of 
Hawks. Of the game species there are the Black and Wood Duck, Quail, 
Snipe, and Plover. Sad havoc was made with these species by those so- 
called sportsmen who were wont to slaughter them all the year round. 
Since, however, the game laws have enforced a close season, the num- 
ber of these birds has again begun to increase. Pheasants and Cali- 
fomian Quail have also been acclimatised, and promise to be a success. 

For years great attention has been paid to the rearing of Poultry and 
Singing Birds, as a list of the exhibits at the yearly poultry shows will 
testify. The success that has attended the breeding of this class of 
feathered stock is in a great measure due to the efforts of the Poultry 
Society of Victoria, to excite by their prizes an emulation amongst 
breeders. 

One of the exhibits in the Exhibition is a handsome and complete col 
lection of edible birds, waterfowl, game, <fec. This collection is from thd 
Melbourne market, and the specimens, scientifically named, are intended 
for scientific information, as well as to represent the supply of the 
market. 

The Beptiles of Australia are numerous, some of them being venomous, 
the bite of the Scorpion and Tarantula exceedingly so. The White 
Ant is most destructive to timber, and the bite of the Bed and Bulldog 
species is very severe. Alligators are to be foiuid in the tropical rivers 
of the continent. Snakes are found all over Australia, the chief species 
being the Black, Brown, Carpet, Tiger, and Whip Snakes, and the Death 
Adder. Some of these, such as the black and tiger snake, and the death 
adder, are known to be so poisonous that death is the result from contact 
with the fangs that contain the virulent juice. Science has been at work, 
and Professor Halford, after numei'ous experiments, boldly asserts that 
ammonia, if injected in time, is a specific against the bite of these reptiles. 
Other experts deny the efficacy of the treatment, but although much has 
been said and written on both sides, the preponderance of testimony rests 
with Professor Halford. One difficulty exists in fully proving the pnK 
lessor's assertions. In the most cases where a person is bitten the xeptile 
escapes, and it is nearly always impossible to identify the class to which 
the snake belonged. As it is asserted that some varieties of snakeSj the 



VSTEECOUOISIAL EXHIBITION, 1S75. ^^* 

carpet snake to irit, are harmless, it is m^!^ that many of the bites trmted 
with ammonia would have |iroved innoociious as fu* as loss of li^ is con- 
cerned, eren if Professor Halford's tre«itment had not beai resorted to. 

As a oontanst to the apathy that exists with regard to natural sdence 
in this oonntry, must be mentioned the useful labours of the Acclimatisa- 
tion and Zoological Sodety, which, with limited mequis, has not only 
formed the nndeos of a fine menagerie of living animals, but has exerted 
itself to introduce the natural products of other countries, which may 
one day prove to increase its naturd wealth. 

FISHES. 

Amongst fishes the perch family (PerciJfw) has a numerous representa- 
tion. The chief of the freshwater perch is the Murray Cod (Oliifof'^fs 
Maoquariensis) which ofien attains the weight of over 100 lbs. When 
fi-eshy and first taken from the Mun^y, it is a good fisli ; but after a 
joiuney by rail to Melbourne it loses much of its flavour. Anotlier 
mistake is vending the larger fishes of from 30 to 60 lbs. weight, Tliey 
are coarse, the best size for eating being those weighing from 5 to 8 lbs. 
This fish has been introduced by the Acclimatisation Society into the 
Yarra, and small specimens are often caught. 

The Gippsland Perch (Lates colonorum) is very similar to the sea soii:, 
and is frequently brought to Melbourne in the winter time. This fish 
wiU, however, not stand a long carriage, and to be frdly appreciated must 
he eaten fresh. 

The most important of the Murray fishes after the cod is the Golden 
Perch (DtUes auratus), which sometimes weighs up to 6 or 7 lbs. There 
is also the Murray Silver Perch (Therapon Bichardsoni ), found in nearly 
all the streams of Riverina, and often bix>ught to the Melbourne market. 

The genus Arripis is entirely Australian, and is repi-esented by the 
Roughy (Arripis Georgianus) and the Salmon Trout (A. truttctctus) 
the full-grown specimens of the latter being called salmon by fishermeiu 
Both specimens are frequently brought to market, but caution is requi^, 
as their flesh often causes psonful |x>isoningy which sometimes resuts in 
death. The Red Gurnet (Vpeiveidtthys porosus), belonging to the family 
of MuUidce, is a welcome table fish, and is remarkable for its beautifid 
carmine hue and the pretty blue sti-ipes of its head. 

The most important of the family of the Spaindcb ai-e the Snapper 
(Pagrua unicolor) and the Bream (Chrysophrys Australia )y the first of 
whidi often weighs upwards of 50 lbs. It is remarkable for its beautiful 
pink and red colours, and is an excellent table fish. Tlie bream never 
attains large dimensions, but is esteemed as an ai'ticle of food, and is 
always plentiful in the Melbourne market. 

Black Perch (Melanicthys tricuspidaia) so calliid from its colom*, is a 
good eating fish, and is frequently obtainable, but another sort, dai'k gi'oy, 
with broad transverse black bands, is far more rare. 

The Butterfish (Chtdodactylus macroptenis) is one of the commonest 
in the Melbourne market. 

Hie Hobart Town Trompeter (Latris Hecaieia), is a fish that finds 
favour with the Australian gourmets. It is often from two to thi-ee feet 
long, and has four broad longitudinal bands extendmg over its genenilly 



110 OATALOOUE OF THE 

The Gai'fisli ( Hemiramphtis mekunocJivr) is abundant throughout the 
yeai', and is one of the best bi*eakfast'fish. Its chief characteristic is the 
extraordinary length of its jaw. 

Whitebait (Eiigratdis Antarcticus) are common in the fish market. It 
is larger than the English whitebait (which i& allied to the herring 
family), and when fi^esh is good eating. 

The Pilchard (Culpea sagax)^ which is caught in lai^ge numbers during 
the summer months, is very delicate eating. It appears to be the only 
representative of the Culpea we have, and is supposed to be closely 
allied to the Japanese species. 

The Smelt (Mdetta Novce Hollandice), a light gi-een pretty little fish, 
is common and is good eating. 

A large Conger (believed to be Wilaoni of Black) is very common 
towards Hobai-t Town, and is often brought salted to Melbourne. It 
rarely appears in Hobson's Bay. 

The Leather Jackets (Sclerodermi) found in Victorian watei s. are not 
generally used as food, though fishermen say that when their thick skin 
has been removed they are not to be despised. 

Toadfishes (Tetrodon), Sunfish (Orthagoriacua), and Globefish (Dio- 
don) belong to the Gyninodontea, a class possessing dangerous qualities, 
many of the sorts being poisonous. 

Sharks and Kays belong to the order FlagiostomcUa, Of the latter 
several sorts are brought to market, the most common being the Bai/a 
Lemprieri and the Raya rostrata. 

Two sorts of Lamprey (Geotria Australia and Mordada Mordax) are 
found here. The first acquires sometimes an extraordinary pouch, which 
gives it a singular appearance. Lampreys in all coimtiies are esteemed a.s 
food. • 

Several varieties of Eui'opean fish have been introduced into Aus- 
tralia, such as Salmon Trout, Brown Trout, English Perch, and Caii>. 
All these, except the Salmon, are known to be a success, and increasing 
rapidly. Several of the inland lakes are abundantly stocked with Pei-cli 
and Carp, and Brown Trout have been captured weighing 9 lb. 

One of the exhibits is a collection of over forty different kinds of 
edible fish and others. This is intended for scientific information as well 
as to represent the supply of the Melbourne market. 

The Victorian Oyster is almost extinct, owing to over-dredging ; exj^- 
liments are, however, being made to re-establish it. The principal 
supply used in the Melbourne market is imported from New South 
Wales and Queensland, and sold under the name of Sydney Kocks. 

The Shells of Victoria are not, either in size or quality, such as to com- 
mend them as objects of ornament. Some beautiful samples are, how- 
ever, imported from the South Sea Islands, and receive their final polish 
in Melbourne. The same may be said of coraL 

Some beautiful specimens of Algas are found about the coast, and 
when grouped together in harmony of colour form prietty seawee<1 
pictures. 

Wlialebone is obtained in small quantities from Tasmania, where 
wlmle fishing is carried on to a limited extent, and is used by some 
of the Victoiian aHisans in the business of their trades. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. Ill 

Group 19. 

CAMPBELL, ARCHIBALD, I., Greemstreet, Windsor. 

1712 Collection of Victorian Birds' Eggs. 

PRENTICE, WILLIAM, Rae-sti-eet, North Fitzroy. 

1713 Stuffed Birds. 

FRENCH, C, Botanic Gardens, Melbourne. 

1714 Collection of Australian Longiooms and BuprestidsB, destructive 

to timber by boring. 
1714a Australian Lepidoptera. 

HART, LEWIS H., Royal Aixjade, Melbourne. 

1715 Animals (stuffed). 

NORTH, A. J., 3 Cecil-place, Emerald HiU. 

1716 Victorian Birds' Eggs. 

ST. JOHN, F., 22 Chetwynd-street, West Melbourne. 

1717 Collection of Edible Birds, Water Fowl, and Game, from the 

Melbourne Market, named and intended for scientific infor- 
mation. 

1718 Serpent (Python from Siam) found alive in the state-room of a 

ship at Siam. 



Group 20. 

ATKIN, C. A., 43 Errol-sti-eet, Hotham. 
(Non-competitive. ) 

1719 Aquaria, salt and fresh water. 

1720 Coral, from Fiji 
17^1 Fungi, Victorian. 

BEAN, MRS. HARRIET, North Richmond. 

1722 Case of Seaweed. 

ST. JOHN, F., 22 Chetwynd-street, West Melbourne. 

1723 Collection of Edible Fish, representing the Melbourne Market, 

intended for scientific information. 



DEPARTMENT 9. 

ANIMAL PRODUCTS USED AS FOOD, OR AS 
THE BASIS OF MANUFACTURES. 



EXPERTS. 



Hon. Wm. Bayles, M.P. 
C. F. Creswell, Esq. 
Dr. Wm. Gillbee. 



Br. T. M. Girdlestone. 
J. W. Kirkland, Escj. 
Geo. Lyell, Esq. , Chairman 



Matthew M*Caw, Esq. 
Germain Nicholson, Esq. 



PKESERVED MEATS AND HAM AND BACON CURING. 

Very few years ago Messrs. Crosse and Blackwell, Fortnum and Mason, 
jind other celebrated London purveyors had the monopoly of the world. 
Now, thanks to individual enterprise and the fattening capabilities of 



112 CATALOGUE OF THE 

Australia, Victoria was enabled to enter into competition with tlie old> 
world manufacturers. In this year of 1875 meat rules considerably 
higher than it has done for some time past, and Meat Preserving is not 
flourishing as a trade. During the past year so many meat preserving 
companies have been compelled by non-paying results to stop work, 
that it is almost impossible to fairly estimate the value of the industry. 
Of 00111*86 it will be imderstood that game pi*eserving can only be carried 
on dui'ing the open season. Beef and mutton are preserved mostly for ex- 
portation, but there is a fair demand for them in districts remote from the 
great centres of population, and on board the intercolonial steamers the 
article is also a considerable item in the pix»vidore*s stock. The most 
prominent items on the list of Australian "canned" meats of an epi- 
curean order are sheep's tongues and curried rabbit. Australia is rich in 
waterfowl, but as ducks come under the Game Act, the demand for 
them during the season is too great to peimit of their finding their way to 
any extent into hermetically sealed cans. Babbits have since theii" 
acclimatisation multiplied so greatly as to become the farmer's deadly 
enemy; but as a pair of fat ones can be bought in the streets for Is. 6d., 
there is but small request for the article in a tin packet. 

The black swan is by no means a ra/ra avis hei'e, but is little cared for 
as an ai-ticle of food, though when "jugged" it can hardly be dis- 
tinguished from hare. 

Hares have, since they were let loose from the Acclimatisation 
Society's grounds, been most carefully protected by Government, and 
though they bid fair to rival the rabbit in prolificacy, they are not as- 
yet quoted in the market price. 

The total number of meat preserving and curing establishments in 
Victoria is twenty-on^, nine of which employ steam-power. Jhe 
aggregate number of hands employed is 413, viz., 407 males and six 
females. The value of the plant and machinery is estimated at £22,325, 
the value of the land £13,310, and of the buildings £33,240. The 
aggregate wholesale value of the manufactures pixxluced in 1874 
amoimted to about £300,000. 

Austi*alia is the Fiiiit Garden of the southern hemisphere, and 
Tasmania is undoubtedly the forcing-house whei-e the finest specimens ai-e- 
grown. Queensland contributes its quota of pine apples ; and the oranges 
fromPaiTamatta are known tlux)ughout the length and breadth of Australia. 
Tlie great quantity of fruit grown makes prices reasonable, and the 
epicure can discuss his pine-apple at 6d. a-piece, and grapes at the com- 
mencement of the season for Is. per lb., a price that in a week or two 
declines to 3d. As a natural consequence, fruit-preserving and jam-making 
lias become a stable industiy, in the caiTying out of which Tasmania 
and Victoria take the undoubted lead. There are in Victoria eight jam 
manufactories, giving employment to 111 hands — ^ninety-four males- 
and seventeen females. Tlie value of the plant and machinery used 
is estimated at £1000; the land on which the factories are erected, 
£1415, and the buildings, £3035. The aggi'egate wholesale value of 
the manufactures produced in 1874 is estimated approximately to be 
£35,000. 

Oolonial-made Pickles are excellent; and the manufacture of Sauces is. 



INTERCOLOlflAL EXHIBIIXON, 1 875. 113 

rapidly becowdsig a.gi<owii]Lg and remimen^ive branch of tracte. Tomateos 
grow here in profusion, and form the staple of most of the sauces made. 
Colonial Worcester sauce is being produced in such large quantitues ' as 
bids fair before long to supersede the imported article, which is only 
slightly superior and twice as costly' to the consumera. 

The only manufactui*er . of Macaroiii in the ^lony is an Italian, who 
turns out five tons yearly, at an average price of £35 per ton. H^ also 
makes most excellent Dried Sausages, which compare favourably with 
the articles usually sold over the coimter as Bologna and Saucisson de 
Lyons. These sausages sell at £60 per ton. 

* 
GLUE, SOAP, CANDLES AND ANIMAL OIL. 

There are forty-three soap, tallow atui candle-making works, which 
massed together employ 354 male working hands, and twenty-four 
females. More than half of these factories use machinery worked by 
steam. To this list must be added nine mills, where glue is made and 
animal oil extracted from the refuse of slaughter-yards. These nine 
mills give work to thirty-six people, and in four out of the nine steam 
machinery is at work. From the forty-three factories twelve heads of 
establishments have sent to the Commissioners statements, showing the 
value of the marketable outgoings of their several places of business, and 
from the information thus given an idea of the value of the united trades 
may approximately be arrived at. Two glue-fa^^ries manufacture 
between them glue to the value of X2640 per annum; and one glue- 
making establishment, where animal oil is also prepared, sent upon the 
market during the year 1874 prepared material worth £3000. The 
nine owners of soap and candle works give the total value of the goods 
they produced during the past twelvemonths at £127,540. 

The rate of wages in the glue-making, soap and chandlery trades is at 
the rate of £2 5s. per man per week, and lads may easily earn from 10s. 
to £1. 



Group 21. 

BIRD, GEORGE, Inkerman, Lyndhurst 

1724 Colonial-made Cheeses. 

FITTS, CHAS., <fe SONS, 67 Cecil-street, Emerald^Hill. 

1725 Glue. 

1726 Animal Oils. 

GRIMWOOD, THOS., Fern Tree Gully Hotel. 

1727 Skins. 

O'KEEFE, ANDREW, Adelaide Vale. 
1729 Cheese. 



114 CATALOGUE OF THK 

PIERCE, G. G., Bourke-street East, Melbourne. 

1730 Cheese, from Stratford Factory. 

1731 Cheese, Bacchus Marsh Factory. 

1732 Cheese, Heidelberg Factory. 

RIDDELL, J., Lancefield-road. 

1733 Cheese. 

SUGDEN, T., Footscray. 

1735 Glue (light and dark). 

WALKER, F., Preston. 

1736 Ghie. 

VOCKLER, JOHN, Footscray. - 

1737 Gelatine Glue. 



Group 22. 

BENNETT, T. K., Bourke-street East, Melbourne. 

1739 Preserved Meats and Soups. 

BORSA, BATTISTA, Hepburn. 

1740 Zamponi di Modena, 201b. 

1741 Swiss Spiced Beef, 131b. 

1742 Satsiccioni di Milano, 221b. 

1743 Swiss Dried Sausages, 121b. 

EDMANSON, T. G., Little Canada, Beechworth. 
1745 Bacon and Hams. 

HALL & CO., 176 William-street, West Melbourne. 
1747 Preserved Fresh Meats, Fish, and Poultiy. 

KIERATH, CHARLES, Cornish Town, Lower Indigo. 

1750 Sausages and Black Puddings in German Rothwurst. 

1751 Sausages (raw meat) in German Withwurat. 

1752 Bacon and Hams. 

MELBOURNE MEAT PRESERVING COMPANY (S, S. Ritchie, 

Manager), 56 Queen-street, Melbourne. 

1753 Preserved Meats of various descriptibns. 

1754 Entries, Soups, &c., in canisters, from 1 lb. to 16 lb. The canis- 

ters coloured red were preserved for the Exliibition of 1872. 

1755 Extractum Camim. 



INTBBOOI^NUL EXHIBITION, 1875. 115 

8EC0MBE, B., Ulladulla, New South Wales. 

1768 Preserved Milk, in a condensed form, prepared by a new process^ 
of which the exhibitor is the inventor and manufacturer. 

STEELE & CO., 147 Flinders-street West, Melbourne. 

1759 Tierces Beef. 

WATSON & PATERSON, Bourke-street, Melbourne. 

1760 Ham, Bacon, Lard, Mess Pork, Beef, and Hams. 

WESTERN MEAT PRESERVING COMPANY, Limited, 

(C. M. Farrington, Manager), Colac. 

1762 Preserved Meats — Beef, Game, Rabbits, Soups, &c. 



DEPARTMENT 10. 



LEATHER. 



EXPERTS. 



J.Car80!ii,En.,CludniuuL I Thomas Loader, Esq. | Hewy Stnden, Eiq. 
Thaaaa Lambert, Eaq. | A Bobertaon, Eaq. | 



So much has been written about the vast flocks and herds raised by 
Australian squatters, and so universally is it known that kangaroos and 
nJ>bitB multiply at this side of the world to such an extent as to became, 
like locusts^ a perfect pest to farmers, that little need now be said about 
the sources firtun whence are obtained the hides and pelts for tanning. 
Tasmaiiian Kangaroo leather is the best in the world for certain pur- 
poses. The Victorian skins, being inferior, are worked into whips, 
wh^ithoDgB, and laoes, and are exported for that purpose to the na^- 
bourii^ ookmies and California. A large number of Tasmanian skins 
are faMr»«<^ here, and a very large export business in them and in sheei>' 
skin of all sorts, firom the pelt widi the wool on to the same article 
tanned into besil, and various forms of fancy leather, is ihe results Tisi- 
tois to the Exhibition will be able to estimate for themselves not only 
the value of the leather oar tanpits can torn oot, but also the skiD of the 
craflM Dcn who manipulate the skins from their luw state nntfl they are 

i2 



116 . . CATAtiOGUE 6F TBX 

ready for saddlers, hamess-makers, bookbinders; shoemakers, and, in a 
word, all workers in leather. In the Colony of Victoria alone there are 
47 fellmongeries, and 87 tanneries; 27 of the tanneries use steam-power, 
arid employ 983 working hands. Among the fellmongers, fifteen factory- 
owners employ steam, and one establishment has its machinery worked 
by a water-wheel. In this branch of trade 911 persons earn their living. 
iSie average of wages in the two trades is £2 2s. per week for men, and 
about 15s. for young persons. It is impossible to give the value of the 
goods turned out in tanyards an<i f ellmongeries during the statistical year 
ending 31st March, 1875, as the value of the manufactures can only be 
obtained from persons willing to supply the desired information. From 
returns kindly furnished to the Commissioners by forty-two owners of 
fellmongeries and tanneries, it appears that the value of the merchandise 
sent out of these forty-two centres of labour, amounted during the past 
year to the sum of £701,729. At a fair estimate, our fellmongers and 
tanners are now producing pelts and well-tanned leather worib about 
£2,000,000. 

From the raw material we come to the most prominent articles of use 
to which leather is put after leaving the hands of the tanner. 

The nimiber of Saddle and Harness manufactories in Victoria is set 
down in the official records as sixteen, and none of them employ steam 
motive power, though their machinery and plant is estimated at £1800 
value. The mast^ fiaddlwfJ • give work* to. 34^ males (including, of 
coiu-se, lads and apprentice's), "lllere a;re fbur sAdcfie-tree factories in the 
colony, one of which possesses steam machinery, and the four combined 
give employment to twenty-two workers, lie rate of wages in the 
saddlery trade may be put. down as about £2 10s. a week per man. 
Besides the all-important item — ^leather, catgut and curled hair enter 
largely into the fabrication of saddlery. In the colony there are two 
factories where catgut is made, and one of them tirnis out per «.Timim 
catgut and other articles made of the twisted intestines of cattle to the 
value of £2400. A considerable nimiber of Victorian saddles are sent 
to India, and some, principally for hunting purposes, to England. 

Whip and Thong factories are officially recorded as three in number, 
but only one tradesman in Victoria devotes himself entirely to whip- 
making. He has imported the very best machinery that can be pro- 
duced, and turns out weekly whips to the value of between £60 
and £70. The moimtings — except for presentation whips — come from 
the. old country; but the catgut and leather used are all coloniaL 
Australian twisted gut is considered by the trade to be much better than 
the imported article. The cane used in whipstocks is made from 
"dunnage," or, in other words, the split lengths of cane used to bind 
Mauritius sugar bags. Two-thirds of the whalebone worked up is 
imported ready split, but the other third comes mostly from Tasmania 
and is taken from whales killed in om* waters. In Europe and America 
pigskin is in geneiul use as a covering to first-class whip-handles, but as 
we do not dress hogshide here, kangaroo-skin takes its place and looks 
and wears equally well if not better. 

As a material for whipthongs kangaroo-hide cannot be surpassed for 
toughness and flexibility. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 875. 117 



Group 23, 

ALDERSON & SONS, Sydney, Nev South Wales. 

MANUFACTURED ENAMELLED AND JAPANNEP LEATHER. 

1768 Best Colonial-japanned Safety, Flap, "Winker, Dash, Whole-bide, 

Horse, Split, Horse Leather; Japanned Kaiigaroo Skins; 
Enamelled Kangaroo Skins ; Stout Enamelled Whole-hide 
Buggy-cushion Leather. 

Levant Yearling Leather. 

Kangaroo-skin Leather. 

Goat-skin Leather. 
1768a Set best Colonial full-lined four-horse Drag Harness, black, brass- 
mounted, made from Colonial Leathers. 

Light American Trotting Collar. 

Australian Trotting Collar, Morocco Leather, Colonial-made. 

Prince of Wales Carriage Collars, Morocco-lined ; Patent-leather 
Cat Saddle ; Patent-lined Buggy Saddle. 

BLAKE & GRATTAN, 13 and 15 Boui-ke-street West,. Melbourne. 

1769 Lady's Saddle, quilted all over, with doeskin eaves and roU- 

cantle. 

1770 Lady's Saddle, with doeskin eaves. 

1771 Grentleman's Hogskin Hunting Saddle. 

1772 Gentleman's Stock Saddle. 

BREARLEY BROS., Geelong. 

1773 Sole Leather. 

1774 Calfskins. 

1775 Harness Leather, and other desciiptions of Colonial Leathers. 

CAREY, WILLIAM, Mansfield. 

1776 Kip Leather, from tannery on the Broken River. 

ELDER, JOHN, Sydney, New South Wales. 

1777 Lady's Saddle, all hogskin, quilted off side and pocket, specimen 

of raised leatherwork, made on extra plated saddle-tree 
ornaments in mauve. 

EYTON, THOMAS, 95 Queen-street, Melboimie. 

1778 Saddlery. 

FORSYTH, MR., Panumatta, New South Wales. 

1779 Leather. 



118 CATALOGUE OP THE 

GARBUTT; JOHN, 17 Leicester-street, Carlton. 

1780 Scotch and American Hames, Chains, &c. 

GREGO & LORD, 37 Elizabeth-street North, Mellxmme. 

1781 Set of Scotch Dray Shaft Harness (complete). 

INSPECTOR-GENERAL OP PENAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

1782 Skins Leather, Calf. 

1783 Skins Leather, Calf. 

1784 Skins Leather, Calf. 

1785 Sides Kip. 

1786 Harness Black Leather. 

1787 Sides Leather, Sole. 

KEYSTON, JOHN, 36 Bourke-street, Melbouiiie. 

1788 Whips. 

MICHAELIS, HALLENSTEIN & CO., 30 Lonsdale-street Eaat, 

Melbourne. 

1789 Sole Leather, Harness, Kip, Calf, Kangaroo, &c. 

PEARSE BROS., Fremantle, Western Australia. 

1790 Dugong Fish Hide. 

1791 Sides Black Harness. 

1792 Sides Black-grained Kip. 

1793 Wax Kangaroo Skins. 

1794 Wax Calf Skins. 

1795 Sides Black Wax-grained Kip. 

1796 Grained Kangaroo Skins. 

1797 Grained Calf Skins. 

ROBERTSON, WAGNER & CO., Coach Factory, Castlemaine. 
1797a Set Double Carriage Harness and Horse Collars. 

ROTHWELL, WADE, 52 Bourke-street West, Melbourne. 

1798 Harness. 

1799 Saddles. 

SMITH, J. J., & CO., 198 Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

1800 Hide of Sole Leather (cross). 

1801 Hide of Kip Leather. 

1802 Skins of Colonial Calf, &c. 

WALUS & CO., Burnley-street, Richmond. 

1803 Assortment of Fancy Leather. 



INTERCOLONIAL BXHIBITION, 1875. 119 

DEPARTMENT 11. 

TEXTILE FABRICS, CLOTHING, UMBRELLAS, 
FANCY LEATHERWORK, PIPES. 



EXPERTS. 



Orlando Fenwick, Esq., 

Chainnan. 
J. H. Halliburton, Esq. 



W. T. Moffatt, Esq. 
Andrew King, Esq. 
S. G. King, Esq. 



George Stdrling, Esq. 
John Morris, Esq. 
S. Wallworth, Esq. 



A OOMPARATIVELT new industry in Victoria is the manufacture of 
Woollen Cloths. Although an attempt was made some years ago to 
establish a woollen mill in Melbourne, the venture at that time was not 
brought to a successful close. To Geelong belongs the credit of having 
been able the first to establish a factory of this description^ and to 
commence active operations. With such beneficial results wa^ the 
venture attended that Melbourne and Ballarat soon followed suit. 
There are now in wo;rking order six cloth manufactories in Victoria^ all 
employing steam-power. The aggregate number of hands employed is 
462, ue. 350 males and 162 females. The aggregate value of the plant 
and machinery is £97,000. The value of the land upon which the 
factories are erected is £5350, and of the buildings in which the busi- 
ness is carried on £47,500. Tie Commissioners caused inquiries to be 
instituted as to the wholesale value of the manufactures produced in 
1874, and information upon the subject was requested from the owners 
or managers of each factory. Some have neglected to comply with the 
I'equest, and hence only an approximate computation of the value can 
be arrived at. The wholesale value of the products during 1874 is 
estimated at £75,000. One factory employs 68 hands, viz., 25 men, 33 
women, and 10 young persons. The men's wages average 40s., the 
women's 15s., and the young persons 10s. per week, the working hours 
being 10 per day. The wholesale value of the manufactures produced 
during 1874 was £13,700. Another factory employs about 80 hands; 
the wholesale value of the manufactures produced during 1874 being 
£11,000. 

There are 43 manufactories in Victoria, all of which are in full working 
order. The demand for colonial clothing is fast increasing, and year by 
year the imports of foreign slop clothing are growing less and less. 
ScMne of the largest soft-goods warehousemen have combiued the 
manufacture of clothing with the other branches of their business. 
Under the head of clothing manufeu^tures are meant Crimean shirt facto- 
ries, tailoring establishments, mantle, dressmaking, and millinery, 
underdothin^ crinolines, frilling, and fancy trimmings. The number ci 
clothing factories from which returns have been received is 43. They give 
employment to 3897 hands; of whom 3308 are females, and 589 are 
miikB» The value of the plant and machinery used is £12,513. The 



120 CATALOGUE OF THE 

value of the land occupied is estimated at £51,410, and the value of 
the buildings at £55,880. fHie a g g i ' BgB G t e' ^n^geg paid during the year 
1874 are estimated at £180,274. 

Of Hat and Cap manufactories there are 14, one of which employs 
steam power. The aggregate nimiber of hands employed is. 156, 1)eing 89 
males and 66 females. The total value of the plant and machinery used 
is £3285, the value of the land upon which the factories are erected is 
estimated at £7320, and the value of the buildings wherein business is 
carried on may be set down at £9375. One factory in Melbourne for 
the manufacture of felt hats by patent machinery, furrying and wool- 
scouring for hat-making purposes, gives employment to 21 hands — 10 
men, 5 women, and 6 young pereons — and taking the extent of the 
premises, machinery and plant into considei-ation, work could be given, 
if wanted, to four times the number of hands at present employed. The 
working hours are 8 per day, and the weekly earnings of the employes 
are as follow: — Men, £3; women, 28s. ; young persons, 10s. The whole- 
sale value of the manufactures produced in the year 1873 was £4000. 
Another establishment with eight hands — 5 men, 2 women, and 1 young 
person, turned out work in 1824, the wholesale value of which was £1344. 
The average working hours are 8 per day, and the weekly earnings are 
— men, £2 10s.; women, £1; young persons, 6s. A hat manufactory 
at Ballarat gives employment to 4 hands — 2 men, 1 woman and 1 young 
person : the earnings per week being — men, £4 10s.; woman, £2 6s.; 
shop boy, 7s. The wholesale value of the manufactures produced in 
1874 was £550. 

The manufacture of Fur enters largely into the native industry of 
Australia. The skins of the indigenous animals are all adapted for rug- 
making purposes, and are capable of not only being made useful, but of 
being rendered pleasing to the eye. The skins of the opossum and native 
bear make plain sei-viceable travelling rugs, and can be tastefully 
ornamented by insei-ting a few squares of the beautiful skin of the rock 
wallaby or the variegated coat of the native cat. Kangaroo rugs are 
useful as mats for inside doors or dressing tables, while the skin of the 
emu, with the plumage attached, forms a pleasant and somewhat 
pictiQ'esque hearthrug. The skins of the platypus, pelican, and black 
swan are also much used. Tlie skin of the flying squirrel makes jwretty 
muffs and feet-wanners. There are in Victoiia two manufactories, in 
which 9 hands are employed — ^viz., 3 men and 6 women. Of course these 
are strictly manufactories, but there are algo a number of retail establish- 
ments, where the skins after they have been prepared are made up 
into articles of use and luxury. The prices that rale for skins are as 
follow: — Grey opossums, 4s. per dozen; black do., £1 per dozen in the 
rough; native cats, from 3s. to 8s. per dozen; bibbies, from 8s. to 128. 
per dozen; platypus, from £1 10s. to £3 per dozen; emu, from 3s. to 
10s. per skin; pelicans, from £1 per dozen; kangaroo, small sorts, from 
4s. to 8s. per dozen; wallaby, the same; swan, 30s. per dozen. 

Felt-making is likely to become an important industry in Australia, as 
since the acclimatisation of the English rabbit, felt-making fur can be 
obtained to any amount. All th^t is wanted is a market for the article, 
and when that market is open there will be no lack of enterprising 



INTERCOLOKIAL EXHIBFTIOK, 1875. ^^^ 

Victorians ready to prepare machinery, and' supply the public with any 
felted article material from a hat of the newest style to a s3<ddlficloth« 

Of Oilskin and Waterproof Clothing manufactories there are four, 
giving employment to 59 hands — 16 males said 4d females. There ai-e 
also in the colony manufactories of Umbrellas, Fancy Leather, and Myall 
Pipes. 



Group 25. 

AUSTIN, SUSANNAH, 210 and 212 Little Collins-street East, 

Melbouma 

1804 Handwork Hearthrug. 

BALLARAT WOOLLEN COMPANY (Limited)^ 44 Lydiard-street, 

Ballarat; James "Webb, Manager. 

1805 Shawls. 

1806 Flannel. 

1807 Tweed. 

(All manufactured at the exhibitors' Factory at Ballarat.) 

1808 Samples of Patterns of Printed Shirtings, stamped by Anthony 

Dockery, of Smeaton, on Ballarat-made Flannels. 

BARWON WOOLLEN MILL COMPANY, Geelong; Thomas 

Carter, Secretary. 

1809 Blankets manufactured by the Barwon Woollen Mill Company, 

Geelong. 

BOTANIC GAKDENS, DIKECTOR OF, Melbourne. 

1810 Woollen Cloth and Silk, dyed with bark of Laportea gigas — 

the Tree Nettle, Queensland and New South Wales. 
Prepared by W. R. Guilfoyle (A 5). 

1811 Woollen Cloth and Silk, dyed with husks of Sterculia diversif olia — 

the Native Bottle Tree, Victoria. Prepared by W. R. 
Guilfoyle (A 6). 

1812 Woollen Cloth; also, piece of Silk, dyed with bark of Pimelia 

axiflora — Currijong of the aborigines, Victoria. Prepared 
by W. R. Guilfoyle (A 4). 

1813 Woollen Cloth; also, piece of SUk, dyed with bark of Dais 

cotinifolia. South Africa. Mordanted with acetate of iron. 
Prepared by W. R. Guilfoyle, director of Melbourne 
Botanical Gardens. 

BREARLEY, MARIA, Studley Park Road, Kew. 

1814 Smoking Cap, in glass shade. 

1815 Lady's Pocket. 

1816 Strips of Painting. 



122 CATALOGUE OF THE 

GRAY, ALSXAND£B» <fe CO., Albion Woollen Mills, Geelong. 

1 820 Tweeds, Plain and Fancy. 

, TREVET, KICHARD, 42 Faraday-street, Carlton, Melbourne. 

1821 Oolcmial Sofa Cover, in Berlin-wool. 

VICTORIA WOOLLEN CLOTHING MANUFACTURING 

COMPANY, Newtown and Geelong. 

1822 Tweeds. 

1823 Shawls. 

1824 Blankets. 



Group 26. 

ADDIS, MISS JOANNA, Lesney-street, Richmond. 

1825 Flower Painting on Silk, in leatherwork frame. 

HATFIELD, MRS. E., Prahran. 

1826 Fancy Work, in wool and silk. 

RICHMOND, A. E., 97 and 99 Bourke-street East, Melbourne. 

1828 Silk Costume. 

1829 Apron and Jacket. 

Group 27. 

AITCHISON, HANNAH LOUISA, Domt-street, Carlton, 

Melbourne. 

1830 Ornamental Antimacassar. 

CHANNAN, A. CHARLES, Benalla* 
1830a Table Cover, Pincushion, and small Quilt. 

COHN, LEAH, comer of Collins and Queen streets, Melbourne. 

1831 Muffs and Collarets of Opossum Skins. 

1832 „ „ „ Pelican Skins. 



1833 
1834 
1835 
1836 
1837 






Swan Skins. 
Platypus Skins. 
Emu Skins. 
Water Rat Skins. 
Native Cat. 



1838 Rugs of Opossum Skins. 

1839 Rugs of Kangaroo Skins. 

1840 Mats of Kan^Etroo Skins. 

1841 Mats of Opossum Skins. 

DAVIS, BLANCHE B., 12 Wangaratta-street, Richmond. 

1842 Crotchet Quilt. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. ^^^ 

DECOTJRTET, MADAME SOXJLIE, 92 RusseU-street, Melbourne. 

1843 Stays. 

1844 Shoulder Straps. 

1845 Ladies' Belts. 

1846 Wax Figure. 

EDGCXJMBE, MRS. E. R., Chapel-street, Windsor. 

1847 Ladies' Ball Bodies. 

FINNIS, MRS., Franklin-street, West Melbourne. 
1847a Crochet Counterpane and other Work. 

GAY, MARIA, 103 Spencer-street, West Melbourne. 

1849 Crochet Counterpane. 

HARRIGAN, MATTHEW GEORGE, 89 Swanston-street, Melbourne. 

1850 Hunting Coat, Trousers, and Vests. 

HART, LEWIS W., Royal Arcade, Melbourne. 

1851 Rugs, Furs, &c. 

HILL, CHARLOTTE, Victoria-crescent, Victoria-street, Hotham. 

1852 Quilt. 

HORSEY, SARAH, 17 and 19 Royal Ai-cade, Melbourne. 

1853 Ladies' Underclothing. 

1854 Children's Underclothing. 

1855 Infants' Underclothing. 

1856 Children's Costumes. 

1857 Infants' Robes, 

MARSDEN, ANNIE LOUISA, 7 Albion-street, South Yaii-a. 

1858 Antimacassar — Subject, " Elijah and the Ruvens." 

MELBOURNE SHIRT COMPANY (C. Henderson, Manager), 

Stephen-street, Melbourne. 

1859 Shirts. 

1860 Collars. 

1861 Fronts. 

1862 Cuffs, &c. 

MOSS, GEORGE, 11 Bourke-street West, Melbourne. 

1863 Furs. 

1864 Rugs. 

1865 Mats. 

PENAL ESTABLISHMENTS, INSPECTOR-GENERAL OF 

King-street^ Melbourne. 

1866 Warder^s Uniform, Coats, Vests, and Trousers. 

1867 Lunatic Asylum, Coats, Vests, and Trousers. 

1868 Straight Jacket 



124 CATALOGUE OP THE 

1869 Prisoner's Jacket and Trousera. 

1870 Cabbage Tree Hats, superior. 

1871 Cabbage Tree Hats, for prisonei's' wear. 

1872 HoTisewives. 

1873 Vegetable Nets. 

1874 Aboriginal Blankets. 
1876 Grey Penal Blankets. 

1876 White Blankets. 

POWER, ELLEN, Romsey. 

1877 Crochet Counterpane. 

RHODES, MRS. T. K., 70 Londale-street East, Melbourne. 

1878 Stays. 

STORER, JOSEPH, 83 Bourke-street East, Melbourne. 

1878a Fancy Braiding, Tucking, and Quilting, the work of Jones and 
Co/s Sewing Machines. 

TAIT, WILLIAM B., 85 Coventry-sti-eet, Emerald Hill. 

1879 Waterproof Clothing (Oilskins). 

VICTORIAN ASYLUM AND SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND, 

Melbourne. 
1879a Quilts, Rugs, <kc., the work of pupils. 

YOUNG, ANN, 2 Eden Villas, Drummond-fitreet, Carlton. 

1880 Knitted Quilt, material of cotton. 



Group 28. 

BISSIMIR, CHARLES, 77 Bninswick-street, Fitzi^oy. 

1881 Wire and Tulle Bonnet and Hat Shapes. 

1882 Paris Net and Buckram Shaj^es. 

BUCHNER & SON, J. S., 58 Gertrude-sti'eet, Fitzroy. 

1883 Hats and Caps. 

■ 

FORD BROS., 421 King-street, Melbourne. 

1884 Pith Hats, in Felt, SUk, Merino, &c. 

1885 Pith Sunshade, for horses (colonial-made). 

RICHMOND, A. E., 97 and 99 Bourke-street East> Melbourne. 

1886 Millinery Bonnets. 

1887 Millineiy Hats. 

SHORT & SUTTON, 51 Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

1888 Bonnet Shapes. 

TURNER, JAMES H., 50 Elizabeth-street, Melbourne, and Denton 

Mills, CoUingwood 

1889 Felt, used in manufacture of Hats. 

1890 Felt Hats. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 875. 125 

Gboup 29. 

ADDIS, SUSANKA, Lesney-street, Richmond. 
1891 Point Lace Cover for Sofa Cushion. 

BENTWICH, AliTNIB, 13 Tyne-street, Carlton, Melbourne. 

1893 Crochet Table Cover. . 

1894 Antimacassars. 

BXJERAGE, THOMAS A., 63 Swanston-sti^et, Melbourne. 

1895 Articles Embroidered with Gold and Silver. 

1896 Ornaments for Fancy Costumes. ■ 

GORDON, HENRY, High-street, St. Kilda. 
1896a Tortoiseshell and other Combs. 

HENTY, MRS. RICHMOND, Portland. 

1897 Point Lace on linen. 

1898 Point Lace on linen. 

1899 Finest Point Lace. 

1900 Crochet Sleeves. 

1901 Tatting d'Oyley. 

LEAHY, F. E., & CO., 70 Park-street, Emerald Hill. 

1902 Linen and Lace Sets. 

1903 Real Point and other Lace. 

1904 Underclothing. 

LONG & CO., 64 Elizabetli-street, Melbourne. 
1904a Work done on Sewing Machines exhibited by them. 

MACK & ELLIS, 80 Collins^itreet East, Melbourne. 

1904b Ladies' Underclothing. 

1905c Boys' Clothing. 

1906d Fnllings and Plaitings made by Machines exhibited in operation. 

MARTIN, CHAS. R., 3 Flinders-lane East, Melbourne. 

1905 Military Embroidery. 

1906 Masonic Embroidery. 

MURRAY, JANE ANN, 6 Stafford-street, East CoUingwood. 

1907 Crochet Work. 

POTTS, MRS. ROBERT, 174 Bridge-road, Riclmiond. 

1908 Point Lace Handkerchiefs. 

1909 Point Lace Collarets. 

1910 Imitation Honiton Handkerchief. 

1911 Imitation Honiton Collaret. 



126 CATALOGUE OF THB 

« 

TUFF^ ESTHER, Asylum and School for the Blind, St. Kilda-road, 

Melbourne. 
1912 Knitted Counterpane, material of ootton. 



Group 30. 

BAKER, MISS FANNY, 19 Andrew-street, Windsor. 

1913 Wool Flowers. 

BROWN, JAMES CLYDE, 64 Bridge-road, Richmond. 

1914 Dress Wigs, 

1915 Lady's Ornamental Hairwork. 

1916 Theatrical Wigs. 

CAPPER, MISS, City Police Court, Swanstonnrtreet, Mdboume. 

1917 Wool Flowers. 

DOS REIS, J. A., Albertwstreet, Creswick. 

1918 Feather Flowers. 

EVANS, VCTORIA, Leicester^treet, Carlton, Melbourne. 

1919 Wax Flowers. 

1920 Wax Fruit. 

FLATOW, MRS. JOSEPH, 26 Capel-street, Hotham. 

1921 Flowers, formed of Seaweed and Shells. 

GANT, ELIZA, 53 Toorak-road, South Yarra. 

1922 Ornamental Hairwork, mounted in gold. 

GASKELL, MRS., 118 I^izabeth^street, Melbourne. 
1922a Varieties of Wax Bush Flowers. 
1922b Tulips, &c., in Wax. 

GITTUS, THOMAS, 90 Swanston-street, Melbourne. 

1923 Umbrellas, in Silk, Russell Silk, Sateen, Zanella, Alpaca, &c. 

1924 Walking Sticks and Canes. 

1925 Carriage Umbrellas. 

GRAVEN ALL, MISS, Kent^street^ Windsor. 

1926 Wool Flowers. 

HASELDEN, HERBERT, Pelham-street, Carlton, 

1927 Artificial Hair Plaits. 

1928 Head Dresses. 

1929 Ringlets. 

1930 Berthas. 

1931 Head Coils. 

1932 Pads. 

1933 Stems, &c. 

LEE, BALINDA, Albion-street, Brunswick. 

1934 Lacework Flowers. 



INTERCOLONfAL EXHIBITION, 1875. ^^^ 

LEVIN, A., 124 iBourke-street East, Melbournfe. 

1935 TJmbrellas. 

1936 Parasols. 

1937 Walking Sticks. 

LEWELUN, G. R, Prahran, 

1938 Skeleton Leaves. 

1939 Skeleton Flowens. 

LEWIS & CO., 62 Little Collinfi-dtreet East, Melbourne. 

1940 Walking Sti<^k& 

1941 Carved Kangaroo Show Stick, made from Murray pine, per- 

sonally procured by the exhibitor in Everton Ranges, 
Victoria. 

1942 Walking Sticks, made from woods grown in Victoria only. 

1943 Walking Stick Mounts and other Jewellery, manufactured from 

Abyssinian gold. 

STAFF, MRS. C, 6 Royal Arcade, Melbourne. 

1944 Artificial Paper Flowers. 

1945 Artificial Paper Flowers. 

LOCKWOOD, ANN, 30 Osbome-street, Williamstown. 

1946 Wool Flowers. 

MACKENZIE, ENEAS, Post and Telegraph Office, Richmond. 

1947 Electric Walking Stick. 

MEMMOTT, WILLIAM, levers-terrace, Cardigan-street, Carlton. 

1948 Combs of every description : also, showing them in process of 

manufacture. 

MITCHELL, GRAHAM, Kirk's Bazaar, Bourke-street West, 

Melbourne. 

1949 Sim Shades for Horses, made of Calico or Linen. 

MULLER, FRED., Bridge-street, Ballarat. 

1950 TJmbrellas. 

1951 Materials for manufacturing the same. 

OWEN, MRS. J., Abbotsford-street, Hotham Hill. 

1952 Wool Flowers. 

1953 Leather Flowers. 

PEARSON, ELIZABETH, 63 Lygon-sti-eet, Cariton. 

1954 Paper Flowers. 

PHILLIPS, EMILY BERTHA, 2 Macquaiie-street, Pmhran. 

1955 Wool Flowers. 



128 CATALOGUE OP THE 

ROBERTSON, MISS, Albert Park, Emerald Hill. 

1956 Point Lace in frame. 

RIELLY, ISABEL, Eastbourne-street, Windsor. 

1957 Artificial Flowers made of Paper. Painted by exhibitor. 

TAYLOR, MRS. JAMES, Mitchell-street, Sandhurst. 

1958 Wax Flowera. 

TAYLOR, GEORGE, Maribymong. 

1959 Fancy Pincushions, made from polished Bullock Hoofs. 

TIMBRELL, ANN, Plenty-road, Collii^fwood. 

1960 Wax Flowers. 

WITHELL, MARY, Gatekeeper, Trawall Boat Line. 

1961 Feather Flowers, made by the exhibitor from feathers of 

Victorian Wild Fowl. 

WRIGHT, ALICE, 3 JeffcottHstreet, West Melbourne. 

1962 Wax Flowers. 



Group 31. 

CURTIS, JOHN, 62 Little Collins^street East, Melbourne. 

1965 Fitted Egg-top Ladies' Travelling Tnmks. 

1966 Fitted Egg-top Gentlemen's Trunks. 

1967 Solid Leather Folding Portmanteaus, with riveted iron frames. 

1968 Expanding Portmanteau. 

1969 Ribbed Riveted Iron-frame Railway Portmanteau. 

LEIGHTON, JAMES, 91 Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

1970 Portmanteaus, in leather. 

1971 Sample Cases, in leather. 

1972 American Trunks, in leather. 

PAUSACKER, EVANS & CO., 8 and 10 Lonsdale-street West, 

Melbourne. 

1973 Registered-edge Solid Leather Portmanteaus of colonial make, 

leather and workmanship. 

TIMBRELL, ANN, Plenty-road, Collingwood. 

1974 Leatherwork Fmnie. 






INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 129 

DEPARTMENT 12. 
BOOTS AND SHOES. 

EXPERTS. 
D. Bedggood, Esq. I . J. Faulkner, Esq. 

John Carson, Esq., Chairman. | 

The demand for Colonial Boots and Shoes lias largely increased within 
the last few years. The manufacturers have been able to successfully 
compete, in certain classes, with those of Europe, and the satisfaction of 
consumers will be found in the decrease of importation that, according 
to the Customs returns, has taken place. The factories for the manu- 
facture of boots and shoes, numerous though they ai*e, receive addi- 
tions to their number almost weekly. They are for the most part fitted 
up with all the latest appliances and the most approved machinery, 
and spare no expense to turn out a first-rate class of goods. There are 
in Victoria 42 boot and shoe manufactories, six of which employ steam- 
power. They give employment to 1809 hands, 1540 of whom are males 
and 269 females. The aggregate value of the machinery and plant 
employed can be estimated at £14,608. The value of the land upon 
which the factories are erected amounts to £18,963, and the buildings 
ai-e estimated at £26,845. The wholesale value of manufactures 
produced during the year ended 31st December, 1874, was about 
£400,000. 

One of the factories employs 165 hands, viz., 53 men, 35 females, 277 
young persons, the wages of whom average from 12s. 6d. to from £3 to £4 
l)er week. The working hours are 52 J per week. The wholesale value 
of manufactures produced during the year 1874 in this factory was 
£43,275. Another factory employs 255 hands, viz., 195 men, who earn 
from £2 to £2 10s. per week ; 32 females, whose weekly earnings amount 
to 16s. 6d. per week; and 28 boys, averaging 7s. x>6r week each — ^thus 
making a totisd of 255 hands. The working hours for boys and men are 
50 per week, and for females 46. The wholesale value of manufactures 
produced during the year 1874 was £40,000, representing 132,000 pairs. 
A factory employing 122 hands, viz., 45 men, 12 females, and 65 young 
pei-sons, turned out during the year 1874 manufactures to the value of 
£20,000, the hours of work being for males 9 to 10 hours a day, for 
females and young persons 3 to 9 hours daily. Another establishment, 
with 113 hands — 70 men, 18 females, and 25 young persons — ^turned out 
(liu-ing 1874 manufactures to the value of £25,000. At an establish- 
ment giving employment to 108 hands — 78 men, 9 females, 21 young 
l>ei'sons — ^the wholesale value of manufactures produced during 1874 
imoimted to £20, 16 2, and the sum paid in wages during the twelve months 
of the year reached £6268 10s. Two factories, employing 66 and 73 
hands, turned out during 1874 manufactures to the value of £13,000 
Jiud £12,000 respectively. The value of the manufactures produced by 
tlii-ee factories was over £10,000 each; by four over £5000. Some idea 
from these figures will be gained of the importance and manufacturing 
ca[)abilities of the Boot and Shoe industry of Victona. 



iso catalogue of thb 

Gboup 32 « 

GILLESPIE, CHARLES, Goulburn, New South Wales. 

1974a Boots and Shoes, factory work, made on iron lasts. Manufac- 
tured by exhibitor. 

HATTON, ALFRED, Ryrie-street, Collingwood. 

1975 Children's and Infants' Boots. 

LOWE, J. E., Skating Rink, 45 Stephen-street South, Melbourne. 

1976 Roller Skates. .. ; i - 

PENAL ESTABLISHMENTS, INSPECTOR-GENERAL OF, 

King-|treet, Melbourne. 

1979 Boots and Shoes — Elastic Sides, Gents' Shoes, Bluchers, Local 

Force, Penal, Asylum. 

RANKINE, WILLIAM, Jun., 101 Brunswick-street, Fitzroy. 

1980 Lasting Boots. 

ROELLENS & BURDETT, 14 BrunswickHstreet, Fitzroy. 

1981 Boots. 

1982 Shoes, Colonial manufEicture. 

ROSIER, JOHN, 46 Swanston-street, Melbourne. 

1983 Boots and Shoes, kc 

1983a Studies from the Feet of the Statues in the Statuary Galleiy, 
Public Library, &c, 

STORER, JOSEPH, 83 Boui-ke-street East, Melbouma 

1983b Ornamental Boot Uppers, Plain do., and Boot Closing, «S^, the 
work of Jones & Co.'s Machines. 

VICTORIA DEAF AND DUMB INSTITUTION, St Kilda-road, 

Melbourne. 

1984 Boots and Shoes made by Inmates of the Institution. 



department 13. 

jewellery and ornaments worn upon 
the person, gold and silver ware, 
presentation plate, &c. 



EXPERTS. 



Joseph Aarons, Esq. . j W. K. Thomson, Esq. 
Joseph Reed, Esq. | Fredk. Walsh, Esq. 

Among industries which have become established in Victoria, not the 
least important is the manufacture of articles of all kinds in gold, silver, 



I 



IKTEBCOLONIAL BXHIBITIOK, 1875. ^^1 

and preciotis stones. As might be supposed, the metropolis contains \}j 
far the lai^est nombear of establishmentSi but mudi fine wotk is produced 
in Ballarat, Sandhurst, Beechworth, and other towns in the interior. 

It is estimated that not fewer than 400 hands are now employed in 
various branches of these fine arts. Some of the ^pergnes, goblets, 
sugarbasins and jugs are specially interesting as Australian productions, 
because besides die precious metal dug firom our native soil, extracted 
from native rock, and fashioned by workmen who have made this their 
dwelling-place, there are in combination various substances, minei'al, 
animal and v^etable, entirely characteristic of Australia. As will 
be seen by a glance at the various specimens of silversmith's work on 
view in the Exhibition, the fern-leaf modelled in frosted silver greatly 
predominates, and properly too, for surely nature has not yet given 
birth to any leaf or spray more sweetly graceful. The bean of the 
Queensland supplejack, mounted in silver, makes very pretty lockets 
and vinaigrettes. The delicate pink shell of the Trigama is a charm- 
ing ear-ring when mounted in gold, and the speculum or stony sub- 
stance which closes the orifice of sea-snail shells forms when polished 
and strung together in numbers, with silver filagree chainwork, as 
charming a bracelet as need clasp a lady's wrist. South Sea Island 
pearl-shell and New Zealand greenstone also may be cut into pretty 
trinkets, mounted in gold or silver. 

Now for a word upon the subject of jewel-making and gem-setting 
from a mineral point of view. From this standpoint there is unfortn* 
nately little to say, for though we have gold galore, Australia is not rich 
in gems, although many varieties are to be found here. The diamond, 
topaz, and other stones have not hitherto been discovered in quantities 
or of qualities which have made their search remunerative. Native 
pearls are used to a fair extent, but neaily all the precious stones put in 
settings here are imported. 

Skilled jewellery hands are paid at the rate of from £2 10s. to £6 per 
week, and the total number of workmen at present employed in the 
jewellery and precious metal working business is — ^men, 129. 



Group 33. 

BLEASDALE, REV. J. I., D.D., St. Patrick's Cathedral, Melbourne 
1985 Collection of Grems. 

BENNETT & HOLLOWAY, 73 Elizabeth^treet, Melbourne. 
1985a Jewellery, principally .Colonial manufacture. 

CAMPBELL, PATRICK, Station-place, Sandiidge. 

1985b The primitive form of a Binarian <Jorundum or six-sided Prism, 
from which the Sapphire, the Ruby, and the Topaz binary 
bodies come. 

1985c Specimens of Stones adapted for ornamental purposes. 

k2 



I 



132 CATALOGUE OF THS 

Db RICHELIEU, FREDERIKKE, 70 Union^treet, Windsor. 

1986 Wreath for the Hair made of Fish Scales, Silver Wire and 

Roman Pearls. 

1987 Brooches made from Fish Scales, silver wire and Roman pearls. 

1988 Earrings and other Trinkets in Filagree Work. 

EMANUEL, S., Goulbum, New South Wales. 

1989 Opals, from Goulbum, N.S.W. 

KILPATRICK & CO., 39 Collins-street West, Melbourne. 

1990 Jewellery and Silver Plate. 

SPINK & SON, 80 Little Flinders-street East, Melbourne. 

1991 Colonial and other Precious Stones. 



Group 34. 

CRISP, GEORGE, Queen-street, Melbourne. 

1992 Silver Cups. 

EDWARDS & KAUL, 31 Collins-street West, Melbourne. 

1993 Silver Goods manufactured in the colony. 

GAUNT, THOMAS, U Bouike-sti-eet East, Melbourne. 

1994 Emu Egg Goods in Electro-plate. 

STURTEVANT, BUXTON, 31 Latrobe-street East, Melbourne. 

1996 Electroplate. 

1996 Caniage Mountings. 

1997 Electrotypes. 

1998 Medallions, &c. 

WHITNEY, CHAMBERS & CO., Swanston-street, Melbourne. 

(Non-competitive.) 

1999 Best Sheffield Plate. 



Group 35. 

DANKS, JOHN, 42 Bourke-street West, Melbourne. 

2000 Phospho Bronze Castings, in ingot. 

2001 Phospho Bronze Ornamental Castings. 

JONES, H., Sandhurst. 

2002 Bi-onze Statuette. 

2003 Bronze Statuette. 

2004 Bronze Statuette. 



Joseph Aarons, Esq. 
Wm. Harrison, Esq. 



INTERCOLONIAX EXHIBITION, 1875. 133 

DEPARTMENT 14. 

WOOD AS MATERIAL. 

EXPERTS. 

Johnson Hicks, Esq. I Thos. H. Thwaites, Esq. 

S. H. Roberts, Esq., Chairman | W. W. Wardell, Esq. 



The Commissioners have returns from two factories devoted entirely 
to the manufacture of Sashes, Frames and Dooi^s, the lai*gest of wliich 
employs 32 hands, viz., 12 men and 10 young pei-sons, the former of 
whom earn 10s. per day of 8 hours to £3 per week, and the latter from 
9s. to 25s. weekly. The wholesale value of the manufactui'es pi*oduced 
during 1874 was ^7500. The other employs 6 men at 10s. per day, and 
turned out work in 1874 to Uie wholesale value of X2000. 

There are five Steam Cabinet works in existence, employing 217 
hands — 213 males and 4 females. The value of the plant and machinery 
used may be set down at £6450, the value of the land £6900, and the 
value of the buildings X5050. The wholesale value of the manufactures 
produced during 1874 was approximately X70,000. The largest manu- 
facturer from whom the Commissionei-s had any returns, employs 87 
hands — viz., 70 men, 7 women, and 10 young persons, including 
apprentices, who earn — ^men, 50s. per week; women, 15s.; and young 
jjei-sons, 7s. 6d., the working hours being eight i>er day. The wholesale 
value of the work turned out in 1874 was £25,000. One chair, sofa, 
and cabriole-frame maker employs 45 hands — 25 men and 20 young 
persons, the former of whom earn £2 15s. per week, and the latter 128., 
the working hours being nine per day. The value of the manufactures 
produced in 1874 was £6000. Another chair and sofa manu- 
facturer, employing 24 hands — 12 men and 12 young persons, the 
foi-mer of whom earn £2 15s. per week and the latter 15s. — ^turned out 
in 1874 work the wholesale value of which was £3583. Of course the 
cabinetmakers who employ manual labour alone are too numerous, to 
attempt to obtain any statistics as to the number of men employed, or 
the wholesale value of the work produced. 

The largest firm of Wood and Ivory Tumei*s and Billiard-table 
makers employs 63 hands — 57 men and 6 young persons, who work 
eight hours per day, and earn — the former £2 14s., and the latter 21s. 
weekly. A factory devoted to the manufacture of American Chums and 
Trucks employs 5 hands — 2 men, 2 women, and 1 youth, the first and 
last of whom work eight hours a day^ while the women labour ten hours. 
The earnings are — ^men, 50s. per week; women, 9s. per week ; and the 
youth, 22s. per week. 

Another item to be taken in connexion with wood viewed as a 
material is the manufacture of Venetian Blinds, an industry that has 
gradually been extending, and which ha« the fervid heat of the Austrar 
lian summer sun to thank for the success that has attended it. There 
are in Victoria 6 Venetian blind manufactories. The aggregate number 



134 CATALOGUE OF THE 

of hands employed is 107, viz., 69 m^les and 38 females. The value of 
the plant and machinery Ia estimated at .£840; the value of the land 
upon which the factmies afe erected may be set down at £4600, and 
the buildings themselves at £2150. The total wholesale value of the 
manufactures produced in 1874 amounted approximately to £7000. 
Tlie largest manufactory of Venetian blinds from which the Commis- 
sioners have any return employs 1 1 hands — 8 men and 3 young persons, 
who work 9 hours per day, their wages amounting to £21 per week. 
The wholesale value of tlie goods produced in 1874 was £2106. 
Another Venetian blind manufactory employs 16 hands — 6 men, 5 
women, and 4 youths, who, working 8 hours per day, earn — ^men £2 
per week, women 15s., youths 10s. 

The number of Basket manufactories is 5, and they give employment 
to 107 hands — 69 men and 38 women. The' value of the plant and 
machinery is £840; the land, £4600, and the buildings, £2150. The 
aggregate value of the manufactures produced in 1874 amounted to 
£5200. The lai'gest manufactory employs 16 hands — 14 men and 2 
boys, who earn, the former from £2 10s. to £3 10s., piece work. The 
value of the goods produced in 1874 was £3640. Another gives 
employment to 4 men and 2 boys, who work 10 hours per diem and earn, 
the former £3 per week, piece work ; the latter 8s. per week. The value 
of the work turned out in 1874 was £1400. 

Brush and Broom making has become an industry of some import- 
ance. One manufacturer gives employment to 26 hands — 9 men, 5 
women and 12 young persons, who work 9 hours per day, earning — men, 
£2 10s., women, £1 5s., and young persons, 10s. per week. The value 
of the manufactures produced in 1874 was £5000. Another factory 
employing 12 hands — 3 men, 1 woman and 8 young persons — ^turned out 
in 1874 work to the value of £1600. The hours of work are 8, and the 
earnings — men, £3; women, £1; young persons, 10s., per week. A 
besom manufacturer employing 2 men, who each earn 20s. per week, 
turned out in 1874 work to the value of £110; while a man who grows 
four acres of millet for winter evenings' employment, assisted by his wife 
and three children, made, in 1874, 100 dozen brooms. He states he can 
make half a dozen per half hour. The aggregate value of the manu- 
facturers produced in 1874 by the four manufacturers who have sent in 
returns to the Commissioners, amounted to £9550. 



Group 36. 

ALCOCK & CO., 182 Russell-street, Melbourne. 

2005 Full-size Billiard Table, of figured Blaokwood, with Haon- 

Pine twist moulding on panels, and fitted with the patent 
Electric Marker. 

2006 Combination Dining; and Billiard Table, of Blackwood and 

Cedar. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 875. 135 

2007 Specimens of Spiral Twist Work in wood. 

2008 Specimens of Ivory Turning. 

BOOTH, H. 0., Clarendon-street^ Emerald Hill, Melbourne. 

2009 Blackwood Music Stool. 

2010 Warehouseman's Speaking Trumpet^ with cases. 

BOWIE, HELEN, Northcote-road, Pitzroy. 

2011 Gipsy Table. 
2012. Gipsy Chairs. 

BREARLEY, MARIA, Studley Park-road, Kew. 

2013 Pole Screen. 

2014 Banner Screens. 

2015 Cushion. 

BRICE, RICHARD, Vine Cottage, Neil-street, Carlton. 

2016 Inlaid Loo Table, consisting of over one thousand pieces of 

various colonial woods. 

BROWNING, GEORGE, 16 Therry-street, Melbourne. 

2017 Papier-mach6 Portfolios, panel inlaid with pearl and gold. 

COLVILLE, HENRY, 255 Smith-street, Fitzroy. 

2018 Maori Rug. 

COOKE, E. D., Franklin-street, West Melbourne. 

2019 Book Case. 

CORNISH & CO., 2 Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

2020 Ordinary Mattresses. 

2021 Seats for Railway Carriages. 

DELLIT, JOHN, 18 Flemington-road, Melbourne. 

2022 Arm Rocking Chair. . 

2023 Gentleman's Arm Chair. 

2024 Lady's Rocking Chair. 

2025 Sewing Chair. 

2026 Dining Chair. 

2027 Easy Chair. 

(The above made from Tasmanian Willows.) 

BELLOW, FRANCIS JOHN, Glenlyon-road, Brunswick. 

2028 Pair of Duchess Tables and Stands. 

DOUGLAS & CAMERON, 108 Flinders-lane East, Melbourne. 

(Non-competitive.) 

2029 Bright Parlour Grate. 

2030 Polished Fire Irons. 

DUNCAN, MRS. ALEXANDER, Royal Arcade, Melbourne. 
2030a Flowers painted on White Velvet 



136 CATALOGUE OF THE 

FLETCHER, REV. WM. ROBY, Hawthorn. 

2031 Drawing Room Fire Screen. 

HOARE, W. W., Public Library, Melbourne. 

2032 Small Round Table of Kauri Pine, decorated with paintings in 

sepia of Australian animals, birds, trees, ferns, and flowers. 

HYNES, FREDERICK M., 34 Somerset-place, Docker-street, 

Richmond. 

2033 Scrap Screen. 

M'EWAN, JAMES, & CO., 81 Elizabeth-street^ Melbourne. 

(Non-competitive. ) 

2034 Register Grates. 

2035 Fenders. 

2036 Sets Fireirons. 

2037 Tile Hearths. 

2038 Fireiron Standards. 

M'EWAN, JAMES, 361 Spencer-street, West Melbourne. 

2039 Eight-feet Sideboard, made of picked Richmond cedar. The 

carving enrichments consist of nine carved figures; the 
centre ornament, on glass back, represents the head of 
Minerva. 

2040 Model of the Fifty-feet Mahogany Telescope Dining Table to be 

made for the state dining-room, Government House; one 
and a-half inch scale. The model is half length. 

MCLEAN BROS. & RIGG, Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

2041 Patent Spring Mattress, light, compact, economical, cleanly, and 

extremely healthiiil in hot weather. 
2041a Opera Seats for Theatres, with turn-up seats. Advantages, 
economy of spa<;e, and the great facilities for allowing persons 
to pass one another. 

NORMAN, WILLIAM JAMES, 7 Collins-street East, Melbourne. 

2042 Gilt Console Table. 

2043 Gilt Fire Screen. 

2044 Gilt Brackets. 

2045 Gilt Oval and other Frames. 

PALEY, MRS. EDWARD, Yarra Bend, 

2046 Sutherland Table. 

2047 Coffee Table. 

PATERSON BROS., 3 Elgin-street, Carlton, Melbourne. 

2048 Tablets of Imitation Wood. 

2049 Tablets of Imitation Marble. 

PINNER, R., Fraser-street, Clunes. 

2049a Delicate Wood Carving in Limewood. Subject — '^The Vine." 
2049b Apples and Foliage do.* do. 



IirrERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 137 

ROGKE, W. H., & CO., GollinMtFeet Eest^ Melbourne. 

2050 Black and Gold Drawing-Room Suite, upholstered in rich 

canary-coloured satin, with blue satin borders and trimmings 
to match; consisting of Settee, Easy Chairs, Victoria Chair, 
6 Chairs, and Centre Ottoman, stuffed in all hair, designed 
and made in colonial blackwood by exhibitors. 

2051 Window Drapery, in canary and blue satin, trimmed with all 

silk bullion firinge, silk cord and tassels, silk rope, (&c., to 
match, with blad^ and gold Cornice, white Swiss jLace Cur- 
tains, and blue and gold Silk Curtain Holders. Designed 
' and made by exhibitors. 

2052 Silver-Plated Fender, Ashpan and Fireirons. 

2053 Black and Gold Pier Glass, size 80 x 60. 

2054 Mahogany Show Case, designed and manufactured by exhibi- 

tors, containing exhibits of French Gilt Chairs, in black 
satin, with needlework embossed flowers; inlaid mother-of- 
pearl Chairs, in satin; latest designs in Brussels Carpets; 
and a large variety of articles suitable for internal house 
decoration. 

SMITH, MRS. J. J., 291 King-street, Melbourne. 

2055 Devotional Chair, painted on white velvet. 

2056 Cushions, painted on white velvet. 

STANWAY, WILLIAM, Park-street, South Yarra. 
2056a Models of Invalid Chairs used in the Hospitals of Victoria and 
New South Wales, invented and made by exhibitor. 

STEIMLB, JOHN J., Cabinetmaker, 47 Westcott-st, West Melbourne. 

2057 Drawing-room Chair, style of Louis XIV. 

THOMAS, JOHN, 130 Bourke-street East, Melbourne. 
2068 Billiard Table, of shaded and mottled blackwood, 12^ feet x 6^ 
feet, with silvered glass panels. 

2059 Billiard Table, without glass panels. 

2060 Billiard Table, 6i feet ;x 3i feet 

TOPE, HUBERT, Sandridge-road, Emerald Hill. 

2061 Vein Marble Chimney Pieces. 

2062 Register Stoves. 

2063 Ashpans. 

2064 Sets Fireirons. 

WHITNEY, CHAMBERS & CO., Swanston-street, Melbourne. 

2065 Bronzed Hall Stand. 

2066 Canterbury Seat, suitable for verandah, lawn, or conservatory. 

2067 Croquet Seats. 

Gboup 37, 

GAMPI, ABBONDIO, 122 Russell-street, Melbourne. 

2068 Mantelpiece Mirror, solid carved gilt frame. 

2069 Console Table and Mirror to matcn^ in solid carved gilt frame. 



138 CATALOGUE OF THE 

GREEN, HENRIETTA, Sydneyy New South Wales. 

2070 Carved Frame. 

MUSSCHIALLI, LOUIS, 102 CoUins-street East, Melbourne. 

2071 Pier Glass. 

2072 Console Table. 

SOLOMON, S., & CO., Swanaton and Lonsdale-streets, Melbourne. 

2073 Large SHvered Plate, 10 feet x 6 feet. 
2073a Gilt Chimney Glasses. 

WHITEHEAD, ISAAC, 87 Collins-street East, Melbourne. 

2074 Gilt Console Table and Glass to match. 

2075 Gilt Chimney Glass. 

2076 Gilt Chimney Glass. 



Group 38. 

ADAMS, R. T., Princes Bridge, Melbourne. 

2077 Dahlke's Earthenware Filters, 2 gallons, 6 gallons, and 8 gallons. 

2078 Canvas Cooling Filter. 

2079 Canvas Filter and Wine Cooler, copper-silvered inside. 

2080 High Pressure Filter. 

2081 Syphon Filter. 

ANDERSON, JAMES, 127 Little Flinders-street East, Melbourne. 

2082 Washing Boards. 

AUSTRALIAN HANDLE & WOODENWARE MANUFACTORY, 
1 Queen-street, Melbourne (Thomas Davey and Co., agents). 

2083 Handles. 

2084 Woodenware. 

(Made entirely from Australian woods.) 

BAKER, JOHN, 32 Bank-street West, Emerald Hill. 

2085 Baker's Patent Safety Steps. 

2086 Baker's Patent Excelsior Washing and Wringing Machine, 

middle size. 

2087 Linen and Shawl Press, new pattern. 

2088 Clothes Horse, new pattern. 

BOGLE, ANDREW, & CO., 21 Flinders-street East, Melbourne 

2089 Household Help — Bogle's Patent Boot and Shoe Brushing and 

Cutlers' Polishing and Bharpening Machine. 

CHERRY, EDWARD, Gisborne. 

2090 Wooden Churns^ made bj the exhibitor. 



INTERCOLONIAJi EXHIBITION, 1875. 1^^ 

DRAPER & SONS^ 83 Bourkenstreet West, Melbourne. 
2091 Patent Earth Closets and Fittings. 

EDWARDS, W. H., Melbourne. 

2094 Butter Moulder. 

GOBY & JAUBERT, 110 Lonsdale-street East, Melbourne. 

2095 Revolving Freezing Machine. 

GODFREY, RICHARD, Etna Foundry, Franklin-street, Melbourne. 
2095a Balcony Panels, Gate Pier, Column and Frieze. 

GREEN, RICHARD, Sydney, New South Wales. 

2096 Willow Cradle. 

2097 Linen Basket 

2098 Perambulator. 

2099 Basketware. 

HIGGINS, JOSEPH FIELDING, 39 Little CoUins-street West, 

Melbourne. 

2100 Patent Disinfecting Closets. 

2101 Patent Disinfecting Commodes. 

HOLT, JOHN GREENWOOD, 19 Argyle-place, Lygon-street, 

Carlton. 

2102 Earthenware Water Filters, Nos. 2, 3, 4 and 5 gallons. 

JONES, MISS A. A., 41 Franklin-street, West Melbourne. 

2103 Pair of Paper Mats for holding vases, beehive shape. 

LANDE, W. J., & CO., 28 CoUins^treet West, Melbourne. 

2104 Improved Patent Domestic Washing and Wringing Machine. 

MCLEAN BROS. & RIGG, Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

(Non*competitive.) 

2105 Machine for Drawing Corks (in use at the refreshment bar). A 

simple movement of a lever pierces the cork, removes it 
from the bottle, and throws it away. 

MOTJRANT, J. T., 77 Great Oxford-street, CoUingwood. 

2106 Wood Taps, &c. 

PORTA, JOSEPH, 146 Little Lonsdale-street East, Melbourne. 

2107 House Bellows. 

2108 Fancy Bellows. 

2109 Blacksmith's Bellows. 

2110 Double-action Bellows. 

2111 Portable Forge. 



140 CATALOGUE OF THE 

PENAL ESTABLISHMENTS, INSPBCTOR-GENERIL OF, 

King-street^ Melbourne. 

2112 Coir Mat 

2113 Coir Chain Mat 

2114 Coir Mat, woollen border. 

2115 Fancy Mats. 

. 2116 Coir Matting. 

2117 Cabbagetree Mats. 

2118 Garden Seats. 

2119 Umbrella Stand. 

2120 Door Scraper. 

2121 Skates^ English pattern* 

ROBINSON, CHARLES J., Elizabeth-street West, Melbourne. 

2122 Champion Washing Machine. 

ROWDEN BROTHERS, Manufacturers, 74 Little CoUinsHBtreet, 

Melbourne. 

2123 Gralvanised Iron Buckets. 

2124 Galyanised Iron Tubs. 

2125 Galyanised Iron Baths. 

2126 Toilet and General Tinware. 

SHAW, ALFRED, & CO., 13 LitUe Collins-street West, Melbourne. 

2130 Millet Brooms. 

2131 Millet Whisks. 

SHAW, M^NAUGHTON & CO., Franklin-street, West Melbourne. 

2132 Stamped Milk Dishes. 

2133 Stamped Frying Pans. 

STONE & ROBOTTOM, 120 Flinders-lane East, Melbourne. 

2134 Fancy Household and Machine Brushware. 

TOPPING, JOHN, 44 PostK)ffice Place, Melbourne. 

2135 Patent Water Closet for Victorian Railways, &c. 

TURNBULL, THOMAS, Bridge-road and Fyfe-street, Richmond, 

2136 Chums. 

2137 Trucks of various sizes. 

VICTORIA ICE COMPANY, Limited, 60 Collins-street West, 
Melbourne. (C. W. Umphelby, Secretary). 

2138 Ice Chest, « The Victoria." 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. ^^^ 

WIEGMANN, AUGUST, 45 Post-office Place, Melbourne. 

2139 Basketware Cradles. 

2140 fiasketware Perambulators. 

2141 Basketware Chairs. 

2142 Basketware Flower Stands. 

2143 Baskets. 

WHITNEY, CHAMBERS & CO., Swanston-street, Melbourne. 

2144 Chambers' Patent Eureka Family Washing Machine. 

2145 Patent Wringers for the same. 

ZEVENBOOM, JOHN, 12 VBeckettrstreet, Melbourne. 

2146 Brushware. 

ZEVENBOOM, WYNAND, 17 Little Lonsdale-street West, 

Melbourne. 

2147 Brushware. 



Group 39. 



ANDRESEN, L. C, 35 Market-street, Melbourne. 

2148 Waterglass. 

2149 Waterglass Preparation for Building Purposes. 

ATYEO, FREDERICK, Lytton-street, Carlton, Melbourne. 

2150 Clock Stand in Colonial Stone and Marble. 

2151 Ornament in Colonial Stone. 

BLIGHT, CHARLES, 208 Russell-street, Melbourne. 

2152 Brackets : Composition Ornaments. 

2153 Brackets: Gold and Silver Gilt. 

2154 Brackets: all Gold. 

2155 Brackets : Composition Shell, all Gold. 

CARR & SONS, 128 Spring-street, Melbourne. 

2156 Inside Venetian Blind, with check action. 

2157 Wire Blind. 

2158 Spanish and Florentine Blinds. • 

2159 Spring Roller Blind. 

2160 Dwarf Blind. 

2161 Skylight Blind. 

2162 Outside Venetian Shutters. 

2163 Carr's Registered Hinges for festening the same. 



142 CATAIiOOUE OF THE 

CHAMBERS & GLUTTBN^ Lonadale-str^e^ East^ Ifelboume. 

2164 Marble Chimney Piece and Fenders, mairafactured in Melbourne 

from Italian marble. 

2165 Marble Slabs from Tarrabandra Marble QliarrieS; New South 

Wales. 

DAVIS, JAMES, Avon Cottages, Lennox-street, North Richmond. 

2166 Davis' Patent Improved Method of Hanging Sashes, capable of 

being instantly reversed for cleaning, ventilating, or re- 
pairing. 

DICKIE, CHARLES, Little Lonsdale-street, Melbourne. 

2167 Wire-work Aviarv. 

DOUGLAS & CAMERON, 158 Little FUnders-street East, 

Melbourne. 

2168 Polished Marble Mantelpiece. 

2169 Marble Fender. 

DOWLING, WILLI M , Plasterer, 101 Montague-street, 

Emerald Hill. 

2170 Centre Flowers. 

2171 Trusses. 

DUNCKLEY & M'BRIDE, 28 A'Beckett-street East, Melbourne. 

2172 Sash Lines. 

2173 Clock Gut. 

2174 Whip Gut 

2175 Gut Lathe Bands. 

(Manufactured on the banks of the Saltwater River.) 

FODEN, THOMAS, Sandridge-road, near Princes Bridge, Melbourne. 

2176 Marble Mantelpiece. 

GREER & ASHBURNER, 38 Little Collins-street East, 

Melbourne. 

2177 Wire Cloth. 

2178 Wire Work (general). 

HODGSON BROS., View-place, Sandhurst 

2179 Patent Self- Acting Venetian Blind. 

2180 Spring Roller Blind. 

The special feature in this exhibit is the new and improved 
method of painting the Venetian Blind, it being superior 
and more lasting tjian the usual method of treating the 
mineral green used for painting. 



INTERCOLONIAL SXHIBITIOK, 1875. 143 

HUXLEY, PARKER & CO., Russell-street, Melbourne. 
2181 Mantelpiece. of V^ed Marble, with Ckdumns of Queensland 

Marble. 
218S Grey Granite Polisbed Mantelpij&ce, 
3183 Statuary Marble Mantelpieces. 

(Non-competitive.) 

2184 Sienna Marble Mantelpieces, with Columns, the spandrils 

richly carved and polished. 

LLOYD & SON, 2 Bond-street, Melbourne. 

2185 Venetian Blinds, in cases. 

MARRIOTT, JAMES, 116 Lonsdale-street East. 

2185a Carved Frieze and Bracket, carved in clear pine, for ornamental 
cast-iron verandahs. 

M^EWAN, JAMES, A CO., 81 Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

2186 Marble Mantelpieces. 

MURPHY, EDWARD, Sandridge-road, Melbourne. 

2187 Patent Ceiling Ventilator, with centre flower attached. 

NORRIS, D., 11 Lonsdale-street East, Melbourne. 

2188 Grained Imitation of Woods. 

OAKEY, WILMOT, 4 Breadalbane-terrace, Berkeley-street, Carlton. 

2189 Oakey's Patent Ventilating Window Fastener. 

PEPPER, GEORGE, 169 Chapel-street, Windsor. 

2190 Plaster Models. 

2191 Ceiling and Wall Patent Ventilators. 

PROCTOR & HILL, High-street, St Kilda. 

2192 Wilson's Patent Ventilators, for ventilating rooms. 

ROCKE, W. H., & CO., Collins-street East, Melbourne. 

2193 Handsome Colonial-made White- Vein Mantelpiece, manufactured 

at the Foden Steam Marble Works, Sandridge-road. 

TRAIN & CO., Moray-street and Sandridge-road, Emerald Hill. 

2194 Enamelled Slate Mantelpiece. 

2195 Enamelled Slate Mantelpiece. 

WELCH, HENRY P., & CO., 172 Queen-street, Melbourne. 

(Non-competitive). 

2196 Metallic Venetian Blinds (imported). 

2197 Steel Revolving Shutters (Clark and Co.'s, London), with noise 

less motion. 

WILSON, CORBEN & CO., Lonsdale-street East, Melbourne. 

2198 Enamelled Mantelpieces. 



144 CATALOGUE OF THB 

DEPARTMENT 16. 

GAS, COKE, APPARATUS FOR LIGHTING AND 

COOKING, HARDWARE, &c. 



EXPERTS. 



A. Dempster, Esq. 

Johnson Hicks, Ksq* 

R. S. Inglis, M.P., Chairman. 



Bobt. M'Don^, Esq. 
J. S. Pnryes, Esq. 



Thomas Roberta, Esq. 
CoL B. W. Ward, R.E. 



GASWORKS. 

There are in Victoria 14 Gasworks, five of which employ steam-power 
and 330 hands. The aggregate value of the plant and machinery nsed 
is X484,611; of the land upon which the works are erected £10,617; 
and of the buildings, XI 10,232. The approximate value of the produce 
of the works in 1874 was X237,826. The largest works employ 156 
hands — 150 men and 6 boys, who work eight hours per day, earning — 
stokers, 9s.; labourers, 6s.; mechanics, 10s. per day, and boys 15s. to 20b. per 
per week. The wholesale value of the manufactures produced therein in 
1874wasX92,783 13s.3d.,being£76,90714s.6d.forgas; X13,22016s.lld. 
for coke, and X2655 Is. lOd. for tar. A second gasworks employs 9 men, 
who, working 9 hours per day, earn £2 14s. per week. The wholesale 
value of the manufactures in 1874 was X17,S65 10s. 3d., being £13,407 
19s. 6d. for gas, and £957 Hs. 9d. for coke and coal tar. A third 
employs 7 hands — 5 men and 2 boys, who earn — ^the former £2 lOs. per 
week, and the latter 17s. 6d. The wholesale value of the manufactm-es 
produced in 1874 was £3090 14s. lid., being £2797 38. 7d. for gas; 
£192 4s. 9d. for gas-fittings, and £101 6s. 7d. for coke and tar. 

A foundry, the chief business of which is the manufacture of Chande- 
liers, employs 35 hands — 15 men and 20 boys, the former of whom earn 
lis. per day and the latter 2s. 6d. per day. During the year 1874 the 
wholesale value of the articles manufeu^tured amounted to £6600. 

Ketums have been received by the Commissioners from two factoriea 
at which Colonial Ovens, Ranges, Gas Stoves and Cooking Stoves are manu- 
factured. One employing 13 hands — 6 men and 7 bojrs, turned out in 
the year 1874 work to the value of £6000. The working hours are 8 
per diem, and the earnings are — ^men, £2 10s., and boys 12s. per week. 
The other employs 18 hands — 11 men and 7 boys, who work 9 hours per 
day and earn £2 10s. per week for men, and 14s. for boys. The whole- 
sale value of the goods made in 1874 was £4700. 

The trade as regards Pliunbers' Hardware is extensive. The two 
spouting manufactories from which returns have been received employ 
12 hands, and the wholesale value of the manufactures produced in 1874 
amoimted to £19,000. 

In Tin and Sheet Iron the largest manufacturer who has sent returns 
to the Conmiissioners puts down the wholesale value of the work turned 
out by him in 1874 at £9000. He employs 32 hands, who work 10 
hours per day, the amount paid in wages being about £50 jier week. 



INTERCOLONIAL feX^filTION, 1875. ' 1*^^ 

The demand for Ck>loiiial-infid4 Bolts and Nuts » fast inereaailig, due 
almost entirely to the admirable quality of the articles turned out by the 
YictOTian manufkoturers. The largest of thes^ gives emplo3rment to 17 
hands — 10 men and 7 boys — ^who work 8 hours per day, andeam-^the 
former £2 8s. per week, and the latter 15s. 9d. The wholesale value of 
the manufactures produced in 1874 amounted to £5200 for 150 tons. 



Group 40. 

ANDRESEN, L. C, 35 Market street, Melbourne. 

2199 Apparatus for the manufacture of Gas from the New South 
Wales shale oil^ without the application of fire; it produces 
a brig^ht brilliant light, at a cost of about four to fiye shil- 
lings per thousand cubic feet. 

BOTHWELL, JAMES, 15 Alfred-street, Emerald Hill, Melbourne. 

2201 Scoop Carriage, for charging gas retorts and other analagous 

purposes. 

DANKS, JOHN, 42 Bourkenstreet West, Melbourne. 

2202 Improved Refleetors for gas and korosene. 

DOUGLAS & CAMERON, 108 Flinders-lane East, Melbourne. 

2208 Gasaliers, Eerolier, Hall Lamps, Large Pillars and Globes, 
Gothic Church da, Corona, Scrapers, Firedogs, Brackets, 
Ornaments, Shades, and Frames. 

BOWLING, WILLIAM, 101 Montague-street, Snerald Hill. 

2204 Patent Metal Ventilators. 

DUNCAN & ERASER, Franklin-street, Adelaide, South Australia. 

2205 American Tire Setter. 

HENKEL & PATERSON, 80 Little Collins-street, Melbourne. 

2208 Railway Lamps. 

2209 Ship Lamps. 

2210 Carriage Lamps. 



146 CATALOGUE OF THE 

HILL, WILLIAM; Highworth Villa, Jefibott-street, West Melbourne. 

2211 Model of Chimney Top, and Plan showing Section of same called 

'' Fumopellenter, or Smoke Dispeller." 

HODGSON & CO., 154 and 166 Smith-street, Oollingwood. 

2212 Oas Cooking Stoves. 

2213 Oas Stove for Office. 

2214 Nursery Fenders. 

2215 Sieves. 

2216 Cages. 

2217 Wire Arch, for garden walk. 

HUTCHINSON, WILLIAM, Post-office Place, Melbourne. 

2218 Patent Ovens. 

2219 . Patent Boiler Stands, &c. 

JEANS, SAMUEL ENGLAND, High-street, St Kilda. 

2220 Jeans' Cheerful Gkts Stoves, for heating offices or bedrooms. 

2221 Registered Atmospheric Gas Stoves, for heating tailors' or 

laundry irons. 

2222 Patent Reflector Gas Cooking Stoves^ heated without gas on 

the oven. 

2223 Patent Reflector Gas Cooking Apparatus, with hot-water 

boiler and griUer. 

M'EWAN, JAMES, & CO., 81 Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

2226 Kitchen Range. 
222? Gasaliers. 

M'LEAN BROTHERS & RIGG, Melbourne. 

2228 Gas Apparatus, for making gas from petroleum spirit; simple in 

management, and e£Eective. 

2229 Gasalier Burners. 

2330 Lamps for Street, colonial-made. Great improvement in distri- 
bution of light; can be lit or extinguished from the street 
(without using a ladder) by a torch provided for the pur- 
pose. 

MURPHY, EDWARD, Sandridge-road, near Toll-gate, Emerald Hill. 

S230a Murphy's Registered Ornamental Chimney Cap, for the preven- 
tion of smoky chimneys. 
2S30b Plaster Model of Chimney Cap, under glass shade. 



VKEEFE, EDWARD, Abboi^&fd. 
2231 OEeefr s Pktoit Gas MiduM. 

PABKBB Jb CO., 43 Ptet-oflke Pke^> MelbowrMy ud Bwwood^ 

road, Hawtliortt« 



2233 (ftjoBpioii Orais. 

2234 YaditStofe 

2235 Clialkiige StoTos. 

2236 Gas StoTes. 

PRINCE, JAMES, Victoria-parade, Melbouraa. 

2237 Kerosene Lamp, Sibley's patent, \ /NQn^oomnetitive ^ 

2238 KcroseneCookmgApparatus,SiWe/8patent / C^ou^^ompeUUveO 

RALEIGH, MICHAEL, 6 Sydney-ierraoe, Canning-atreet, Carlton, 

2239 New Patent Improved Colonial Oven. 

2240 Raleigh's Patent Colonial Oven, set in brickwork. 

2241 Plan of Raleigh's Patent Double Oven, for bread and biaouit 

baking, heats two chambers with one furnace, aavea 60 per 
cent of fuel, and allows the baking to be carried on without 
intermission, and consumes tlie smoke. 

RIDDELL, JAMES S., 120 Russell-street, Melbourne, 

2242 Gas Bath, new invention. 
2241a Reflectors for Gas and Kerosene. 
2242b Reflecting Lamps for Gas and Kerosene. 

SELLE, C. H., 102 Canning-street, Carlton. 

2243 Pewter Work. 

2244 Candle Moulds for stearine, tallow, parafinC; or compo«iti(in 

candles. 
2246 Block-tin Taps, specialty for their noncorroding valfs (no 
verdegris), first made in the colony. 

2246 Syphon Taps, for soda water. 

2247 Syphon Bottles, and other Pewter Work 

2248 Hand-frame for making Tallow Candles. 

WALKER, A. R., 40 Latrobe-street Weat, Melbourne. 

2249 Gas Cooking Stoves. 

2250 Colonial Ovens. 

WALLACE, W., 68 Moraywrtreet^ Emerald Hill 

2251 Tnnspaient Lamp Shades, with fi^'u/e« and hudac^fm cut with 



WALLIS, F^ A SONS, WelJingWn-*u^, CoUin^or^, 

2252 Gas Stores. 

2253 ColcmiaJ Ovens. 

L t 



148 CATALOGUE OP THE 

WHITNEY, CHAMBERS & CO., Swanston-street, Melbourne. 

(Non-competitive.) 

2254 Stead s Patent Ventilator. 

2255 Improved Paragon Kitoliener, with two wrought roasters or 

ovens, with bright ornamental tables in front, wrought hot 
closet, wrought arch flue; high pressure boot boiler, capable 
of supplying hot water to bath. Kitchen, scullery, &c.; plate 
rack nxed in brickwork; skirting, double roasting pan, with 
meat stand; game rack, with nooks; ash pans, &c. Can 
be made any size, with or without grilling stove and hot 
closet. 

2256 Improved Domestic Paragon Kitchener, with cast side boiler, 

wrought oven (for use in roasting at will), with bright 
ornamental table under it, covings, bright plate rack, ash 
pan, roasung pans, meat stimd, fire briisks, dbc. 



Group 41. 

BROWNING, GEORGE, 16 Therry-street, Melbourne. 

2257 LoUie Tins, with printed glasses. 

2258 Preserved Meat Tins, printed. 

2259 Jam Tins, printed. 

(Manufactured in Melbourne.) 

HARKER, JOHN, Spencer-atreet, Melbourne. 

2260 Bolts and Nuts. 

HILL, JAMES, 201 Bourke-street West, Melbourne. 

2261 Church Bells. 

2262 Ship Bells. 

2263 School Bells. 

2264 Horse Bells. 

2265 Bullock Bells. 

HUGHES & HARVEY, 144 Lonsdale-street East, Melbourne. 

2266 Ornamental Coffee and Spice Box, with invoice holder, 
226? Ornamental Coffee Box, with embossed glass front. 

2268 Tobacco Box, on spindle, for counter use, in pearl and gold. 

2269 Octagon Syrup Case. Subject — " You can't bite now.'* 

2270 Octagon Syrup Case. Subject — Young Romula, in pearl. 

2271 Set of six Sexagon Canisters. 

2272 Set of three Round Canisters. Subject — Spring, Summer and 

Autumn. 

2273 Set of three Round Canisters. Subject — Mandarin figures. 

2274 Sets Grocer's Showstands. 

2275 Set of four Grocer's Showbowls. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. ^^^ 

2276 Twine-holders. 

2277 Ornamental Grocer's Canisters. 

2278 Set Maple Foot Baths, Pail, and Water Can. 

2279 Set Water Lily „ „ „ „ 

2280 Set Hip Bath, Water Can, Slop PaiL 

2281 Jugs and Basins. 

2282 Hot Water Cans, japanned. 

2283 Ladies' Bonnet Boxes. 

2284 Sets Deed Boxes. 

2285 Hexagon Hotel Lamp. 
w286 Hot Water Cans, in brass. 

2287 Copper Tea Urn. 

2288 Patent Cart Can, to prevent milk churning in hot weather. 

2289 Pair Cart Cans. 

2290 Atmospheric Churns, for family use. 

2291 Improved Milking Bucket, with strainer attached. 

2292 Set of Measures and Strainer, 

2293 Round Self-acting Buckets, as used on Stations. 

2294 Square Self-^acting Buckets, as used on Stations. 

2295 Perforated Iron Wool-washing Tub. 

2296 One-length Sheep Trovghing. 

2297 Set Iron Buckets. 

2298 Set Round Washing Tubs. 

2299 Set Oval Washing IHibs. 

2300 Cheese Rim for factory use. 

2301 Brass Stencil Plates. 

2302 Copper Stencil Plates. 

2303 Improved Copper Washing Boiler, with galvanised iron frame 

and pipe to stand outside. 

HUTCHINSON, WILLIAM, Post-office Place, Melbourne. 

2304 Ornamental Iron Castings. 

2305 Register Grates. 

KELLY, JOHN R, 277 Smith-street, Fitzroy. 

2306 Horse Shoes (polished). 

M'lLWRAITH, JOHN, Little Collins-street East, Melbourne. 

2307 Sheet Lead, rolled. 

2308 Lead Pipes, hvdraulic pressed. 

2309 Composition 6as Pipes, hvdraulic pressed. 

2310 Block-tin Tubes, hydraulic pressed, the first manufactured in 

the colony. 

PATTON, EMILY SOPHIA, Punt^road, Richmond. 

2311 Ornamental Cast-iron Crosses and Tablets, for Memorials for 

Graves, from registered designs by Emily Sophia Patton, 
manufactured by Thomas N. Tarver, Ironfounder, Nott- 
street, Sandridge. 




150 CATALOGUE OF THE 

RENARD BROS. & CO., 11 and 12 William-street, Market 
Buildings, Melbourne. (Non-competitive). 

2312 Walnut Wood Blocks, fitted with Yale-locks. 

2313 Model of Gate Fixture. 

2314 Model of Post Office Boxes. 

2315 Samples of Locks. 

2316 Ornamental Bronze Fixtures, &c. 

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN COMMISSION, Adelaide, South Australia. 
231? Colonial Iron Castings. 



DEPARTMENT 16. 
PAPER AND CARDBOARD. 



Baron F. VonMueUer, C.M.G. 



EXPERTS. 
J. Cosmo Newbery, Esq., 



J. M'Cutcheon, Esq. Chairman. R. H. Thatcher, Esq 



Alfred Shaw, Esq. 



The owner of the only Paper-mill who has as yet started paper- 
making on a large scale in Victoria, employs first-class machinery, and 
occupies buildings valued in the Government returns at £31,000. In 
this paper-mill the material manufactured is the ordinary sort of 
printing paper used for newspapers, &c., and also the rougher kinds, of 
which paperbags and common wrappings are made. The mill produced during 
the year ending December, 1874, paper to the value of £35,000, and 
gives employment to fifty men, fifty women, and twelve young persons. 
Wages for men may be placed at £3 per weeky women 16s., and young 
persons 10s. 

Out of the five Paperbag factories in Victoria, only one has given 
such information to the Commissioners as can enable them to make a 
guess at the value of this industry, and the manufacturer — ^with seven 
men, five women, and four young persons — ^has, in a year, turned out 
£3500 worth of goods. He pays his men £2 10s. per week, women 
18s., and young persons 10s. The hours of labour are nine. 

Besides the paper factory and paperbag works already mentioned, 
there are sixteen Account-book and General Stationery manufactories, 
where 446 males and 146 females are at work. The ground upon 
which these factories are built is valued at £19,550, and the worth of 
the plants is estimated at £85,126. The value of the buildings is set 
down at £35,500. 

Another industry in which the coaraer sorts of paper play a 
prominent part is Paperbox-making, and one factory — employing 15 
hands, viz., 3 men, 3 women, and 9 young persons — ^tiuned out, 
during 1874, goods to the wholesale value of £1800. The rate 



IKTERGOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 875. 151 

of wages is — ^men £2 per week, women £1 2s. 6d., and young 
penBODS 10s. 

A large amount of information as to Yictorian products suitable for 
paper-making, and about plants not indigenous which might be grown 
here with t£at object, has been compiled by Baron Yon Mueller, and 
published with the records of former Exhibitions. 



Group 42. 

DIRECTOR OF BOTANIC GARDENS, Melbourne. 

Paper made from Bark of — 

2318 Broussonetia papyrifera (Paper Mulberry Tree). 

2319 Salvia Canariensis. 

2320 Dais continifolia. 

2321 Eucalyptus obliqua (Stringybark). 

2322 jy fissilis (Messmate). 

2323 Abutilon mollis (Soft-leaved Abutilon). 

2324 ,, venosum (Veined Lantern flower). 

2325 Pimelia axiflora (Currijong). 

2326 Commersonia Fraseri, (Queensland Lye Plant). 

2327 Pittosporum crassifolium (Thick-leaved Pittosporum). 

2328 Pipturus propinquus (Queensland Grasscloth Plant). 

2329 Melaleuca ericifolia (Common Tea IVee). 

2330 yy genistifolia (Broom-leaved Tea Tree). 

2331 Sterculia diversifolia (Victorian Bottle Tree). 

2332 „ acerifolia (Flame Tree). 

2333 Boehmeria nivea (Chinese Grasscloth Plants 

2334 Sida pulchella (Victorian Hemp). 

2335 ^, retusa (Queensland Hemp). 

2336 Melaleuca squarrosa (Victorian x ellow-wood). 
Paper made from Stems of — 

2337 Urtica incisa (Victorian Nettle). 

2338 Ehrharta tenacissima. 

2339 Garex appressa. 

2340 ,y pseudo-cyperus. 

2341 Isolepeis nodosa. 

2342 Juncus pauciflorus (Few-flowered Bush). 
Paper made from Stems and Leaves ok — 

2343 Gahnia psittacorum^ var. ervthrocarpum. 

2344 Lepidosperma elatius (Tall Sword Rush). 

2345 CordyUne indivisa (Tall Pahn Lilv). 

2346 Phormium tenax (New Zealand Flax). 

2347 Gynerium argenteum (Pampas Grass). 

2348 Arundo conspicua (Plume Grass). 

2349 Fourcroya gigantea (Giant Lily). 

2350 Gyperus sp. 

2351 Juncus maritimus (Coast fiush). 

2352 yy vaginatus (Small Sheathed Rush). 



192 CATALOGUE OF TH£ 

2353 Juncus vaginattis (large Sheathed Rush! 

S354 Lepidosperma gladiatum (Coast Sword Kush). 

2355 Typha anfpistifolia (Native Bulrush). 

2356 Scirpus fluyiatilis. 

2357 Marica Northiana. 

2358 Xerotes longifolia (Native Tussock Grass.) 

2359 Pandanus utilis (Screw Pine). 

2360 Gyperus lucidus. 

2361 Gonferva sp. (Swamp Moss). 

2362 DianeUa latifolia. 

2363 Garyota urens (Jaggery Palm.) 

RAMSDEN, SAMUEL, Princes Bridge, Melbourne. 

2364 Imperial White Cartridge Paper. 

2365 Printing Paper. 

2366 Printing News Paper. 

2367 Colom-ed Printing, viz., yellow, mauve, light blue, dark blue, 

magenta, pink, etc. 

2368 Bookbinders' Pressings. 

2369 Tea Cartridge. 

2370 Tea Paper. 

2371 Coffee Paper. 

2372 Sugar Paper (Grey Royal Hand). 

2373 Brown Wrapping. 

2374 Thin Brown. 

2375 Extra Strong Thin Cap. 

2376 Thin Grey. 

2377 Grey Casing, made entirely from New Zealand Grass. 

2378 Grey Casing, made entirely from Victorian Grass. 

2379 Brown Wrapping, made entirely from Victorian Grass. 



DEPARTMENT 17. 

MISCELLANEOUS HAND-TOOLS, MACHINES, 
AND APPARATUS OF AGRICULTURE, 
MINING, EXTRACTIVE ARTS, ELECTRO- 
PLATING AND EMBOSSING, &c. 



J. P. Atkinson, Esq. 
C. F. Creswell, Esq. 
William Elsdon, Esq. 
Robert Fulton, Esq. 



EXPERTS. 

Joel Horwood, Esq. 
Abraham Lincolne, Esq. 
Alfred May, Esq. 
Josiah Mitchell, Esq. 



George Moore, Esq. 
Kobert M'DoogaU, Esq. 
A. K. Smith, Esq., 
Chairman. 



The manufactures included under the above heading are — ^if the term 
may be used here — quite of a cosmopolitan nature. Now-ardays almost 
everytliing that goes upon the markets passes through machinery of 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 1^3 

some.sorty aad the only honour reflected upoji machipe wprk belongs to 
the inventor of the engine, the workman who works it, the smiths who 
make, and the country that exports it most largely. For a mining 
country like Australia, where, thousands of men, brought up to all kinds 
of trades and professions, have learned by practical experience the 
dif&culties that present themselves to diggers and reefers, it stands to 
i^eason that our engineers and machinists have, with the encouragement 
before them, not been slow to supply the deficiencies in machineiy that 
have been pointed out to them by practical men. The same may be 
said of our agricultural implement makers. Visitors to the Exhibition 
wiU have the opportunity afforded them of viewing the latest mechani- 
cal appliances. Many of these are imported articles: but there are also 
exhi^ts nmnufactored by our colonidl machinists, engineei^, cutlers, 
metal-fittei^, founders, tc^l-makers and other artis^ms Engaged in pro! 
ducing a labour-saving appliance, and the several parts of which it is 
made. 

To begin with Sewing Machines, it may at once be said that there is 
in Victoria no factory devoted to their production, though they can be 
repaired, put together, and supplied with novel appurtenances as 
quickly, and nearly as cheaply, here as in the countries where they ai'e 
made. 

Quartz-crushing, Stamping, Boring, Rockdrilling, and other machijiery, 
used by miners, is made here to a large extent and of an excellent 
quality, and can be bought at a price little above that of the imported 
article. 

Chaffcutting, Mowing; Heaping, Grain-Crushing, Winnowing, Stripping, 
Binding, Thr^hing, and in a word, every kind of agricultural machine or 
implement, from a full power steam-threshing machine to a garden rake, 
can be made— and is made — ^largely in our workshops. The ironwork 
and steel wrought here from imported metal is said by experienced 
persons to be tougher and more durable than that import^ in the form 
of roller^, cogwheels, straw-cutting blades, <kc. 

There are in the colony 44 agricultural implement makers, nearly 
half of whom use steam-power in their factories. The whole of the 
factories give employment to 670 workpeople, and an idea of the value 
of the goods may be guessed at when it is stated that 14 of the 
factory owners have sent returns to the Ck>mmissioners, giving as the 
i^esult of their industry during the year 1874 the handsome simi of 
£88,157. One Ballarat firm tamed out during the same year mining 
and agricoltural implements to the value of £5000. 

Those engaged in the extractive arts, such as distillei^s, assayers, 
chemists, and workers in precious metals, need not search beyond 
Melbourne for their Stills, Betorts, Crucibles, and othertools of trade, as all 
these can be made to order in the city at a reasonable price. The 
manufacture ci woollen goods has only recently become an Australian 
industry, consequently there has been no demand as yet upon our local 
engineers for spinning and weaving apparatus, as the mills in present 
work were, when first erected, provided with imported appliances ci all 
sorts. As the demand for colonial-made tweeds grows, of course the 
number of mills will increa.se, and then it will be found that all the 



154 CATALOGUE OF THE 

fittingB required in weaving-mills can be made by colonial engineers, 
almost as quickly as the mills can be built. 

Electro-plating is not by any means an unknown art in Australia, but 
the artists who rely upon this particular branch of trade as a means of 
obtaining a decent living, get that and little more. While writing of 
this particular branch of trade, Die-sinking naturally suggests itself to 
the mind, for without stamped forms in copper or amaJgamated metal, 
there would be nothing to coat with gold and silver. Engravers, Die- 
cutters, and Modellers are plentiful enough in Australia, and many of our 
Jewellers and Silversmiths manufacture magnificent articles in gold and 
silver. The only electro-plating manufactory from which the Commis- 
sioners have a return employs 12 hands — 7 men and 5 boys. The whole- 
sale value of the manufactures produced in 1874 (chiefly for volimteer 
uniforms) amounted to £2000. The same factory turns out annually a 
large quantity of engraved and stamped work in the shape of medals, 
seals, buttons, &c. 

Printing-presses and Machines have been made, but up to the present 
not to any large extent. 



Group 43. 

STENBECK, C. G., 24 Cardigan-street, Carlton. 

2380 Machine for Cutting and Punching Holes in Lace-up Boots, 

made by T. Fettling, 1 Little Bourke-street. 

SMART, J. J., Kirk's Bazaar, Melbourne. 
2380a Patent Labels for Registering Sheep, Cattle, and Horses. 

WHITFIELD, JOSEPH, 8 Post-office Place, Melbourne. 

2381 Cutlery made in Melbourne. 



Group 44. 

BODINGTON, ROBERT, 4 Queensberry-street, Carlton. 

2389 Sharp's Patent Sheep Support on Rollers, used in the washing 

of sheep by spouts or jets. 

BRISCOE & CO., 11 Collins-street East, Melbourne. 

(Non-competitive. ) 

2390 Forks — Hay, Manure, Digging, Spading, Potatoes, and Sluice. 
&391 Garden Rakes and Hoes. 

2392 Hoe Rakes. 

2397 Shovels. 

2398 Spades. 

2399 Picks. 



INTEBCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 155 



BUNGLE, JOHN, Parkside Iron Works, Hotham. 

2400 Chicory-cutting Machine, latest improved (manufactured by 

euiibitor). 

2401 Single-pair Com Crusher, for general use. 

2402 Tobacco-cutting Machine. Colonial manufacturers are now 

enabled by the aid of these machines to produce an article 
that will bear critical comparison with the best imported 
American. 

2403 Three-knife Chaffcntter, for use by wholesale storekeepers, 

capable of cutting 85 tons with steam-power, and 20 tons 
per week with horse-power. 

2404 Chaff and Tailings Elevator, in connection with Chaffcutting 

Machine. The canvas elevator will take the chaff to any 
distance from under the sieve, while the box elevator re- 
ceives the tailings and returns them to the feed box. 
2406 Three-knife Chaffcutter, with Sieve Gear, for use by retail store- 
keepers. Will cut 14 cwt per hour with the aid of steam- 
power. 

2406 Two-Knife Chaffcutter, to be driven by steam, horse, or hand power. 

2407 Two-kniie Chaffcutter, for hand-power only. 

2408 Two-knife Chaffcutter, light and useful for general purposes. 

2409 Com Crusher. This machine, with different rollers supplied by 

the maker, will crush maize, oats, or malt. 

2410 Single-pair KoUer Crusher, for maize, beans, oats, wheat, and malt. 



GROOM, BENJAMIN, Edward-street, Branswick. 
2412 Tobacco Cutting Machines, new patent. 

HENDERSON, THOS., & CO., 89 Elizabeth-street North, 

Melbourne. 

2415 Working Model of Exhibitors' Double Furrow Plough, with 
improved governor steerage, made by William Hay. 

HYNE, HENRY, St. Hubert's, near Lillydale. 

2417 Plans for an Improved Scirew Wine Press, in two glazed 

picture frames. 

JOHNS, PETER^ 84 Minders-lane East, Melbourne. 

2418 Pearce's Patent Bark Mill, Improvements in Machinery for 

breaking Bark, Wood, Earths, Minerals, or Grains, 
motion, worked by horse-power. 



156 CATALOGUE OF THE 

KEARTON, CHRISTOPHER, Bailey-street, Clunes. 

2419 Improved Machine for making all kinds of Sausage goods. 

LANDE, W. J., & CO., 28 CoUins-street West, Melbourne. 
2419a Patent Compound Lever Wool Press. 

LENNON, HUGH, Elizabetfi-street North, Melbourne. 

2420 Set 3-horse Swingletrees (Dynamometrical), for registering the 

draught of agricultural machinery when in motion. 

2421 Two-wheel Reaping and Mowing Machine (patent). 

2422 New Revolving Harrows. 

2423 Four-wheeled Jointed Bar Reaping and Mowing Machine, double 

9peed. 

2424 Large Drain Plough, for station work. 

2425 Roadmaker's Plough, large. 

2426 Plough for breaking up virgin soil. 

2427 Two-horse Double-wheel Plough. 

2428 Two-horse One-wheel or Swing Plough. 

2429 One-horse Plough. 

2430 Small Vineyard Plough. 

2431 Plough Forgings, from Victorian scrap iron. 

2432 Plough Castings, made from Tasmanian iron. 
2432a Excefcior Double Furrrow Plough. 

LUGTON, ALEXANDER, & SONS, 144 Little Lonsdale-street 

East, Melbourne. 

2433 Sausage Machine, worked by hand or steam power. 

2434 Sausage-filling Machine, with wrought iron spindle and gun- 

metal rack. 

MCLEAN BROTHERS & RIGG, 69 Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

2435 Wire Fence, colonial-made, for sheep, showing compaiiBon 

between the patent oval Samson wire and the old sort, the 
advantage being great strength and lightness. 

2436 Patent Sheep Shear Cramp. 

MOORE & CO., 10^ Bourke-street, Melbourne. 

2437 Smut Machine. 

MUNRO, DAVID, & CO., 154 Queen-street, Melbourne. 

2439 Complete Threshing Plant, consisting of engine, thresher, and 
elevators, all complete. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1B75. 167 

ROBINSON, T., & CO., 247 Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

2440 Combined Treble-blast Steam Threshing, Riddling*, Straw- 

shaking, Winnowing, Barley, Awning, and Final Dressing 
Machine, with 5 feet patent drum, by T. Robinson and 
Co. This machine will thresh and thoroughly dress wheat, 
barley, oats, or rye without injury to the grain. 

2441 Horse-power Threshing and Cleaning Machine, with peg drum, 

fitted with riddles, elevators, and mounted on travelling 

wheels. 

« 

2442 Pair Horse Peff-drum Thresher and Separator, specially adapted 

for small mrms. 

2443 Stripping Machine for Harvesting, to gather wheat, oats, barley, 

and grass-seed. Will gather from 8 to 10 acres per day. 

2444 Speedy's Patent Wool, Cotton, and Hop Press, worked by 

windlass and rope, equally adapted for large or small flock- 
owners. 

2446 Double Furrow Plough, with patent T bodies, steel mould- 
boards and wrought iron shares. 

2446 Earth Scoop, for making dams, levelling land, making roads^ 

&c., self-fiUitfg and discharging, wonted by four horses or 
bullocks. 

2447 Horse Hay Rake, with improved lever, wrought-iron frame and 

wood shafts. 

2448 Double Furrow Gang Plough, with steel-mould board and 

shares. 

2449 Barrow Broadcast Grass Seed Sower, specially adapted for one 

man, will sow any quantity of grass-seed per acre. 

2450 Hand Broadcast Seed and Grain Sower, one man can sow four 

acres per hour. 

SHUTTLBWORTH, WILLIAM, 160 Queen-street, Melbourne. 

2452 Adjustable Rotary Com Screen, bv Rainforth and Son, Lincoln^ 
England. (Non-competitive.) 

SWAN & WHITE, 60 and 62 Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

2454 Reaping Machine. 

2455 Plough. 

2456 ChaScutter. 

WEST, J. & B., Moont Alexander-road, Essendon. 

2457 One-horse Hay Rake, with improved method for raising frame. 



I 



1^8 CATALOGUE OF THE 



WILDING & CO., Elizabeth-street, Melboume. 

2458 Patent Reaping and Mowing Machine. 

2459 Travelling Box Wool Press, with double speed (patent). 

2460 Champion Excavator (patent). 

2461 Champion Drainer (patent). 

2462 Sample-case Bolts and Rivets. 



Gboup 45. 

DRYSDALE & FRASER, 131 King-street; Melbourne. 

2463 Punching and Shearing Machine. 

FORD, MICHAEL, Sandridge-road, Melbourne. 

2464 Rock-Boring Machine for driving levels, tunnels and sinking 

shafts, working in railway cuttings and quarries. Worked 
by compressed air, self-acting. Will work with the 
common drill. 

GOYNE & DAVIS, Epsom, near Sandhurst 

2465 Stamper Grating, 195 holes per square inch. 
2465a „ „ 225 „ „ „ 

HARKNESS, A., & CO., Victoria Foundry, Shamrock^sitreet, 

Sandhurst. 

2466 Cliff's Patent Disc, fitted on screwed stamper shank. 
246? Inside Shell, showing principle of Disc. 

2468 Cock's Patent Cam or Wiper, for lifting revolving stamps. 

LANGLANDS FOUNDRY CO. (Limited), 144 Flinders-lane 

West, Melbourne. 

2469 Ten Head of Stampers, for Quartz-crushing. 

2470 Set of Railway Crossings. 

2471 Semaphore. 

MEYERHOFF, Sandhurst. 
2471a Model of Amalgamator. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 159 

NANCE, DAVIES & CO., Arnold-street, Sandhurst. 

2472 Improved Stamper Grating, perforated with a machine-made 
Polish Panch, so as to effect a free and easy discharge. 
110 holes to square inch. 

S473 Improved Stamper Grating, 140 holes to square inch. 

2474 Improved Stamper Grating, 170 holes to square inch. 

2475 Improved Stamper Grating, 200 holes to square inch. 

O'MALLEY, EDMUND, 100 Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

2476 Ventilating Safety Gage, for mines. This cage acts as a ven- 

tilator to the mine, and should the rope break the cage will 
stick in the shaft ; there is also a bolt attached to the rope 
which liberates the cage on striking poppet heads. 

PERRY, HUNTER & CO., Foresl^street, Sandhurst 

2477 Varieties of Safety Fuse. 

2478 Stamper Gratings, various, from 80 to 250 holes per square 

inch. 

2479 Shot-hole Stamper Gratings. 

SERVICE, JAMES, & CO., 119 Collins-street West, Melbourne. 

2480 Burleigh Rock Drilling Machinery, comprising — Air Compresser, 

Steam Engine, Air Receiver, and Drilling Machine, with 
connections. « 

SEYMOUR, JOHN HENRY, Bendigo Ironworks, Sandhurst 

2481 Dovetailed Cam, or Wiper, for Quartz-crushing Machines, 

in two pieces, fitted to each other by dovetails. 



TEMPERLEY, JOHN R., 30 Queen^treet, Melbourne. 

2482 Warsop Rock Drill, operating on a block of stone, driven by 

compressed air at 201bs. per square inch. 

TYSON, THOMAS, 47 Elizabethnstreet, Melbourne. 

2483 Eainotomon Rock Borer. 

WHITE, DAVID, Engineer, Stawell. 

2484 Patent Model Safety Hook, to prevent accidents from over- 

winding in mining claims. 

2485 Pull-sized Working Hook. 



160 CATALOGUE OF THE 

Group 46. 

BRISCOE & CO., 11 Collins-street East, and 245 Elizabeth-street 

North, Melbourne. 
(Non-competftive.) 

2487 Screw Angers. 

2488 Spanners. 

2489 Wrenches. 

2490 Files. 

2491 Adzes. 

2492 Axes. 

2493 Mitre Saws. 

2494 Bench Screws. 

2495 Saw Vices. 

2496 Tube Cutters. 

2497 Joiners' Cramps. 

2498 Sash Cramps. 

2499 Drill Cramp. 

2500 Bench Holdfast. 

2501 Blacksmiths' Vices. 

2502 Gold Scales. 

2503 Beams and Scales. 

2504 Patent Plumbago. 

2505 Crucibles and Covers. 

2506 Plumbago and Clay Muffles. 

2507 Plumbago Stirrers, 

2508 White Fluxing Pots. 

2509 Hessian Crucibles. • 

2510 Morticing Machines. 

2511 Portable Forges. 

2512 Patent Eclipse Cooking Range. 

2513 Gas Heating Stoves. 

2514 Boring Machine. 

2515 Drilling Machines. 

2516 Pipe Vice. 

2517 Pipe Cutting and Threading Machine. 

2518 Carpenters' and Cabinetmakers' Tools, comprising — ^Planes, 

Chisels, Gauges, Bevels, Squares, Spokeshaves, Levels, 
Tenon, Hand, Ripping, Compass, and Lightning Tooth Saws, 
Turnscrews, Hammers, Compasses, Saw Sets, Pincers, Box 
and Taps, Tool Pads, Braces and Bits, Saw Pads, Drills, 
Gauges. 

2519 Assortment of Engineers' and Blacksmiths' Tools. 

2520 Circular, Crosscut, Pit, Mill, and Lightning Crosscut Saws. 

BUNCLE, JOHN, Parkside Machine Works, North Melbourne. 

2521 Cast Iron Saw Bench, with drag motion. 

2522 Firewood Saw Bench, for use by steam or horse power. Are 

not liable to get out of order, or the saw to get buckled. 

2523 Horsepower Works» 



INTEBCOLONIAI. EXHIBITION, 1 875. 161 

2524 Enpneers' Slotting^ Machine, made bj exhibitor. 

2525 Copying' Press, superior to imported article. 

CORBETT, A. G., & SON, 15 Queen street, Melbourne. 

(Non-competitive.) 

2526 New Improved Iron Saw Benches, by Marshall, Sons and Co., 

imported. 

DANES, BENJAMIN, Coventry-street, Emerald Hill. 

2528 Fret Sawing-machine, in motion by treadle. 

DANES, JOHN, 42 Bourke^treet West, Melbourne. 

2529 Bottle Mould, for glass-bottle makers. 

HOWITT, WILLIAM, 2 Little Latrobe^treet, Melbourne. 

2530 Mash Hammers, colonial-mada 

2531 Spalling Hammers, colonial-made. 

2532 Bricklayers' Hammers, colonial-made. 

2533 Patent Axes, colonial-made. 

2534 Diamond Hammer. 

2535 Axes. 

2536 Scabbing Pick. 

2540 Punches and Chisels. 

2541 Marble Tools. 

MARSDEN, ALEXANDER, 48 Stanley-street, Collingwood East. 

2547 Tools (assortment). 

RADKE, A., Hunter's Hill, Sydney, New South Wales. 

2548 Leather Mill Belting, 6 inch, double. 

2549 Leather Mill Belting, 4 inch, single. 

2550 Belt Laces. 

2551 Copper Rivets and Leather Hose. 

2552 Hide Rope. 

ROBERTS, OWEN, Lennox-street, Richmond. 

2553 Patent Self-acting Painting Machine. A man and two boys 

can paint 10,000 feet or 1000 laths per hour with this 
machine without the aid of steam-power. 

2554 Small Punching Machine, for punching Venetian blinds. 



Group 47. 

ANDRESEN, L. C, 35 Marke^st^eet, Melbourne. 

2555 Knitting Machine : knits hosiery, mittens and gloves of all sizes 
complete without a seam. 

M 



162 CATALOGUE OF THB 

BIRAM, RICHARD, 31 Latrobe-street West, Melbourne. 
(Non-competitive, except as to principle of application.) 

2666 Singers' Sewing Machine, to be driven by steam-power instead of 

treadling. 

CARTER, DAVID, Kew. 

2667 Table with Patent Movement, for lowering a sewing machine 

out of sight when not in use. 

GEACH, R, 143 Bourke-street East, Melbourne. 

2660 Sewing Machine, for the manufacture of frillings, worked by 

small steam engine, heated by gas. The Patent Frilling 
Attachments are made by the exhibitor and attached to a 
Willcox and Gibbs Sewing Machine. The Machine of 
American manu£EUSture. 

LONG & CO., 64 Elizaboth-street, Melbourne. 

2661 Sewing Machines^ <&c, new styles. 

MACK & ELLIS, 80 Collins-street Bast, Melbourne. 

2662 Willcox and Gibbs and Home Shuttle Sewing Machines, in 

operation. 

MASTERS, WM. HY., & CO., 97 Swanston-street, Melbourne. 

2666 Sewing Machines, with appliances, to be driven by steam-power. 

STORER, JOSEPH, Agent for Jones and Co.'s Sewing Machines, 

62 Bourke-street East, Melbourne. 

2667 Sewing Machines. 

WILSON, HUGH, Flomington-road, Melbourne. 

2568 Improved Sole-cutting Machine. 

2569 „ Large Leadier Kolliug Machine. 

2570 „ Smidl Leather Kolling Machine. 

2571 „ Sole-pricking Machine. 

2572 Sole and other Knives. 
2673 Iron Lasts and Stands. 



Geoup 48. 



ANGLO-AUSTRALIAN PRESS AGENCY, 49 Collins-street West, 

Melbourne. 

2674 The Office Printer: a new process of printing from paper, con- 
sisting of a blotting- pad of chemically prepared paper in a 
portfolio; this, used in combination witn an ordinary copy- 
ing press, will multiply manuscript to the extent of seyeral 
nundred copies. 



INTEBCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1^75- 1^3 

BOYD, CHARLES, 35 Sturt-street, Ballarat. 
2575 Book of Specimens of Letter-press Printing and Wood Guts. 

CALVERT, W., 87 CollinsHstreet East, Melbourne. 

2578 Electrotypes of Medallions. 

2579 Electrotypes of Seals, <£;c. <£;c., for printing purposes. 

CLARK, WILLIAM THOMAS, 54 Swanston-street, Melbourne. 

2580 Patent American Rubber Stamps. . 

2581 Inks for same. 

2582 General Stationery. 

COLTMAN, EDWIN, 136 Latrobe^street East, Melbourne. 

2583 Cylindrical Hand Printing Machine, rubber type (IXL). 

LAMBERT & CO., Eastern Arcade, Bourke-street, Melbourne. 

2584 India-rubber Stamps. 

2585 Inks. 

2586 Specimens of Designs for same. 

LEVEY, OLIVER, Herald-passage, Bourke-street, Melbourne. 

2587 Bookbinders' Stabbing Press. 

2588 Printers' Brass Rule and Lead Cutter. 

2589 Shooting Sticks, Brass, Zinc, and Iron Galleys. 

2590 Wrought and Cast Iron Chases. 

2591 Plain and Fancy Brass Rules, Circles, and Ovals. 
2591a Proof Press. 

MARKBY & AZZOPARDI, Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

2592 Electrotypes and Stereotypes. 

2593 Show Posters printed from Wood Blocks. 

ROBERTSON, GEORGE, Little Collins-street West, Melbourne. 
2d95 The Art of Bookbinding. 

ROESZLER, CHARLES G., 41 Swanston-street, Melbourne. 

^96 Bookbinders' Tools. 

^97 Numerical Paging Machine. 

m2 



164 CATALOGUE G^ THB 

STOKES & MARTIN, 100 CoUw-street East, Melbourne. 

2598 Dies. 

2599 Military Omamente. 

2600 Tokens. 

2601 Decanter Stoppers. 

2602 Embossing Presses. 

2603 General Manu&ctures in Metal. 

2604 Seals. 

2605 Medals. 

2606 Medal Preparation and Process of Medal-making. 

• WHITEHEAD & CO., Collins-street East, Melbourne. 

2607 Heraldic Shield, with Specimens of Die-sinking and Embossing. 

2608 Specimen Books of General Lithographic Printing and Emboss- 

ing. 

WOLF, RUDOLPH, 111 Little Bourke-street East, Mdibourne. 

2609 Embossing Lever Presses. 



DEPARTMENT 18. 

FIREARMS, ORDNANCE AND OTHER IN- 
STRUMENTS AND APPARATUS FOR THE 
DESTRUCTION OF LIFE, FOR HUNTING, 
TRAPPING, FISHING, MILITARY ENGI- 
NEERING. 

EXPERTS. 
Col. W. A. D. Anderson. | Capt. W. H. Panter. | Capt. W. H. Snee, Chairman. 



Up to the present time the art of man-killing in open warfare is on 
this side of the globe merely in its theoretical form. Our Volunteer 
Army has been taught how to kill an enemy scientifically, but no 
opportunity has yet been given it to turn theory into practice, conse- 
quently there has been no call upon such of our artizans as are able to 
invent and manufacture murderous weapons and projectiles. Every 
section of the firearms used in Australia is imported, from the heel- 

Iilate of a cheap fowling-piece to the sights on a 40*guinea breech- 
oader. Those who take an interest in the advancement of Australian 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 165 

trade mny wooder how it is, that possessing as we do so many beauti- 
fully veined and richly -coloured woods, our sportsmen do not have their 
g;un8 stocked with native timber. The fact is, native timber^ however 
beautifiil to the eye, is throughout either too heavy, or too brittle. 
The light wood cracks, and the heavy wood wearies the sportsman's 
arms. Of course the Colonial Army and Navv receives all war ma- 
terial from Her Majesty's arsenals at home^ but in this we are not 
singular, as there is not a soldier or sailor in the British service who 
does not draw his arms from the same sources, excepting some irregu- 
lar troops in the Indian Empire, who are allowed to select their own 
weapons. Although the guns built in the colony are composed of 
imported wood and metal, it is but just to say that the material comes 
out here quite in the rough, and is worked into shape by colonial 
workmen. Any sportsman in the colony who desires to pay a London 
price for a really first-class gun or rifle can procure the same article for 
the same money in Melbourne, and have it made to order. 

If the Colonial Forces were called out on active service there would be 
no diflficulty in getting together a sufficient staff of armourers; but if a 
piece of heavy ordnance required re-boreing or re-rifling, it could not be 
done, as we have no machinery fit for the purpose. Small arms can 
be re-bored and rifled here, as one gunmaker has all the apparatus 
required. The reason of the small demand for armourers and gun- 
makers in Australia is easily given. In the first place, guns good 
enough to serve the purpose of those who make a living by procuring 
wild fowl, rabbits, opossums, kangaroo skins, &c., for the market, can 
be bought at any pawnbroker's shop for XI, and often for less. 
Secondly, military firearms are little used, and are in the hands of 
intelligent men who know how to use them. 

In Victoria no sporting gunpowder is made, nor percussion caps, gun 
wads, bullets, shot, or cartridges. The patent cartridges for ureech- 
loaders are imported in large quantities, but they are filled with im- 
ported powder and detonatives by imported machines, which the sports- 
man can buy here almost as cheaply as in London. 

The men who understand the art of making the various weapons, 
snares, and traps by which fish are taken have even a worse chance of 
earning a living than gunsmiths, for as we have never fairly tried to 
make deep-sea fishing an industry, there is no demand for nets or line. 
AU the steel, iron, brass, and other work used in fishing tackle, from a 
harpoon to a fishhook, comes from Great Britain, Europe, and America. 
It is in the Colony with fishing rods as with gun stocks — we have lots 
of workmen who can make them, but no Australian wood combining in 
itself the requisite amount of toughness and elasticity combined with 
lightness. 

Whilst writing on the subject of arms, nets, snares, and other ap- 
paratus made for the destruction of life, the weapons made by the 
native Australian and his myriad of cousins who people the islands in 
the South Pacific must not be allowed to pass without mention. Spears 
and clubs are the weapons mostly used in wariare by the aboriginals 
and South Sea Islanders, and the ingenuity shown in their construction 
is remarkable. Unlike the Cafires of South Africa, the natives of 



166 CATALOGUE OF THE 

Aiistralasia have no iron to work upon^ consequently they have to 
depend upon hard wood, bone, stone, and seaneihell for the penetrating 
portions of their weapons. A glance at the native-made spears and 
arrows in the Exhibition will astonish the beholder, who, seeing them 
for the first time, will have his ideas respecting the extreme ignorance 
and laziness of an Austral aboriginal somewhat upset. There are in 
the Exhibition some South Sea fishing spears that are perfect works of 
art, showing that the men who without other tools than those supplied 
by Bame Nature can (with shark's teeth, fishbones, pearl oyster shell, 
wood scraped to a fine point and hardened in the fire, the leg bones of 
animals and birds, and pieces of flint), produce neatly finished weapons, 
must possess more intelligence than is usually ascribed to them. 



Group 49. 

CALVERT, W., AND BRENAN, LOUIS, 87 Collins-street East, 

Melbourne. 

2610 Working Model of Newly-invented Fish Torpedo, the principle 

of which is applicable to many other useful purposes. 

HART, LEWIS H., Royal Arcade, Melbourne. 

2611 Native Weapons, &c. (fee. 

KREITMEYER, EMILY, Waxworks, Bourke-street, Melbourne. 

2612 Suit of Armour. 

LE SOUEF, ALBERT A. C, Parliament House, Melbourne. 

2613 Miniature Native Weapons, one-fourth the size of originals. 

MITCHELL, GRAHAM, Ejrk's Bazaar, Bourke-street East 

2614 Humane PoUaxe, for destroying horses, cattle, &c. 

2615 French Revolver. 

WELCH, HENRY P., Ashbourne, Toorak. 
2615a Japanese Officei-s' Dress, on Wax Figure. 



DEPARTMENT 19. 

MOTORS AND APPARATUS FOR THE GENERA- 
TION AND TRANSMISSION OF POWER, 
LOCOMOTIVES, RAILWAY PLANT, FOUN- 
DRIES, &c. 

EXPERTS. 
William Ekdon, Esq., | R. G. Ford, Esq. A. K. Smith, Esq. 



Chairman. | T. B. C. Kobinson, Esq. 



William Williams, Esq. 



The exhibits Goming especially under the name of Motors, or apparatus 
for the generation and transmission of power, are extensive, and do 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 167 

justice to the manufacturing skill and engineering talent of Victoria. 
The exhibits chiefly consist of horizontal hydraulic engines for wood and 
iron turning ; engines used for pmnping and winding, to be used on 
TniTiing clainis; reciprocating cylinder water engine, capable of 300 revo- 
lutions per minute, to be used for pulling punkahs, for the purpose of 
cooling rooms; hoisting engines mounted on carriages with double wheels, 
either to run on rails or not; models of locomotives; boilers, multi- 
tubular with water-bridge; Comisli boilers with galloway tubes and 
water-bridge. A novelty is exhibitt.'d in the shape of a wind and water 
mill, manufactured by the exhibitor. There is also a self-acting glass 
conducting lubricator. Another exiiibit in this class is a machine con- 
structed of iron and wood for excavating water-tanks, for steam or horse 
power, and which was invented aiul patented by the exhibitor. The 
varieties of pumping apparatus are numerous. The principal varieties 
are tube well pumps; centrifugal })imips to raise 2000 gallons per 
minute, and others which will raise 15,000 gallons per minute; air- 
pumpSy to be worked by two men, or horse-power; submerged force and 
lift pumps. There is also a portable water-collector and pimip for raising 
water to dams. Another machine for use in clothing factories is exhi- 
bited^ which will be driven by compressed air. Weaving is represented 
by a power-loom driven firom shafting, and a Jacquarie loom driven by 
steam-power. The greater part of these will occupy the building set 
apart for machinery in motion, and arrangements have been so made 
that visitors will have the opportujiity aflbrded them of seeing the 
motors in full operation. 

The Victorian industries which ])crtain to this department have in 
the last few years made rapid strides. The improvements which have 
taken place in mining machinery, and the erection of factories for local 
industries^ have mainly been the causes to which the advancement that 
has taken place in Victorian engineering works and foundries is due. 
There are 24 iron and tin works, four of which employ steam-power, 
giving employment to 459 hands. The value of the plant and 
machinery is £13,790, the land on which the factories are erected 
£19,950, and of the buildings £11,270. Of brass, iron, and copper 
foundries there are 65, giving employment to 1400 males and 3 females. 
The aggregate value of the machinery and plant is £109,952, of the 
land £56,616, and of the buildings £50,613. By discarding the 
generic name of foundries, and classing the various branches of tliis in- 
dustry as well as the information afforded will admit, the following 
results are arrived at: — There are in Victoria 46 Engine Machine 
manufactories. These include boilers, water wheels, gas engines, 
electro-magnetic engines, shafting, belting, pulleys and gearing, &c.: 
41 of them employing steam-power. The number of hanas employed 
is )129 men and 11 women. The value of the plant and machinery used 
is £27,930, the value of the land is estimated at £51,304, and the value 
of the buildings £48,090. The wholesale value of the manufactures 
produce(^ during the year 1874 was about £500,000. The largest 
establishment employs 144 hands, viz., 120 men ana 24 young persons, 
the former of whom earn 45s. per week, and the latter 20s. per week. 
The working hours are eight per day. The wholesale value of the manu 



166 CATALOGUE OF THS 

factures produced during the year 1874 was £51,344. Another gives 
employment to 170 hands, viz., 130 men and 40 hoys, the average 
working hours heing eight hours per day. The wholesale value of the 
manumctures for the year 1874 was £50,000. A factory, the value of 
the manufactures of which for the year 1874 amounted to £40,000, 
gives employment to 133 hands, viz., 94 men and 39 boys^ the wages 
of the former average £2 17s. 6d. per week, and of the latter 9s. 2d. 
per week. A factory giving employment to 118 men turned out in 
1874 work to the value of £34,524; and another giving employment 
to 84 hands, viz., 60 men and 24 boys, turned out work to the value of 
£30,000 during the year 1874. An establishment at Ballarat, employ- 
ing 91 hands, viz., 53 men and 38 boys, produced work in 1874 to the 
value of £23,942; this sum includes repairs to machinery, a branch 
that forms a considerable portion of the trade of the establishment 
A Melbourne factory employing 82 hands, viz., 70 men and 12 boys, 
produced work the wholesale value of which was £18,000, while the 
value of the manufactures produced by another factory employing 49 
hands amounted to £13,400. Two factories turned out work the Value 
of which amounted to over £11,000 each. The wholesale value of 
manufactures produced by one establishment amounted to over £9000, 
two over £8000, and three over £6000. The principal portion of the 
work done in two factories is millwright work, the largest of which 
employs 12 hands, viz., 8 men and 4 boys, the former of whom earn 
Is. per hour, and the latter from 3d. to 6d. The wholesale value of the 
manufactures produced in 1874 amounted to X8000. 

The manufacture of Locomotives is comparatively a new branch of 
Victorian industry, and in this branch of engineers' work the Phoenix 
Foundry, Ballarat, have certainly led the way. This establishment 
obtained the contract for several locomotives for the Victorian Govern- 
ment, and have turned out a class of work that does credit to the 
manufacturers and to the colonies. The Phoenix Foundry employs 153 
hands, viz., 120 men and 33 boys, whose working hours are eight per 
day. The average wages of the former are from 10s. to 13s. 4d. per 
day, and of the latter 6s. 8d. to 7s. 6d. per week. The wholesale value 
of the manufactures produced in 1874 amounted to <£41,433. 

One factory, the principal portion of the trade of which is the 
manufactory of carriage axles, employs 16 hands, viz., 4 men and 12 
boys. The wholesale value of the manufactures produced in 1874 
amounted to £3200. 

There are in Victoria six most prominent Iron and Brass Foundries, 
employing a total of 136 hands, the total value of the manufactures 
produced in 1874 being £54,100. The largest of these gives employ- 
ment to 50 hands, viz., 40 men and 10 boys, the earnings of the former 
being £2 10s. per man per week, and of the latter £1 per week. The 
wholesale value of the manufactures produced in 1874 was £22,000. 
Another employs 47 hands, viz., 25 men and 22 boys ; and the whole- 
sale value of the manufactures produced in 1874 was from £8000 to 
£10,000. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 169 

The largest establishment, the trade of which eombines Brass- 
founding and Coppersmiths' works, employs 133 l^nda^ yv^, 04 men 
and 39 Doys, the earnings of the former bemg d£2 17b. 6d. per week, 
and of the latter 9s. 2d. per week. The wholesale value of the manu- 
factures produced in 1874 was £40,000. 

The largest establishment for Brassfounding and the manufiaoturinK 
of Chandeliers, gives employment to 35 hands, viz., 15 men and 20 
boys, the former of whom earn 11^. per day, and the latter 2s. 6d. per 
day. The value of the work turned out in 1874 was £6600. 

Only two Lead Works exist, giving employment to 13 hands. The 
value of the plant and machinery is X7800, of the land £2900, and of 
the buildings £2700. The largest employs 10 men, who earn £2 17s. 6d. 
per week, working eight hours per day. The wholesale value of the 
sheet-lead, lead and composite pipes produced in 1874 amounted to 
£30,000. 

There is one BqU Foundry in Victoria, which finds employment 
for two hands. The value of the plant and machinery is £100, the land 
£600, and the buildings £500. 

There are three Wire Working establishments in full operation. 
The aggregate number of hands employed is 15. The total value of 
the machinery and plant is £950, the value of the land is estimated at 
£1800, and that of the buildings in which business is carried on at 
£1250. 



Group 51. 

ANDRESEN, L. C, 35 Market-street, Melbourne. 

2616 Fire Quench Boxes, for extinguishing fire in buildings or ships. 

A five-pound box sufficient for 1200 cubic feet. 

CLEVELAND, WM., & SON, 15 Market Buildings, Melbourne. 

2617 Steam Pump. Can be used for driving machinery and also ibr 

pumping. 

DANES, JOHN, 42 Bourke-street West, Melbourne. 

2618 Steam Valves. 

2619 Steam Cocks. 

2620 Check Valves. 

2621 Suet Lubricators. 

2622 Injectors. 

2623 Boscoe's Lubricators. 

2624 General Brassfoundry. 
2626 Sluice Valves. 

DRYSDALE & ERASER, 131 King-street, Melbourne. 

2626 Silent Blast Fans for Cupolas. 

2627 Forges, &c. 



170 CATALOGUE OF THE 

FORD; R. O., JuN.; d4 St. Vincent-place, North Emerald HilL 

2628 Model Hiffh-pressnre Direct-acting Steam Engine. Diameter 

of cyKnder, 1 inch; length of stroke^ 1^ inch; worked 
by compressed air. 

KAY; JOSHUA A.; 89 Lonsdale-street East; Melbourne. 

2629 Model of New Mechanical Motion. 

MTHEESON, THOMAS, 205 Bourke-street West, Melbourne. 

2630 Steam-power Loom, for weaving Jute Cloth. 

MELBOURNE WOOLLEN MILL COMPANY, Limited (W. J. 
Lormer, Secretary), 29 Flinders-lane East, Melbourne. 

2631 Jacquarie Steam-power Loom, in motion. 

MUNRO, DAVID, & CO., 154 Queen-street, Melbourne. 

2633 Multitubular Boiler, with Waterbridge. 

2634 Cornish Boiler, with Galloway Tubes and Waterbridge. 

POTTER, ANDREW, 246 WelHngton-street, CoUingwood. 

2635 FauU's Patent Self-acting Glass Conducting Lubriqator. 

2636 High-pressure Water Taps. 

2637 Copper Hose Director. 

2638 Five-horse Power Patent Portable Steam Engine, fitted with 

variable Expansion Apparatus, feed water heater, enlarged 
fire-box for burning wood, mounted on wrought-iron 
travelling wheels. 

TOMBS, BURTON, 130 Lonsdale-street East, Melbourne. 
2638a Engineer's Taps and Master Taps, guaranteed Whitworth pitch, 
right and left handed, colonial-made. 

VICTORIAN WOOLLEN CLOTH COMPANY (John Anderson, 

Secretary), Geelong. 

2639 Steam-power Loom for Weaving Tweeds, in motion. 

WRIGHT & EDWARDS, Little Bourke-street West, Melbourne. 

2640 Movable Multitubular Boiler, of 80 horse-power, requiring no 

brickwork or building-in, exhibited by the makers (Wright 
and Edwards) at work supplying steam for all the 
machinery in motion. 

2641 A Horizontal Steam Engine, driving the shafting and machinery 

in motion, made by exhibitors. 

2642 Forge-finished Axles, made under the steam-hammer firom scrap- 

iron. 
2642a Finished Axles, steeled and turned. 
2642b Engine Connecting Rod, forged from scrap iron. 
2642c Eighteen-inch Lathe Head-stocks. 



INTEBCOLONIAL ETHIfilTIOKy 1875. 171 

Group 52. 

ANDR£S£N, L. C, 85 Market-street, Melbourne. 

2643 Sabmerg«d Pump, to procure water from great depths in mining' 

shiSts, for family use, agricultural purposes, manufiMtories, 
breweries, ships, watering gardens or lawns, washing 
carriages, quenclung fires, &c. i throws a stream of water 
60 feet. 

ATKIN, CHARLES AGER, 43 Errol-street, North Melbourne. 

2644 Powerful Double-action Air Pump, can be worked by two men 

or steam-power. 

BIGGS, E. T., Scotch College and Burwood-road, Upper Hawthorn. 

2645 Horizontal Hydraulic Engine. Can be used with steam, drives 

6in.; centre lathe for wood and iron turning. 

BONWICK, WM. P., Oxley-road, Hawthorn. 

2646 Wind and Water Mill, invented and manufactured by exhibitor. 

BROWN, WILLIAM, Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

2647 Steam Engine. 

CORBETT, A. G., & SON, 15 Queen-street, Melbourne. 

(Non-competitive.) 

2648 Nine-horse Power Patent Portable Steam Engine, by Marshall, 

Sons and Co., highly finished. The crank-shaft bearingH 
are of wrought iron ; on the tops of them dovetailed cuHt- 
ings are bolted for receiving the crank-shaft carriages, which 
slide in these dovetails. The cylinders, ?in. diameter, are 
steam-jacketed, and cast in one piece with the valve chest. 
Strong lugs are cast on the front end of the cylinders, to 
which are attached wrought-iron tubular stays for connect- 
ing same to the carriages of the crank-shaft; by this means 
the expansion or contraction of the boiler does not affect 
the relative position of the cylinders and crank shaft, at 
same time they are rigidly maintained in their respective 
positions, and the strain on the boiler is reduced to a 
minimum. This engine is also fitted with link-motion 
reversing gear. 

DANES, JOHN, 42 Bourke-street West, Melbourne. 

2649 Force and Lift Pumps, of various sizes and shapes, in brass and 

iron. 

2650 Fire Plugs. 

2651 Hydrants. 

2652 Directors. 

2653 Street and Court Stand Pipes. 

2654 Stop Bib. 

2655 Ferule Cocks. 



172 CATALOGUB OF THE 

DAVEY, THOMAS, & CO., 1 Queen-street, Melbourne. 
2666 Empire Windmill. 

m 

LEGRAND, A., 8 Talbot-court, Gracechurch-street, London. 

(Non-competidva ) 

2657 Norton's Patent Abyssinian Tube Wells and Pumps. 

LOWE, J. E., Stephen-street, Melbourne. 

2668 Reciprocating Cylinder Water Engine, capable of 300 revo- 
lutions per minute, used to pull punkahs for the cooling of 
rooms, 



IS per 



M^COMAS & CO., 49 King-street, Melbourne. 

2669 M^Comas's Water Lifter, driven by steam. 

2660 „ „ „ „ horse-power. . 

2661 „ „ „ „ hand. 

M^CALL, ANDERSON & CO., 138 Flinders-lane West, Melbourne. 

2662 Double Hoisting Engine, 6^inch cylinder, 12-inch stroke, 

80 lbs. pressure (Government) on boiler, mounted on 
carriage with double wheels either to run on rails or not. 

MASTERS, W. H., & CO. 

2663 Sewing Machine Engine, to be driven by compressed air, for 

use in clothing factories and other purposes. 

MILLIKEN, DAVID, Engineer, Sandhurst 

2664 One Patent Pumping Wheel. 

M'LEAN BROTHERS & RIGG, 69 Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 
2666 Wine Pump. 

MORTON, J. LOCKHART, Caroline-street, South Yarra. 

2666 Boring Apparatus, for boring to any depth without increasing 

mechanical difficulties (invented by exhibitor). 

ROBERTS, A., & SONS, Sandhurst. 
(Non-competitive). 

2667 Direct-acting Steam Pimip. 

SCOTTHORN, WILLIAM, 73 Roden-street, West Melbourne. 

2668 Model of Patent Steam Coach, worked by rotatory engine. 

WRIGHT & EDWARDS, 99 and 100 Litde Bburke-street West, 

Melbourne. 

2669 A Portable Centrifugal Pump, with adjusted suction pipe to 

suit any angle of slope, for draining swamps, sheep wash- 
ing, &c., made by exhibitors. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1S75. ^"^^ 

3670 One oi exhibitors' Patent Sheepwashing Jets. 

2671 Fountain, the water for which is raised oy a centrifugal pump, 
capable of pamping 20,000 gallons of water per minute, 
drawn by a stoam-engine nominally 12-horse power. 
Pump and engine made oy the exhibitors. 



DEPARTMENT 20. 
BOATS, SAILING, STEAM VESSELS. 



EXPERTS. 



Captain H. A. Coffey. 



Captain W. H. Panter, R.N. 



Captain Robert Fullarton. Commander H.J.Stanley, R.N.,Chairman. 



The history of the rise and progress of the trade of the several ports in 
the Colony of Victoria must be looked for in the elaborate statistics 
published by the Registrar-General. It is sufficient in this place to 
note the number and tonnage of the steam and sailing vessels belonging 
to the Colony, and the number of their crews on the 31st Decembety 
1874, the date of the last returns: — 

Vessels. No. Tonnage. Men. 

Steam 47 10,422 722 

Sailing 382 60,274 2507 

Totals 429 70,696 3229 

Among the other subjects enumerated in the groups named may be 
mentioned the fine lifeboats which are in use on the coasts of this 
Colony. These are five in number, are maintained entirely at the cost 
of the Victorian Government, and are in charge of the Harbour 
Department They are built on the self-righting principle, and are, in 
all respects, constructed on the model of Mr. James Peake, late Master 
Shipwright of Woolwich Yard, who improved upon the boat which 
took the Duke of Northumberland's 200-guinea prize in 1851, built 
by James Beeching, of Yarmouth. The Victorian lifeboats are 
stationed at Queenscliff, Portland, Belfast, Warmambool, and Port 
Albert Their crews are exercised twice a quarter, and men who are 
employed outside the Government service on such occasions receive 12 s. 
a day. The heaviest weather is selected for the exercise, and the 
various crews are now become thoroughly efficient Each boat cost 
between ;^ 700 and ;£8oo, and a spare (single banked) boat is kept in the 
Marine Yaixi for the Special Coast Service. Each station is also supplied 
with Dennet's rocket apparatus, and Manb/s mortar and lines, and the 
men are practised in their use periodically. From the vn^eck of the 
Admdla in 1859, to that of the Eliza Ramsden in July, 1875, these 
lifeboats have been frequentiy the means of saving life. They are 
managed and worked under the same rules as that excellent institution, 
the Royal National Lifeboat Institution of England. 



174 CATALOGUE OF THE 

There are three Steam Dredges, two Steam Dredge Tugs, and about 
forty Pimts, belonging to the Government, which are kept up at a cost 
of about ;^ 18,000 per annum. It is hardly possible to get at their 
original cost, but on one alone (the Griper), between 1853 and 1855 
the sum of ;^ 23,000 was expended. They are employed as required in 
the River Yarra, alongside the Williamstown Railway wharf, and at 
Geelong. 

In the Colony of Victoria there are 13 Ship and Boat builders, i 
Blockmaker, i Floating Dock, 2 Graving;^ Docks, 5 Patent Slips (4 
worked by steam and i by manual labour) ; one Graving Dock engine is 
of 116 horse-power, and the other of 87, making a total of 203 horse- 
power. 

In the 13 Shipwrights' yards there are employed 51 males; in the Float- 
ing Docks, 29 males; Graving Docks, 66 males; Patent Slips, 82 males. 

Machinery and plant value — Ship and boat builders, ;£^ii9o; Floating 
Docks, ;£22oo; Graving Dock, ;£^52,6i5; Patent Slip,;^i4,7oo; Ship and 
boat buildings, value, ;^374S; Graving Dock, value of buildings 
^295,218; Patent Slips, value of buildings, £$^^535- 

The cost of the Alfred Graving Dock was ;£ 343,000, but for the 
purpose of calculating a Dr. and Cr. account, the dock was estimated 
at the value of ;£^2 50,000, the rest of the money having been expended 
in reclaiming the land. 

Revenue of the dock to 30th June, 1875, ;£'2 2i4 2s. 2d., exclusive of 
;;^3ooo paid by the P. and O. Company for docking 25 ships as per 
contract 

Government Patent Slip — Revenue, ;^6o9 7s. 8d., from 15th 
December, 1874, to 30th June, 1875, for 10 ships. 



Group 55. 

BEALL, SAMUEL W., Sandhurst. 

2672 Full-rigged Model Yacht, ^' Change." 

CORNISH & CO., 2 Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

2673 Life Preserving Mattresses. 

2674 Life Buoys. 

2675 Combined Life Belts and Pillows. 

2676 Model of Life-saving Raft. 

2677 Seats and Couches, for general use in ships. 

De GRUCHY, Fuller's Boat House, Princes Bridge. 
, 2678 Model of Full-rigged Ship. 

GREENLAND, W. T., Yarra-bank, Princes Bridge, Melbourne. 

2679 Model of Shallop or Pleasure Boat, for lakes, canals or rivers, 
to carry twenty passengers^ and row with eight oars. 



INTEBCOLONIAL BXRIBITIOir, 1875. '^^ 

GREGORY, G. Y., Cramome^treet, Richmond. 

S680 Drawing Plan of a Clipper Ship, 3000 tons, combining speedy 
economy, and conuort 

JONES, D., Swanston^fltreet, Melbourne. 

2681 Model of Ship. 

LAST, H. J., 40 Bank-street West, Emerald Hill. 

2682 Half-model of a Ship. 

MILTON, MRS. FANNY, Nott-street, Sandridge. 

2683 Life Buoy ) 

2684 Swimming Belt > Showing the process of manufacturing. 

2685 Life Belt ) 

2686 Sheets of Cork Wood. 

OGILVIE, CHRISTIAN. 

2687 System for Launching Boats at Sea. 

PROCTOR & HILL, High-street, St. Kilda. 

2688 Model of Galvanised Iron Boat 

STEPHEN, FRANCIS J. S., Solicitor, 37 Swanston-street, Melbourne. 
2688a a Boat for Saving Life. 

WATTS, W. K., Wellington-parade, East Melbourne. 

2689 Model of a Three-masted Fore-and-aft Schooner. 

2690 Model Frigate. 

2691 Sailing Model of an Ironclad Ram Frigate. 

2692 Sailing Model of a Gun Despatch Vessel. 



Group 56. 

DA VIES, D., Hawke^treet, West Melbourne. 

2693 Working Model of a Screw Steamer. 

FORD, F. W., 84 St Vincent-place North, Emerald Hill. 

2694 Screw Steamboat, 24in. long, 4}in. beam, 4^in. deep. Will 

work for one hour without attention by means of com- 
pressed air. 

2695 Paddle Steamboat, 24in. long, 4^in. beam, 4in. deep. Will 

work for one hour without attention bj means of com- 
pressed air. 

TOMBS, BURTON, 26 Chnreh-street, Richmond* 

2696 Steam Engine for Launch from 20 to 2^ feet long. 



176 CATALOGUE OF THE 

Gkoup 57. 

GIBBS & McINTYRE, 7 Berret-place, Gracechurch-street, London. 

2697 DolbVs Patent Water Bottle Life Buoy. A water-can and life- 
buoy combined. (Non-competitive.) 



DEPARTMENT 21. 
CARRIAGES, BUGGIES, &c. 



EXPERTS. 



T. Gittus, Esq. 
Benjamin Lee, Esq. 
Thomas Lee, Esq. 



F. B. Parrott, Esa. 
James Eawlings, Esq. 
C. L. Stoneman, Esq. 



William Williams, Esq.^ 
Chairman. 



Colonial-made Carriages, Buggies, Hansom Cabs, Broughams, Ba- 
rouches and Waggonettes can be turned out in Victoria of a quality equal 
to almost the best imported vehiclea. At the last Exhibition held .in Mel- 
bourne, 32 vehicles of various sorts were shown in the Carriage annexe, 
and when making awards, the Chairman of the Jury for Carriages gave the 
verdict of his jury in the following words : — "The jurors consider that great 
praise is due to those conducting this important industry, for the enei^gy 
they have displayed in its development, as is evinced by the great 
improvements to be seen in the design, style and finish of the carriages, 
which from their combined lightness and strength are peculiarly adapted 
to the requirements of this country, and will bear favourable comparison 
with the manufacture of any part of the globe." 

English and American ash and hickory are imported in large quanti- 
ties for coachmaking purposes ; Kauri pine from New Zealand is also 
largely used, as it is durable, takes a fine polish, and looks well as 
paneling, etc Until very recently all springs and Axles had to be im- 
ported, but now the manufacture of these articles is a growing trade, 
which promises soon to become a flourishing one. The buggy is still the 
form of vehicle most used and best adapted, but waggonettes are rapidly 
becoming the fashion, and together with omnibuses, appear likely ere 
long to supersede the time-honoured Albert car. The imported wood 
comes out in the rough, with the exception of shafts and spokes which, 
as a rule, arrive in a state ready to be put together, minus the paint and 
varnish. 

The ironwork used in carriage building is mostiy worked into shape 
by colonial workmen from imported metal. For gilt, bronze, and plated 
carriage fittings, we are mostly indebted to importers. The number 
of carriage and waggon factories in Victoria is 96, six of which 



INTEBCaLOKIAL KXHIBITION, 1875. 177 

employ machinery worked by steam-power, and the whole give 
employment to 1129 males and 11 females. As the Government 
statistics do not in most cases give the value of the articles produced in 
the various departments of trade, the special information supplied by 
master tradesmen must be relied on. 

Thirty-four employers of labour in the coach and waggon building 
line of business have sent to us reports showing that their combined 
efforts turn out goods to the value of ^£^99,000 a year. These employers 
pay wages to 395 men, women, and youth of both sexes. ^£2 los. is 
the average rate of wage per week per man, and, as in all the trades,the 
remuneration given to women, apprentices, and young people depends 
entirely upon agreement between themselves and employers. During 
the past year the thirty^our craftsmen above mentioned have paid away 
in wages alone ;^i4,323. 

The market prices of vehicles may be classed as follows : — First<Jass 
family landau carriages, ;£30o; broughams, from ;£^2oo to ;£'22o; well- 
made serviceable buggies can be bought at rates varying from jCs^ ^^ 
j[fio uncovered, and from ;£^7o tO;^8o and ^90 covered; two-seated 
buggies may be got at prices ranging from ;;^ 3 5 to ;^4o; and tilburies, 
waggons, and small craft of that sort may be had for about ;^ 20 or j[^2^ ; 
waggonettes cost from J[^Zo to ;£^ioo, according to the nature of their 
fittings, and from;£'5o to £fio is the usual price of a street car. Trades- 
men's spring carts fetch about from;^25 to 30 guineas, and merchants' 
drays for canying cases, parcels, etc., can be built for from ^35 tO;^45. 
The cost of farm carts averages from ;^i5 to ;£^3o. 



Group 58. 

BRAID, ALEXANDER, Wreckyn-street, Hotham. 

2698 Horse Street-scraper, used by Corporation of Melbourne. 

CHAMBERS, WILLIAM C, Flemington-road, Melbourne. 

2699 Barrows for carrying Wheat. Designed, made, and "pro- 

visionally protected" by exhibitor. 

2700 Children's Carts, Toys, &c. 

CLAPP, 0. B., Latrobe-street West, Melbourne. 

(Non-competitive.) 

2701 Dodd's Patent Crystal Carriage. 

CLAPP, F* B., Latrobe-street West, Melbourne. 

(Non-Qompetitive.) 

2702 Concord Buggy ) Manufactured by Abbot, Downing and Co., 

2703 Cabriolet J America. 

K 



178 CATALOGUE OF THE 

CRUTCH, WILLIAM, 5 and 7 Latrobe-street, Melbourne. 

2704 Brougham, with pole and patent dial for directing the move- 

ments of the coachman, and with lamps. 

2705 Phaeton Buggy, with extension top pole, shafts, and lamps; 

patent wheels and eccentric lock, with king bolt in front 

2706 C Spring Queen's Phaeton, with two seats, to remove at pleasure; 

shai'ts and lamps. 

2707 Double-seated Imitation Abbot's Buggy, with pole, shafts, and 

lamps. 

2708 Jump-seat Buggy, with shafts and lamps. 

EWING BROTHERS, Franklin-street West, Melbourne. 

2710 Piano Box Buggy. 

2711 C Spring Landau. 

2712 Victoria Phaeton. 
2718 Coal-box Buggy. 

GALLAND, JOHN, 63 Victoria-parade, Fitzroy. 

2714 Victoria Phaeton. 

2715 Albert Phaeton. 

GARDINER, JAMES HENRY, Courtney-street, Hotham. 

2716 Perambulators. 



g- 



GLENI8TER, GEORGE, 65 Moorabool-street, Geelon 

2717 Crank Axletree, mail patent. 

2718 Solid Flap Axletree, mail patent. 

2719 Half-patent Solid Collar. 

2720 Common Nut Axle. 

GLENISTER, W. A., Mercer-street, Geelong. 

2721 li inch Ceilings' Patent Axletree Arm. 

2722 Ij „ Mail Patent Axle, 

2723 li if Improved Half-patent Axle. 

2724 li „ Half-patent Axle. 

2725 ll „ Common Nut Axle. 

2726 Model Ceilings' Patent Crank. 

HARRATT, HENRY, Chetwynd-street, Hotham, 

2727 Pair 1^ inch Ceiling's Case-hardened Axles. 

2728 „ If „ ^ail Patent „ „ 



2729 
2730 
2781 
2732 



;!} 



1 



jy }y yy 

Half-patent „ „ 

» j> »> 

Common Nut Axles. 



CfTIBCOJLOSUU^ IXHUttttQlf^ iSTS* 1^9 



2733 BidbQBBbi^ n:«i and Die. 

2734 EnbooRng PrassandDie. 

2735 Two Pimr <rf^ Gwrttge ^prtBgai 

HOUGHTON, W. a, 4 Ca, 8 Bridg^wad, RickwM»4 

2736 Two PenmbaktofSw 

LOSD, S9N <jb CO., 126 CoUia^treet Wesi, Melboun^ 

(Non-eompetitiYe.) 

2737 End-spring Roekaway, standings dnek top> douUe seat, pole. 

2738 End-spring Baggy, shafts. 

MCDONALD, A., 4 SONS, 12, 14, 16 Leveson^treet, Hothwa, 

2739 Victoria Phaeton. 

2740 Albert Phaeton. 

PARROTT, FREDERICK BARTON, Alfred-street, Prahran, 

2741 Springs. 

2742 Axletrees. 

PERRY, JOHN, 167 Russell-street and 86 Lonsdale-street, 

Melbourne. 

2743 Steam -bent TinAer, for carriage building and wheelwright 

purposes; also Turnery. 

2744 Hay Rakes. 

2745 Handles. 

ROBERTSON, WAGNER & CO., Coach Factory, Ciwtlemftlne. 

2746 Landau Carriage. 

ROYAL, JOSEPH, & SON, Leicester and Barry streets, Carlton. 

2749 Pair of Coach Axles, fixed with wrought-iron screwed flanges. 

2750 Set Well-hardened Noiseless Omnibus Axlen, with well-chillad 
' boxes. 

2751 Brake Screws, for waggons. 

2752 Bolts, for wine puncheons. 

2753 Cheese Press Screw, single thread. 

2754 Cheese Press Screw, double thread. 

SAMWELI^, H., 121 Flioders-kne East, MalhQurm, 

2755 Two-seated Single Top Buggy. 



180 CATALOGUE OF THE 

2756 C Spring Phaeton. 

2767 Two-Wheeled Side Car. 

STEVENSON & ELLIOTT, 171 King-Btreet, Melbourne. 

2768 Mail Phaeton, for two or four horses, PreniJh style. 

2769 Light Waggonette, with patent wheels. 

2760 Landau, with patent hood,, patent steps, and patent fitting^ for 

inside seats. 
2760a Goddard Buggy. 

STONEMAN, ALFRED, Stephenson-street, Bichmond. 

2761 Pair Buggy Side Springs. 

2762 Pair Elliptic Side Springs. 

2763 Pair Spring Cart Side Springs. 

2764 Perambulator. 

STONEMAN, EDWARD, Stephenson-street, Richmond. 

2766 Child's Carriages. 

2766 Carriage Springs. 

2767 Railway Truck Springs. 

VICTORIAN CARRIAGE COMPANY, Queen and Latrobe streets 

Melbourne. 

2268 American Express Waggon. 

2769 Pony Queen's Phaeton. 

WATTS, GEORGE, 49 Fitzroy-street, Melbourne. 

2770 Block of Iron, 12 lb. weight, with strap attached, intended to 

stop a horse when in any kind of vehicle by being attached 
to the bit by the strap, the block of iron remaining on the 
ground. 

WEST, J. & B. 

2771 Hay Dray. 

WHITE, DANIEL, 245 Swanston-street, Melbourne. 

2772 Goddard Buggy, with ipatent lever top, steel axles, and wrought 

iron case-hardened boxes, with pole, shafts, and lamps. 

2773 Trap, the "Advertiser," with Eaglish under-carriage, and a 

clock on each side; shafts only. 

2774 Sporting Phaeton of Polished Wood, with iron perch pole,. 

shafts, and four-in-hand harness. 



» 

INTEBCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 181 



DEPARTMENT 22. 

EDUCATIONAL APPARATUS AND METHODS; 
TYPOGRAPHIC AIDS TO THE PRESERVA- 
TION AND DISSEMINATION OF KNOW- 
LEDGE, INSTRUMENTS OF PRECISION 
AND APPARATUS OF PHYSICAL RESEARCH, 
EXPERIMENT AND ILLUSTRATION; IN- 
DUSTRIAL DESIGNS; MOSAIC AND IN- 
LAID WORK; ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNS; 
DECORATION OF DWELLINGS AND PUBLIC 
BUILDINGS. 



EXPERTS. 



Rev. J. E. Bromby, D.D., 

ChaumaiL. 
M. H. Irving, Esq., M.A. 



S. W. M*Gowan, Esq. 
Joseph Reed, Esq. 
Colonel E. W. Ward. 



George Foord, Esq. 
J. D. Kirkland, Esq. 



TOYS, GAMES, &c 

The only Toys we make for ourselves are wooden horses, waggons 
carts, and wheelbarrows, and ^vickerwork baskets, dolls' peram- 
bulators, &c. 

The toys in use among us are chiefly of European manufacture, and 
are imported from England? a few also come from China. The im- 
portation amounts to about ;^ 12,000 a year. Every novelty for the 
amusement of the young that is introduced in London very speedily 
makes its appearance here also. 

Games and the materials of games require more extended notice, 
because out-of-door sports and amusements fill a very important part in 
the lives of our boys arid young men, and are among the most potent 
of the influences under which a Victorian national character is growing 
up, while their tendency is almost wholly in the right direction. Our 
climate is exceptionally favourable to muscular ptay; a dry, clear 
atmosphere stimulates the energies of the people, and impels old and 
young to find an outlet for their superabundant vitality in vigorous 
sports. In and around Melbourne and the other towns of the colony 
there are numerous spaces of ground which have been wisely reserved 
for public uses, and Uiese form excellent arenas for out-of-door games. 
The conductors of our principal schools afford every encouragement to 
rational play, and the parents of the colony are liberal in supplying their 



132 CATALOGUE OP THE 

sons with the implements necessary to their prosecution. Under these 
favourable conditions cricket, football, rowing, <fec., are pursued with an 
ardour and perseverance seldom witnessed elsewhere. Every college 
and high school has its senior and junior club for the cultivation of each 
of these sports, and matches are of constant occurrence, at one sport or 
another, all the year round, sometimes among the pupils of a college or 
school, at other times between one school and another. The physical 
training which our boys thus receive makes theln hardier and more 
generally efficient than they would otherwise be, and the moral training 
concurrently received is even more valuable. Boys who are accustomed 
to put forth the whole power of their bodies and minds, to suffer fatigue 
and even some danger, in knocking a ball about, will certainly make 
better soldiers or sailors in after-life, better explorers or bushmen. 
And there is reason to believe that the benefits of these sports are already 
to be discovered in the character and manners of our young men. 
Teachers who have had great experience in middle and upper class 
schools both in Great Britain and in Victoria, say that our lads compare 
favourably with those of the old country — that they are gentler in their 
manners, less addicted to rough practical joking or to precocious 
smoking and drinking, and much less given to the surreptitious study of 
prurient literature. 

The Cricket and Football materials used in the colony are imported, 
and are the best procurable. 

Of Aquatic Sports we have the usi|al variety, and for these there are 
good natural facilities. Two rivers afford favourable fields for practice, 
and there is within a mile of the capital a spacious lake, 3 to 4 feet deep, 
on which sailing-boats can be used even by the inexperienced without 
risk. Hobson's Bay and Port Phillip Bay afford opportunities for more 
venturous voyaging. Our rowing boats are nearly all made in the 
colony. The best are planked with cedar, their timbers, knees, &c, 
being of English ash. These cost about j£i sl foot, and some of them, 
8-oared, are 56 feet long. Cheaper boats are made of Kauri pine. 
Sailing boats of 20 to 25 feet cost, with sails, &c, ^^25 to ;;^35. 
Yachts of 5 to 1 2 tons burthen disport themselves in the waters of the 
bays already named, and the handling of them requires both skill and 
dexterity. On a regatta-day a flotilla of these has been seen to start 
in a gale of head-wind to beat down to the Heads, a distance of 30 
miles, and during many hours the young men who formed their crews 
have had to perform all the duties of seamanship, making and shortening 
sail as required, repairing damages, &c., and all the time wet to the 
skin. 

Our youths have not much opportunity to acquire dexterity with the 
Fowling-piece. There is some quail-shooting in the season, and a great 
abundance and variety of wildfowl in the lakes and lagoons; but the 
haunts of the birds are too distant from the city to be reached by 
schoolboys except during holidays. As they grow up, however, many 
of our lads practise assiduously with the rifle, and become expert in its 
use. For Fishing there are better opportunities. Mullet and bream visit 
our coast in large numbers, and enter our rivers, where they are some- 
times caught freely. A basket of 501b. of bream has been secured in a 



INTEBCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. ^^^ 

few hours. These fish are good to eat, but do not show much sport. 
They are caught with mud-worm or shrimp bait. In the waters of the 
Bay good sport is sometimes found by the fisherman ; schnapper, flat- 
head, trevally, flounders, etc., reward his patience when he is lucky. All 
our fishing material is imported. A silver-mounted rod, in 4 pieces, and 
12 feet long, of hickory or wabash-wood, costs 75s., and a luxurious 
fisher can spend the balance of a £5 note in other requisites. At the 
same time, a fit-out can be procured for 6d., so that every purse is suited. 
The sixpennv apparatus consists of an imported hazel rod at 4d., and 
the balance m string and hook. The boys take to fishing with great 
eagerness, and at certain seasons of the year are to be seen in hundreds 
plying their craft by the banks of the Yarra and Saltwater rivers, fi-om 
the piers and banks, etc. 

Nothing in what has been here said must be understood to imply that 
sports and games are only followed assiduously by the sons of well-to-do 
parents. As there is a sixpenny stand of fishing gear, so is there also 
the materials of other games at very low prices. It would appear that 
our eight hour system tends to the success of muscular sports. Appren- 
tices and factory boys are unable to get work enough for themselves in 
the usual hours of labour, and rush madly to cricket or football when 
released at dinner time or in the evening. 



TYPOGRAPHIC AIDS TO THE PRESERVATION AND 
DISSEMINATION OF KNOWLEDGE. 

At the Government Printing Office there is the best of printing 
machinery, added to and rehewed from time to time at considerable 
expense. At the Argus office there are three four-feeder Hoe machines 
with flying attachment, and two platten machines, used for printing the 
illustrated newspaper issued from the establishment. Also, eight folding 
machines and other apparatus. Two powerful steam engines give 
motion to them all. At the Age office, where the stereotyping process 
is in use, there is a Victory machine and others, folding machines, 
etc, with the necessary steam power. At other newspaper offices in 
town and country, and in the job offices, other machines are to be 
found in great variety, as well as presses of all kinds. Lithographic 
and copperplate presses also abound. Our manufacture of type is 
limited to the supply of sorts, in which manufacture old "letter*' is 
used up. The work turned out from our newspaper, book, and job 
offices is inferior to none. 

BOOKS, PERIODICALS, NEWSPAPERS. 

There is a considerable production of Books and Pamphlets in the 
colony. Of the latter, a list comprising hundreds could be compiled — 
reprints of sermons and lectures, controversial tracts on religion, science, 
and politics. If our publishers and printers were as trustful and 
sanguine as our pamphleteers could wish, the list by this time would 
have swelled to thousands, but they have a disconcerting way of looking 



184 CATALOGUE OF THE 

for payment on account. Of more ambitious Victorian publications, 
Mr. George Robertson's list contains a considerable number. Among the 
most important of his publications which are Victorian in every respect 
may be mentioned the works of Professor Hearn, Rev. P. Menzies, &a 
Among works published by him under arrangement with publishers 
elsewhere, are TroUope's "Australia and New Zealand," Farrafs "Life 
of Christ," "Supernatural Religion," "Kenelm Chillingly," "The 
Innocents at Home and Abroad," "The Gilded Age," "South Sea 
Bubbles/' "Bret Harte's Tales and Poems," and many others. Some of 
these works were brought out with great promptitude, in the best style, 
and had a large sale. Of some of them second issues have appeared at 
the same prices obtained for cheap foreign editions. Mr. Samuel Mullen 
produces Handbooks for the University Matriculation Examinations, 
for which there has been a great demand since young ladies were 
permitted to "go up;" also, lectures and sermons. Mr. Bailliere has 
been an extensive publisher, chiefly of medical works, gazetteers, 
directories, and legal works. His "Victorian Gazetteer," of 442 pages 
8vo, sells at 2 IS. Gazetteers for the other colonies produced by him 
sell at the same price. Messrs. Gordon and Gotch publish annually an 
excellent Handbook Almanac, which is full of statistical information, 
and also a monthly "Guide," which gives all necessary information 
in regard to the railways, coaches, steamboats, and hotels of all the 
colonies, besides a great deal of other useful information. Messrs. 
Clarson and Massina produce a large number of Song Books, which 
find a ready sale. It was they who printed Gordon's Bush Ballads, 
etc., which proved the most successful poetical venture the colony has 
witnessed. The poems were sold to the number of many thousands. 
Mr. Calvert makes a specialty of coloured Picture Books, which his 
authors cleverly adapt from familiar English models. They are turned 
out in excellent style. There is a considerable production of religious 
and temperance tracts in the colony, and a large number of almanacs. 
Also a "Bradshaw's Guide," "Turf Register,". etc. 

Thirty-two newspapers are published in the city of Melbourne, 22 in 
the suburbs, 76 in other parts of the colony. Of the city journals five 
are daily (three morning, and two evening), one bi-weekly, 1 2 weekly, one 
fortnightly, and the rest monthly. Of the monthly newspapers two are 
illustrated, two are scientific, and the rest religious or temperance. Of 
the country newspapers ten are daily, the others appearing thrice, twice, 
or once a week. The Argus is an eight-page paper of the usual size, but 
it has 10, 12, or 16 pages, according to the demands upon it. On Satur- 
day it generally is of 12 pages. The Age and Telegraph are four-page 
papers, except on Saturdays, when the former is of 8 and the latter of 
6 pages, both giving in these issues a great deal of miscellaneous reading 
matter. The Amtralasian and Leader are weeklies of 40 pages. These 
papers circulate extensively in the other colonies and New Zealand. 
The Weekly Times ^ Town and Country^ etc., are on the same plan as the 
Australasian, The Illustrated Australian News and Australian Sketcher 
are monthly pictorial newspapers, which are turned out in a style equal 
to those of London. They are of 16 pages,'half of which are occupied 
with illustrations. They are published before the departure of every mail 



IXTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. ^^^ 

for Europe, and serve as pleasant remembrancers to friends in the Old 
Country. 

In regard to the newspaper press of the Colony, it may safely be said 
that it is inferior to that of no other country in the world. In the as- 
siduity with which its materials are collected, it rivals the press of the 
United States, while in its tone it more resembles the English, avoiding 
personal details and sensational items. 



CHARTS, MAPS, AND GRAPHIC REPRESENTATIONS. 

MAPS. 

The exhibits under this section include specimens from the various 
ocal publishers. But the greater portion of the mapwork done in the 
colony is issued from the Department of Lands and Survey, and this 
will bear favourable comparison with similar publications produced in 
other countries. Of these exhibits special attention may be drawn to 
the three large maps of the colony engraved under the direction of Mr. 
A. J. Skene, the Surveyor-General, and Mr. A. C. Allan, Inspector- 
General of Plans and Survey. These are beautiful specimens of map- 
work, engraved on copper by Mr. Slight, and afterwards transferred to 
stone. The first is a large map of the colony in four sheets, drawn on 
a scale of eight miles to the inch, showing the hill and other physical 
features of the country. The second, in two sheets, on a scale of sixteen 
miles to one inch, is intended to display the relative positions of Vic- 
toria, with those parts of South Australia, New South Wales, and Tas- 
mania which it includes. The third map shown is on a scale of two 
miles to one inch, and is based on the Geodetic survey, which it is to be 
regretted was suspended about a year since, on the score of economy 
and press of other work. The maps now in process of construction by 
the Department on this scale will eventually become the standard 
county maps of the colony. 

Besides the above, there are some 300 original parish maps repro- 
duced annually by the Department. Twenty-five copies in/ac simile of 
every original map are printed on paper for the public use, and the 
original is put away as a record. These, as a rule, are again reduced to 
half-scale for sale plans, and a vast number are disposed of at every 
land auction at a nominal price, which is, however, sufficient to cover 
the cost of production. All these lithographic transfers are obtained by 
the well known photo-lithographic process first invented by Mr. J. W. 
Osborne, in September, 1859, in Melbourne, and now used all over the 
world. Since 1S60 this process has been worked with slight modifica- 
tions by Mr. J. Noone, the successor of Mr. Osborne, with admirable 
facility and exactness. 

ADMIRALTY SURVEY CHARTS. 

About the year 1855 it was found necessary by the Government to 
have surveys made of the principal ports of Victoria. The coasting 



186 CATALOGUE OF THE 

trade had become very extensive, and the existing charts were on a 
small scale, and not closely sounded. Those in common use had been 
constructed from the surveys of Commander Stokes and other naval 
officers, and were for the most part what are called ** running surveys." 
It became necessary to meet a want daily growing in magnitude, and 
Commander Ross was accordingly engaged on the special work, which 
he carried on for some three or four years. It was then found advisable 
to obtain from the Imperial Government a staff of Admiralty Surveyors, 
and New South Wales, South Australia, and Tasmania, made the same 
proposal. The application from each colony was complied with, and 
the stipulation in the case of Victoria was, that until a steamer was 
required for the outer soundings, the cost would not be more than ;^5ooo 
a year, of which the Admiralty agreed to pay half. In i860 Commander 
Cox and his staff of assistants accordingly arrived and proceeded to 
make surveys of Port Phillip and Westemport Bays, on a six inch scale. 
On the retirement of Commander Cox, the surveys were continued by 
Lieutenant Stanley until Commander Wilkinson's arrival. On that 
officer's death in 1867, after a temporary charge, which again devolved 
on Lieutenant Stanley, Captain Sidney assumed the conduct of the sur- 
vey. Finally, on his promotion, Lieutenant Stanley was placed in 
charge, and still continues to carry on operations. In 1868, when Com- 
mander Stanley became Admiralty Surveyor, the only part of the outer 
coast which had been surveyed was from Cape Otway to Cape WoUamai. 

By the end of 1873 the coast of Victoria was all surveyed, and a 
survey of King's Island made. Without this last the marine survey of 
the colony would have been complete in 1872, but it became also 
necessary to re-survey the West Channel and the Rip at Port Phillip 
Heads. 

In 1874 the West and South Channels were again re-surveyed, and at 
the latter part of the same year a survey of Bass's Strait was com- 
menced, the expense being borne conjointly by Victoria, Tasmania, 
and the Imperial Government. This piece of work was in progress 
when it was suspended for a time by the necessity for a re-survey of 
Hobson's Bay, and this being now complete, the staff will shortly return 
to Bass's Strait. 

It follows that in all these operations the trigonometrical survey which 
had been carried out under the superintendence of Mr. R. 1,. J. EUery, 
the Government Astronomer, had been of the highest value. The large 
amount of useful work thus performed by the Admiralty Survey in Vic- 
toria must be self-evident, and has been highly honourable to its con- 
ductors. 

The countrymen of the distinguished hydrographer, Maury, will well 
know how to appreciate such labours, and the seamen of all nations 
will not fail to recognise the value of their patient toils. That fruitful 
source of disaster at sea — inaccurate charts of the coasts of Australia — 
has been greatly diminished, and among the peaceful victories of science 
the work of the marine surveyors of Victoria is worthy of record. No 
more honourable duty has been performed than that in which Cox and 
Wilkinson, Boucher and Gowland fell a sacrifice. 



nVTSBCOLOHIAL HXHlBlTiOJi, 1^7^ ^^7 

The feHowmg is a brief synopsis of th^ Victoriaa Adlniiralty surv<jy: — 

I- Gloidg to Cape Otway. witii plaoj q£ Fordaihi Bay, Furt Fairy, 
and Lady Bay, by Stanley^ iSji. 
2. Portland Bay* ditto* ti^9* 
3* Port Fairy, ditto, iS/s* 

4. Lady Bay and Warmambool Harbour, dicto, i^7<x 

5. Basses Strait, two siieecs^ with plau:^ ot FnuikUu ^Ic^d, Kw*fug<? 
Cove, Murray s Passv Waterhoose Anchora^tfv ^ukI $>kiux Islaixi, with 
views. Various authorities, including Cox and Staulcy. 

6. Bass's Strait and Anchora^es^ Apollo and Louttit Bavji, Frank tiix 
Island Anchorage, Dahrymple Fort, Seal Bav^ and »ankliu HvkkI. 
Varioos authoritiesv includiag Cox and Stanley. 

7. Port Phillip, two sheets, by Cox, 1^64' Corrections to 1^74 t>y 
Stainley. 

8. Port Phillip Entrance, two sheets, by Cox. Correctiom to 1874 
by Stanley. 

9. Port PhiUip, Hobson's Bay, and River Yarra, by Cax» iS^. C\U' 
rections to 1875 by Stanley. 

10. Geelong Harbour, by Cox, 1865, 

11. Port Western, by Cox, 1865, Corrections to 1874 hy Stanley. 

12. Wilson's Promontory, with Corner Inlet and Feat Albevt, by 
Stanley, 1869-70. Corrected to 1871, 



GEOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL MAPS, 

Amongst the most beautiful of these works of art and utility are the 
maps published by the Mining Department, under the superiutciulcnt:u 
of Mr. R. Brough Smyth, the Secretary for Mines, Thei»e have Uccn 
so frequently described in the elaborate publications of the depai Uuent in 
former Exhibitions as to require only a passing reference jn thitt plat:c. 
Among them may be named the geological nrnpt* of Uallarat, ULLn:U- 
worth, the Cape Otway district, the Mitchell River, and Sandlmibt iiia- 
trict; a sketch map of Victoria, showing the distribution of fo» tiit Uclh i 
and 64 quarter sheets of various parts of the colony, all q( vfUnh aie 
sold at a very moderare price. 

GRAPHIC REPRESENTA'J iONS. 

The diagrams illustrating the Patents issued in Victoria fall wiiiiia 
this head. They are represented in the Kxliibition by nine x^uaiLo 
vofannes. From these we gather tliat the first patent registered in Vic- 
toria bears date 9th August, 1854. J-or two years after wards only ;^Q 
^jccifications appear to have been dej>osited. in 1856, however, a in:w 
Palent Law, offering greater facilities to inventors, <:auie inU) oi>ciaUuii, 
andtheiesult was a large increase in the appli<:ationb. Siiu:e that tunc 
to the end of July last the number reached 2081. 

In 1866 was commenced the compilation of a set of indi<;es in a 
printed form, and upon a plan adopted by the Knglish hatcia <;ili<.e. 



188 CATALOGUE OF THE 

The names are arranged alphabetically, the titles chronologically, and 
the inventions under headings in accordance with the subject-matter. In 
the last-named index short descriptions are given with the view of facili- 
tating search. In 1869 these descriptions were largely extended and 
illustrated by drawings. In addition to the indices tide publication of 
the whole of the Victorian specifications in abstract has been com- 
menced, the drawings of which are mostly reduced by photo-litho- 
graphy. 

It is in contemplation to follow up a pamphlet already published on 
the processes of food preservation by other volumes, showing the pro- 
gress of patented inventions and contrivances bearing upon important 
branches of colonial industry. The Patent Office also offers to public 
inspection, free of charge, a museum of models, specimens, etc., and 
the reports and specifications patented in New South Wales, New Zea- 
land, Canada^ Germany, Italy, Belgium, and the United States. 

TELEGRAPHIC INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS. 

The processes in Telegraphy in Victoria cannot but be highly interest- 
ing to visitors at the Philadelphia Exhibition. There is nothing specially 
new in the instrument exhibited in Melbourne, but it affords an oppor- 
tunity to enumerate a few facts respecting the electric telegraph in 
Victoria, and to add another testimony to the value of the system 
invented by the illustrious Dr. Morse. 

Twenty years ago only 72 miles of telegraph lines were in operation 
in Victoria. The colony now possesses 5600 miles of wire, 155 stations, 
and 400 instruments, which have cost something like £370,000. This, 
compared >vith the gigantic telegraph systems of the old world, may 
appear small, but those who remember the initiation of the project in 
1854 may draw an instructive comparison. On the 3rd of March in that 
year Mr. Samuel Walker M*Gowan, the present head of the Telegraph 
Department, sent from Melbourne to Williamstown the first message over 
a line constructed by him. It was received in a little room 8 feet 
square, in a building dignified with the name of "The Observatory," by 
Mr. R. L. J. Ellery, the present Government Astronomer. By the end 
of the year Geelong was in communication, and Queenscliff on the 30th 
January, 1855. The instrument adopted was Morse's Recording Tele- 
graph, and the cable wire laid across the Saltwater River was constructed 
and laid by the Penal Department. The first contract between Mel- 
bourne and Williamstown was taken at £193 15s. per mile; that from 
Williamstown to Queenscliff at £115 15s. per mile. Grove's nitric acid 
battery was used for the main line and DanielFs local battery for the 
instruments. 

The extension of telegraphic communication followed with the suc- 
ceeding years. In 1857 Melbourne was in connexion with Adelaide, 
and in 1858 with Sydney. In 1859 a cable was laid from Cape Otway 
to King's Island, and thence to the coast of Tasmania. This, however, 
failed in i860. The one now working was laid via Flinders in 1869* 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 18^ 

The network of wires gradually extended over the colony. The coast 
stations were established at Cape Otway, the Schank, Wilson's Pro- 
montory, Queenscliff, and at all the outposts, whence signals of disasters 
at sea have been frequently received Lines were erected on the routes 
of railway of Nos. 6 and 8 gauge of galvanised iron wire. The German 
porcelain insulator (No. 5) with screw insulating pin was invariably used. 
These lines were constructed at 2 2 poles to the mile, and these were 
chosen from red gum, ironbark, stringybark, or other hard wood. 
On the North-Eastem Railway line 1 20 miles of iron poles have been 
recently finished, which, as they are imported from the patentee — 
Oppenheimer — stand in over;£'3 each. 

Upon all long and important circuits the single current close circuit 
system, with the Morse embossing and ink writing instruments (second- 
ary action) are used; and upon short and unimportant circuits the 
Wheatstone's alphabetical dial instruments. 

Of Morse's instruments there are 250 in use, of Wheatstone's 125. 

There are 3100 cells in the main battery, 750 cells in the local bat- 
tery, total 3850. 

Meidinger's sulphate of magnesia battery, and Chester's form of 
"Smee's" battery, are both in use for main batteries. For local batteries 
the sulphate of copper battery is chiefly used. For electric bell cir- 
cuits, the Leclanche battery is employed. 

Over all these lines in Victoria the uniform rate of one shilling for ten 
words came into force on ist January, 1870. 

The coast stations report three times each day, passing, arriving, or 
departing vessels, state of the weather, etc. Time signals from the Mel- 
bourne Observatory for comparison or correction of mean time are 
passed over all the lines throughout the colony at i p.m. daily. The 
clocks at the Railway Stations, in Parliament Houses, at the General 
Post-ofhce, and at several clockmakers', are controlled by the Electric 
Clock at the Observatory. The principal railway stations are connected 
by telegraph wires, and the arrival and departure of trains notified. 
Private telegrams are received from and transmitted to other telegraph 
stations. Letters containing telegraphic messages are forwarded from 
any post-office (of which there are some 850), to the nearest telegraph 
office, without extra fee, and thence transmitted. Franked transmission 
form books are also provided. The Department offers inducements to 
operators to become expert by a bonus allowance from five per cent, to 
fifty per cent on their salary, and the awards are made annually by a 
Board of Examiners appointed for the puipose. 

In thinly populated places where a telegraph office is necessary, but 
where the business is light and the revenue small, lady operators are 
placed in charge. 

So well recognised are the advantages of having telegraphic communi- 
cation, that in several townships where offices are now open, the depart- 
ment is guaranteed against loss by several of the principal residents. 
Besides this, private wires are growing very popular. Business men of 
all classes, large factories and other establishments, are utilising the 
system. The Public Library, the Crown Lands, and the General Post- 



190 CATALOGUE OF THE 

ofRce, are all in communication with the fire brigade, and it is intended 
to extend these fire alarm signals all over the city. 

During the year 1874, the sum of ;^24,i34 was expended on the con- 
struction and maintenance of the telegraph lines in Victoria. 

Before May, 1876, there is every probability that New Zealand will be 
in communication with New South Wales, and the West Australian line 
from Adelaide is also in course of construction. 

In conclusion, to show the marvellous results of electric telegraphy 
in the colony, one fact may be cited. Nineteen years ago Messrs. 
M*Gowan and Todd — the latter of whom has since carried a wire 
across Australia — ^in pressing, on the various Colonial Governments the 
necessity of extending the telegraph system to New South Wales and 
South Australia, showed how it would draw closer the relations which 
should exist between the principal Colonies, and was still more im- 
portant as being a step in the direction of one ultimate telegraphic con- 
nexion via India and England, " a scheme which, vast and difficult as 
it may appear, and really is, will, we doubt not, at no very distant day 
be carried out" Turning to the records, we find that during the first 
year of telegraphy in Victoria the number of words in press reports 
passing over the line was 1546. At 2 p.m. on the 21st July, 1875, 
orders were received fi'om the Telegraph Department to place the 
Argus newspaper in circuit with Adelaide in contemplation of 
the arrival of the English mail steamer. Circuit was completed 
at 5.30 p.m., and at 8 p.m. the operators at each end commenced 
work. By a quarter to 4 a.m. nearly 20,000 words, filling four- 
teen columns of that morning's paper, had been received and set in 
the composing-room. These comprised the whole of the letters of the 
London correspondents, dated nth June, and a letter of a German cor- 
respondent. Thus a full and complete summary of European intelli- 
gence was published at least thirty-six hours before the mail steamer 
could be expected to reach Hobson's Bay, and two clear da)^ in 
advance of the time at which the paper could have been published had 
the arrival of the steamer been waited for as usual. Since then a still 
longer telegram has been received and published by the same office- 
Comment would be superfluous : the rival claims of the automatic or 
other systems of telegraphy may very well be left for discussion to the 
Victorian Telegraph Society or the columns of the London TeUgraph 
JoumcUy but the astonishing feat named above stands at present un- 
equalled in Australia. 

Mr. Charles Todd has been worthily decorated by Her Majesty for 
his distinguished services in carrying a line across the island continent 
of Australia from Adelaide ; but there is little doubt the Superintendent 
of Victorian Telegraphs — Mr. M*Gk)wan — must have felt an equal thrill 
of satisfaction when receiving the first "throufi;h" message firom the Old 
World 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 



191 



The FOLLOWING ARE THE STATISTICS OP BUSINESS FROM 1854 TO 1874, 

INCLUSIVE. 



Year. 


Cash Revenue. 


Charge for Govern- 
ment Telegrams. 


No. of Govern- 
ment Telegrams. 


Toul Number 
of Telegrams. 




£ s. 


d. 


£ s. d. 






1854 ... 


223 2 


7 


1,037 5 


1,570 


3,869 


1855 •• 


3,162 13 


II 


3,074 II 8 


2,559 


12,241 


1856 ... 


3,225 13 


5 


2,422 2 3 


2,685 


13.174 


1857 ... 


10,024 16 


10 


3,023 12 2 


6,628 


60,058 


1858 ... 


16,474 17 


10 


10,126 15 10 


17,834 


131,486 


1859 ... 


25,249 17 





21,301 8 7 


31,699 


197,320 


i860 ... 


24,955 18 


2 


21,270 12 2 


49,918 


167,872 


1861 ... 


25,217 5 


4 


8,566 13 II 


40,818 


184,688 


1862 ... 


26,834 19 


8 


15,466 9 


49,038 


211,685 


1863 ... 


25,768 15 


8 


18,289 8 2 


78,038 


234,520 


1864 ... 


30,601 17 


II 


14,375 12 


71,939 


256,380 


1865 ... 


35,767 17 


4 


11,546 19 3 


68,946 


279,741 


1866 ... 


36,178 17 


4 


12,899 16 


63,506 


277,787 


1867 ... 


29,148 12 


2 


6,588 18 


59,887 


235,648 


1868 ... 


31,058 6 


8 


9,916 I II 


57,047 


276,677 


1869 ... 


34,ii$3 


5 


10,460 10 7 


57,966 


277,132 


1870 ... 


33,145 10 


4 


5,996 12 9 


60,634 


454,598 


1871 ... 


36,941 17 


I 


5,247 4 


63.877 


537,398 


1872 ... 


42,617 17 


3 


7,029 II 9 


85,645 


639,960 


1873 ... 


45,322 17 


5 


9,056 7 7 


124,319 


718,167 


1874 ... 


42,825 9 


7 


9,055 I 4 


121,285 


701,080 




558,930 3 


II 


206,750 17 5 


1,115,838 


5,871,481 



Showing a total of 149 Stations or Offices; 3,387]^ miles of line, provided with 

4,399 miles of wire. 

IMPLEMENTS OF PRECISION AND APPARATUS OF 

PHYSICAL RESEARCH, &c 

The extent to which implements of this kind are manufactured in the 
country is not great At the University, at the Observatory, and at the 
Technological Museum, skilled implement makers are employed repairing 
and altering instruments, and making new ones, or new parts, as circum- 
stances demand. In the trade a few skilled men are similarly employed, 
and among the new articles made by them may be enumerated tele- 
scopes and microscopes, barometers and thermometers in great variety, 
hydrometers and saccharometers, &a Of these some of the portions 
are usually imported. At one time and another instruments of con- 
siderable delicacy have been produced in the country, and there are 
men in our community quite capable of making them, but they can be 
imported more cheaply than they can be made. 

Of imported instruments we have a great many in use. The follow- 
ing are the most important of those in use at the Observatory: — 

1. Transit Circle. Diameter, 4 feet; focal length, 6 feet 

2. Great Melbourne Telescope. Cassepain construction; large 
mirror, 4 feet in diameter: focal length, 30^ feet; small mirror, 8 inches 
in diameter: focal length, 74 feet 7 inches. 



192 CATALOGUE OF THE 

3. South Equatorial Telescope, 8-inch aperture, 9 feet focal length. 

4. North Equatorial Telescope, 4j^-inch aperture, 5 feet focal length. 

5. Newtonian Reflector, 12 inches diameter, 8 feet focal length. 

6. Altazimuth, 2^-mch aperture, 29 inches focal length. 

7. Zenith Sector, not used; no dimensions given. 

8. Anemograph, or self-recording wind-gauge. 

9. Barograph, for recording height of barometer. 

10. Thermographs (2), for recording temperature shown by dry and 
wet bulb thermometers. 

11. Magnetic Theodolite. 

Also, seven astronomical clocks, seven box chronometers, and the 
usual barometers, thermometers, rain-gauges, &c. 

At a great many stations throughout the country meteorological obser- 
vations are made and recorded, the results being forwarded periodically 
to the Government Astronomer, and by him formulated and published for 
the information of the public. At these stations there are barometers, 
thermometers, rain-gauges, etc. Similar instruments are also placed at 
our seaports for general information and guidance. Our Department of 
Customs and Excise is provided with the necessary apparatus for the 
examination of spirits and wine, and our Government Anal5rtical Chemist 
has a complete laboratory provided with all the necessary apparatus. 
In the Departments of Public Lands, of Water Supply, and of Public 
Works, there are also beautiful instruments in use. At the Melbourne 
branch of the Royal Mint there are many instruments of great beauty 
and nicety. In the assaying room there is a balance that weighs to the 
thousandth part of a grain, its load being 10 grains. There is also a 
physical balance, of which the load is 2 lb., which weighs to the him- 
dredth part of a grain. This is provided with an apparatus first intro- 
duced by Gauss, but improved upon by Mr. Foord, of the Mint, for 
shifting the body being weighed from one end of the beam to the other 
without opening the glass case in which the whole apparatus is enclosed. 
The apparatus used for assaying silver by the humid method, as intro- 
duced by Guy Lussac, has been improved upon in our establishment, 
and is now highly complete and effective. There are many other beauti- 
ful instruments and machines in the Mint, but they do not differ from 
similar machines in use elsewhere. Our Microscopical Society has given 
a great impetus to the kind of inquiries to which it devotes itself, and 
the use of the microscope is now very common in this country both by 
professional and amateur investigators. Most of these have been im- 
ported, but some have been made in the colony. The most costly have 
a magnifying power of 500 diameters, and sell for about 50 guineas. When 
the Transit of Venus was coming due, there was a considerable demand for 
telescopes, and these were manufactured in numbers in Melbourne and 
exported to the other Australian colonies and to New Zealand. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, &c. 

There are no chronometers made in the country, but a great many 
are repaired and timed. The latter duty is sometimes performed at 
the Observatory, but oftener in private establishments. Watches have 



INTEBCOLONIAL KXHiBITJOIT, 1875. 193 

been made in the country, but rather as an experiment than in the way 
of business, as they can be imported at a cheaper rate. Turret clocks 
are made, however, as these have generally to be specially planned 
with a view to the requirements of the position they are intended to 
occupy. A very fine specimen of this kind of timekeeper is the clock 
at the General Post-office. It was designed by Mr. Ellery the 
Government Astronomer, and manufactured in the Government Railway 
workshops. It chimes quarters on three melodious bells. It is on the 
dead beat projection, and an excellent timekeeper. It is regulated 
from the Observatory by electric current. Eveiy day a time-ball is 
dropped by the same means, for the information of ships' officers clock- 
makers, &c Our railway clocks and other public timekeepers are also 
so regulated. Turret clocks are made in Melbourne up to 3 feet dial 
and at a cost, with strike movement, bells, &c,, up to ^300. Hall and 
office clocks are also made in the city in considerable numbers A 
cromoscope in the present Exhibition, made in Melbourne, is a very fine 
piece of work. ^ - 

WEIGHTS, MEASURES, AND COINS. 

The weights and measures used in Victoria are the same as are used 
in the United Kingdom, from which standards have been obtained at 
different times, duly authenticated. These are in charge of different 
departments of the Government and of other ruling bodies Some are 
at the Observatory, others at the Mint, and others in the possession of 
the City of Melbourne. One of the most important of our standard 
measures is a lo-feet base bar, which was used in the geodetic survey 
of the colony. ■' 

MOSAIC AND INLAID WORK. 

Mosaic was a term originally applied to the combination of cubes or 
veneers of various coloured stones in patterns; but it has long ceased' to 
be thus confined, and is now understood to include all kinds of inlaid 
and veneered work in every kind of material. 

The art of mosaic was known amongst the Greeks, and was exten- 
sively used amongst the Romans for flooring, and for the decoration of 
walls; the material ranging through all extremes, from tiles of earthen 
ware, to the costliest marbles, arranged generaJlyin geometric forms but 
frequently culmmating, towards the centre, in an elaborate picture ' An 
mcised ornament upon the surface of the marble, filkd with a cement 
of a contrasting colour, was also of frequent occurrence. In the same 
form and for the purpose of flooring the art has been practised do«-n to 
our own days, and is almost the only form in which it is known amongst us 
tessellated pavements in which the materials vary from the commonest J 

tiles to the most elaborate productions of Minton and of Cov^tiOm^^^KM 
being common for the paving of halls, verandahs, &c. i'<'-^|^^^^^^h 

In true mosaic work the whole of the surface is embedded Jfflj^^^^^^ 
or 'veneered into, a back ground of baser material; of this sort 8 



194 CATALOGUE OF THE 

the Venetian, sometimes also called the Byzantine mo^c, speci- 
mens of which, for the purpose of personal adornment, are common 
in our jewellers' shops; Roman mosaic, in which the tesserae 
are composed of thin slips of glass, is essentially a work of 
fine, and at the same time most patient art Such also is 
the Indian mosaic so common as a decoration on workboxes, card- 
boxes, cribba^e boards, fans, and the like; the material in this in- 
stance being ivory, a white metal, and a pale green opaque stone. A 
form of mosaic extensively used in Russia for wall and surface decora- 
tion might not inappropriately be practised amongst us, as the material, 
malachite, is produced in the neighbouring colony of South Australia. 
In this the forms are not geometric, the art being to arrange the pieces 
so as to run the dark green contour lines of one piece into those of 
another, producing an effect not unlike the intricate markings of knotted 
wood. 

Florentine mosaic, the pietra dura of the Italians, can also be seen in 
our jewellers' shops, worked up into articles of personal adornment. In 
this form of the art the groundwork is a thin slab of marble, generally 
black, on which the pattern to be wrought, generally foliage, flowers, or 
insects, is outlined, and then chased out to a depth of about the fortieth 
of an inch. Into these depressions the inlaying material, already polished 
and finished, is worked to the required shape by the ordinary processes 
of gem-cutting. The stones generally used are the pseudo gems, such 
as varieties of quartz, agate, jasper, lapis lazuli, chalcedons and cornelian, 
and these are worked to that exquisite degree of nicety that in good 
specimens the joints cannot be detected by the naked eye, for the 
depressions are not fitted simply with one piece, a petal of a flower, for 
instance, being simulated by perhaps half a dozen different pieces 
changing the colour by the most exquisite gradations. 

A variety of the Florentine mosaic, both in detail of manufacture and 
similarity of design, has been acclimatised in Derbyshire, where the 
manufacture was fostered by the late Duke of Devonshire, who placed 
his fine collection of Florentine work at the disposal of the native artists 
for the purposes of study. In lieu, however, of the hard stone, which 
can only be cut by the lapidary, the Derbyshire mosaic is inlaid with 
the native spar and marbles, shell, glass, cement, &c. On account of its 
comparatively low price it is frequently palmed off on the inexperienced 
as real Florentine. 

Of late years Glass mosaic, in imitation of the old Venetian work, has 
been reintroduced, and has been extensively used in lai^e works at the 
South Kensington Museum under the direction of Dr. Salviatl 

Marquetry is that form of mosaic in which the effect is produced by 
woods of different colours, and was first used as early as the fourteenth 
century by the Italians, amongst whom it was known as tassia work. 
By them it was chiefly applied to the decoration of furniture. At first 
the attempts in this direction of art were confined to the production of 
a white pattern on a black ground, the process being almost identical 
with that described for Florentine mosaic, the material being generally 
ebony for the groundwork, whilst the figures were worked in a white wood, 
sometimes in ivory. Simple as this was, by force of contrast of colour, 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 195 

by artistic design^ aftd by precision of pattern, this primitive marquetry 
became a very efficient decoration. 

By the beginning of the fifteenth century, however, the process had 
undergone a marked change; the whole surface was covered with a 
mosaic of wood, and its artists had succeeded, by the use of penetrating 
oil and of colours boiled in water, in staining the wood with tints suffi- 
ciently varied to indicate the foliage of trees, the clearness of water, and 
even those gradations of tint which produce the effect of distance, and 
at a still later period the brilliant tints of fruits and flowers were repro- 
duced. The introduction of stained wood was, however, always looked 
upon as somewhat irregular, and within the last century there has been a 
decided return to that development of the art which seeks to produce its 
effect by the employment of woods in their natural colours, and which 
frames its designs on a geometric pattern. 

Immediately connected with marquetry is the process of parquetry, 
which, designed upon the same principle, is carried out on altogether a 
bolder scale. Like marquetry, it is of foreign growth, but has of late 
years been introduced into England, where it is now much used, par- 
quetry floors being supplied at a price not much greater per superficial 
yard than a good Brussels carpet. Parquetry is always constructed on a 
geometric pattern, in some instances only one wood being used, whilst in 
others as many as four, or even five, are introduced. In those patterns 
where only one kind of wood is applied, the design depends for 
a portion of its effect on the sharply defined outline of the tesserae, 
which are so placed that the grain of wood appears to interlace. 

The manufacture of parquetry is one of the mechanical arts which 
ought to find a home amongst us, as parquetry floors are admirably 
suited to the climate, whilst no better material could be found than some 
of our colonial woods, properly seasoned. 

Buhl is another process of marquetry in which the metals, generally 
the gilt bronze known as ormolu, are inlaid upon grounds of tortoise- 
shell or ebony, and vice versa. This work took its name from two French 
cabinetmakers — father and son — ^who designed most of the furniture at 
Versailles. 

The present Exhibition will be found rich in inlaid woods, in conse- 
quence of the magnificent specimens exhibited in the Japanese Court, in 
which the inlaying is rich with those specimens of harmonious composi- 
tion which seem to result from the very abandonment of design, but 
which are really the result of an intuitive perception of some of the most 
subtle laws of composition, of proportion, and of balance of parts. 

A beautiful form of inlaying applied to small articles, in which the in- 
laying, or rather veneering, is coloured straw, will also be found in the 
Japanese Court, and will be found well worthy of attentive study, the 
patterns being most effective, and the colouring rich and at the same 
time harmonious. 

DECORATION AND FURNISHING OF INTERIORS OF 
DWELLINGS AND OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

The subject of interior decoration and furnishing has so wide a range, 
that it would be perfectly impracticable, within the limits of a volume 

o2 



196 CATALOGUE OF THE 

such as this, to do more than sketch the rise and progress of the ti^'O 
kindred arts, so that it would be but idle labour which should attempt to 
deal exhaustively with them in an essay of a few pages. The task, how- 
ever, is considerably lightened when, leaving furniture to the place into 
which it more properly falls (Jury 14), our attention is simply confined 
to interior decoration as it is known and practised amongst ourselves, and 
to a few of the essential rules which should determine its application. 

Before proceeding further, however, it is necessary to keep sight of one 
or two important principles. These are — that to be beautiful, an object 
must fitly answer the purpose for which it has been designed; thatutilit}' 
must precede beauty; that all true decoration is the decoration of con- 
structive necessities only, and that no one material should attempt to 
arrive at a result which can only be perfectly done by another. 

The ordinary basis of all internal decoration of a high class in the 
present day is stone or wood, and of these the modes of treatment are 
as various and as manifold as the applications of art Leaving behind us, 
then, the nobly framed, moulded, and carved ceilings of an Elizabethan 
mansion, or the earlier use of wood for wainscoating, as being almost 
obsolete, and as having been displaced for all work except that of the 
very highest order by plaster, which is, we might say, the base of all inter- 
nal decoration as practised amongst us, we propose to confine our remarks 
wholly to that material, simply premising that the rules of harmonious 
colouring, the laws of contrast and of surface ornament, are equally 
applicable to wall-papers. 

The art of making a smooth surface on walls by plaster was not only 
known to the Greeks and Romans, but was practised by the latter people 
in Britain. The art, however, appears to have been lost during the dark 
ages, to reappear amongst the mediaeval architects both in England and 
on the Continent of Europe about the twelfth century. Its operations are, 
however, so well known that a description of them here may well be 
spared. In that portion of the plasterer^s work which falls within our 
province, the decorative portion, the basis of the whole is sulphate of 
lime, or gypsum — whether simply burned and slacked in the same manner 
as ordinary lime, in which state it is known as Plaster-of-Paris ; or com- 
bined during certain stages of its manufacture with borax, in which case 
it is known as Parian; or with alum, in which case it forms Keene's 
Cement, the last being the material chiefly in use for highly-finished 
plaster-work amongst us. 

This is scarcely the place in which to go into the oft-debated question 
of the use or misuse of plaster. To borrow the words of one of the 
principal architects of the age. Sir G. G. Scott, "no material has either so 
sinned, or been sinned against." It has, however, its legitimate use as a 
vehicle for art, namely, to cover plain surface, or surface broken with 
incised ornament depending for effect on artistic outline, or surface 
diapered in low relief It passes beyond a legitimate use when on either 
wall or ceiling it simulates a construction in either stone or wood. But 
in this, which has been characterised as an age of shams, the use of 
plaster has been too deeply engrained in our buUding system as a vehicle 
for ornament to be easily got rid of, so that perhaps the best thing to do 



CCTEBCOLONIAL EXHIRITIOX, 1S75. 197 

is to suggest the means by which it can be rendered e£kctive» and most 
readily made to serve as the ground for the labour of the decorati^^ 
ardst, to whose work we now pass. 

The simplest and most mechanical form of the work of the House 
DecoratcMT is that known as paperhanging. Its more advanced form is 
such wall decoration as that of the large Hall and the Rotunda of this 
Exhibition, each being the work of different artists, but guided by the 
same principles; the most pronounced form of the art amongst us 
being the decoration of the large room of the Melbourne Totiti Hall. 
This style of internal decoration has only been revived of late years, 
and has in some instances been carried to extravagant extremes, as was 
but natural when it is remembered that it is but the reaction from the 
theory which considered the classic form so coinplete that the extension 
of colour was a direct departure from good taste. In its better 
development the style may be said to have been popularised by the late 
Mr. Owen Jones, and like all that is true and genuine in art it readily 
adapted itself to every variety of style, being equally effective in connection 
with the most severe classic, as with the most elastic Gothic, the 
character and form of the ornament alone being altered. The harmony 
of the colouring being founded on the laws of nature, like these laws 
survives every change of style, adorning and beautifying all. The two 
essentials of the style are involved in beautiful form of flat-painted 
decoration, and harmonious colouring. There is generally a conventional 
method of representing a botanical form like the Grecian honeysuckle, 
or a rigidly mechanical form like the Grecian feet, in monotone, or in gold, 
so that it relies for its effect on grace of outline rather than on the beauty 
which is derived from the blending of colours, or from the effects of light 
and shade. In choosing tlie form, preference should be given to tliose 
figures which consist of two corresponding halves on each side of a 
vertical centre, and those intended for vertical surfaces should have a 
distinct top and bottom, or right side upwards; whilst for a horizontal 
surface the principal ornament should consist of members radiating from 
a common centre. 

The principles which govern harmonious colouring are as old as the 
hills, and although they come intuitively to some natures, so that we find 
their results amongst the ornaments of the most savage tribes as in the art 
of the most cultivated nations, they are really founded on the most rigid 
and exact laws. Colour has its source in light, for by the decomj)osition 
of light we obtain colour, which science tells us exists in light in the pro- 
portions of 3 of yellow to 5 of red, and to 8 of blue, and all systems 
of colouring, whether worked out in the primaries, the secondaries, or 
the tertiaries, or in some of the multitudinous compounds of which they 
are capable, are harmonious only in so far as they preserve the three 
primary colours in these relative proportions. 

However, harmony does not necessarily exclude contrast, and some of 
the most artistic effects in surface decorations are the result of bold, nay 
almost daring contrasts of colour, but so applied as not to destroy the 
harmonious balance of the whole composition. The laws of contrast, 
however, are but imperfectly understood, and a few of the golden 



198 CATALOGUE OF THE 

maxims relating to it promulgated by the great master of .this develop- 
ment of art may not inappropriately close this essay :— 

"When ornaments in a colour are on a ground of a contrasting colour^ 
the ornament should be separated from the ground by an edging of 
lighter colour — as a red flower on a green ground should have an edging 
of lighter red. 

"When ornaments in a colour are on a gold ground, the ornaments 
should be separated from the ground by an edging of a darker colour. 

"Gold ornaments on any coloured ground should be outlined with 
black. 

"Ornaments of any colour may be separated from grounds of any 
other colour by edgings of white, gold, or black. 

"Ornaments in any colour, or in gold, may be used on white or black 
grounds,, without outline or edging. 

"In f self-tints,^ tones, or shades of tilie same colour, a light tint on a 
dark ground may be used without outline ; but a dark ornament on a 
light ground requires to be outlined with a still darker tint." 



Group 59. 

JOHN I. BLEASDALE, REV., D.D., St. Patrick's Cathedral, 

Melbourne. 

2796a Olives, as prepared by the Portuguese peasantry for food. Pre- 
pared by exhibitor. 

RULE, W. J. & M., 26 Simpson-street, East Melbourne. 

2797 Kinder Garten. This exhibit consists of several requisite occu- 

pations and playthings used in educating children accord- 
ing to FrobeFs method, the object of which is to substitute 
for the ordinary irksomeness of dry school-learning pleasing 
and instructive occupations tending to develop the latent 
capacities of the infantine mind, and to divert its powers 
into channels morally and intellectually beneficial to the 
child. 

2798 Fretwork Cabinet, worked in Huon-pine by Wilhelmina J. Rule. 

WEST, RICHARD, 20 High-street, St. Kilda. 

2799 Leather Cricket Balls. 



Group 60. 

CALVERT, WILLIAM, 87 Litde Collins-street East, Melbourne. 

2800 Australian Children's Picture Books. The process of printing the 

same in colours will be shown, and tne books sold during 
the Exhibition. 

COOK, JOHN, T. C, 113 Swanston-street, Melbourne. 

2801 The Lord's Prayer, in fifty systems of Shorthand. 



INTERCOLONIAL fiXHlblTIOK, 1875. 199 

FROST, J. p., Cambridge Lodge, Gmttan^street, Prahrftn. 

2802 Dr, Dodd's Sermon on Malt, printed and arranjfed in fanciful 

forms, characteristic of the subject. 

HARRY, EWIN C, Walker-street East, Northcoto. 

2803 Alphabet of 100 Systems of Shorthand, from Tiro, b.o. 80, to 

De Staines, a.d. 1839. 

2804 The Lord's Prayer, in twenty five systems of Shorthand. 

INSPECTOR-GENERAL OF PENAL ESTABLISHMENTS, 

King'-street, Melbourne. 

2805 Manuscript Books, demy, fcap. and post, assorted sizes. 

2806 Three Scarf Pins. 

2807 Three Bone Rings. 

2808 Four Book Marks. 

2809 Four Paper Knives. 

JAMES, D. J., 94 Gertrude-street, Pitzroy. 
(Non-competitive.) 

2810 American Family Bibles, illustrated, with heavy emboMsed 

covers. 

KREITMEYER, ExMILY ANN, Waxworks, Bonrke^t, Melbourne. 
2810a Two Vols. New Testament, illustrated, published in 1059. 

LOWE, J. E, Skating Rink, Stephen-street, Melbourne. 

2811 Money Tables, to fiicilitate the picking iiji of small coin at pay 

windows. 

NICHOLSON & ASCHERBERG, 21 Collins-street J^ast, 3IeUx)urne. 
2811a Portfolio of Music. 

ROBERTS, J. iL, Hea<l Teacher, Liut^jn. 

2812 ''The Arithmetic Book Superset! e/L" From t\m may }Mi of>- 

tained 2490 set* of an entirely djii'<;reiit feum for ea<;h 
scholar. Any numlxfr of mim» may f>e given and proved 
by an instantaneoujs method. 

RICHARDS, TH03I AS, E-^^., Government Printer, Sydney, SM>,W. 

Collection of Bookfc Bou^d at the Government Pnnting-oflioe, 

Svdnev, N.S.W.; — 

2812-/ GovCTnment (razaxte, I, 2, 3, 4, 

^ Lietter§ of Re^«trat!on of Inventions. 

3 Statutee. I, 2, fJ, 4, ^x 

4 Censw, 1^71. 

o Blue B'-jok aiid Statistical Jiegist^r, 1 ^r-j* 

*j Orcliids of Auttm-isc 

7 ParliamentarT HaiidVx^L 

5 IiiduitriaJ ProvT»5bfe. 
9 MaTfrTfrhrh — ^feix/tt- 



200 CATALOGUE OF THE 

2S12-10 Minerals and Rocks— Krefft. 

11 Report Council of Education, 1, 2, 3, 4 (1870). 

12 Meteorological Results, 1873. 

13 Snakes of Australia — Krefft 

14 Isaiah — Rae. 

15 Transactions Royal Society, 3, 4 (1872). 

16 Cash Books. 

17 Ledger. 

VICTORIAN ASYLUM AND SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND, 

Melbourne. 

2813 Reading Books. 

2814 Alston's Type. 

2815 Moon's „ 

2816 Braille's „ 

2817 Lucas' „ 

2818 Frere's „ 

2819 Writing Desk, Alstons system. 

2820 Writing Frame, Braille's system. 

2821 Specimens of Writing, in Alston's and Braille's systems. 

2822 Arithmetical Frame and Type. 

2823 Basket Work, Mats, Nets, Sewing and Fancy Work, Brushes, 

&c.y manufactured by the Bund. 

WESTERN AUSTRALIA, GOVERNMENT OF. 

2824 Statistics of Western Australia, 

WHITE, J. E., Melbourne. 
2824a Ancient Flemish Book. 

WILSON, ANDREW, 168 Gertrude-street, Fitzroy. 
2824b Mercantile Directory of the World. 



Group 61. 

BANNISTER, MILLIGAN & CO., Murchison-street, Carlton. 
2825 Universal Advertiser by Ornamental Tablets, for use in railway 
carriages, steamships, omnibuses, commercial rooms, &a 

BANK OF VICTORIA, Collins-street East, Melbourne ; General 

Manager, John Matheson, Esq. 
2825a Reports of the Bank of Victoria. 
2825b Specimens of Bank Notes, &c., framed. 

COMMERCIAL BANK OF AUSTRALIA (Limited), Melbourne; 

H. G. Turner, Esq., General Manager. 
2825c Specimens of Bank Notes, and Statistics of the Bank. 

GREGORY, G. F., 96 Cremome-street, Richmond. 
2825d Plan of a Clipper Passenger Ship, combining speed, economy, 
and comfort, showing the longitudinal section, also the 
transverse section, with fiill description. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 201 

NEW NORTH CLUNES COMPANY, Clunes; John Lewis, Mining 

Engineer and Manager. 
2626 Plan and Statistics of the N "'^orth Clunes Mine. 



Group v . 

POSTMASTER-GENERAL, Victoiia. 

2827 Wheatstone's Alphabetical Dial Telegraph Instruments, each 

consisting of communicator, indicator, and belL 

2828 Two Sets Morse Telegraph Instruments. Siemen Bros.' manu- 

factiQ-e. Fii-st class, each consisting of one register, one 
relay, one single key, and local batteiy. , 



Group 63. 

GAUNT, THOS., Royal Arcade, 1 4 Bourke-street East, Melbourne. 

2829 Gaunt's Improved Astronomical Telescope Stand, with divided 

circles to 360, having coarse and fine adjustments. . The 
improvements of this Stand are that the fine adjustments 
are never thrown out of gear when the coai^se adjustments 
are required. The telescope is 5 feet focus, 4^ inches 
diameter. 

2830 Compound Microscope Stand, mechanical stage, | inches rect- 

angular dii-ection, coarse and fine adjustments. 

2831 Best Students* Micix)scope Stand, with lever stage, coarse and 

fine adjustments. 

2832 Gaunt's Improved Educational Micix)scope, complete. 

2833 Microscopic Sundries. 

2834 Fitzi'oy Barometers. 

2835 Gaunt's Improved Aneroid. 



Group 64. 

PEARSON, C. K., Moorabool-street, Geelong. 
2837 Skeleton Barometer. 



Group 65. 

PITTARD, GEORGE, 93 Little Collins-street East, Melbourne. 

2837a Platform Weighing Machine, weighing from ^Ib. to 12 cwt 
2837b Platform Weighing Machine, weighing from 2oz, to 6201b. 
2837c Patent Compound Lever Steelyard, weighing ' from ^Ib. to 

6201b. 
2837d Patent Single Lever Steelyard, weighing from 2oz. to 1501b. 
2837E Pair of Butcher's Beam Scales. 

RIDDLE, THOS. COSBY, Elizabeth-street, Geelong. 

2838 The Debts of the World, and the Best Way to Pay Them. 



202 catalogue oj* the 

Geoup 66. 

DAVIS, MISS E. J., 12 Wangaratta-street, Richmond. 

2839 Ancient Copper Coins, 

2840 Ancient Silver Coins. 

ROBERTS, MRS. A. B., 13 Wan^ratta-street, Richmond. 

2841 Japanese Gold 10-dollar Piece. 

2842 Ancient Delf Jug, 110 years old, modelled in honour of 

Shakespeare. 

WELCH, HENRY P., Ashbourne, Toorak. 
2842a Gold, Silver, and Copper Coins, Japanese, Siamese, Cingalese, 
Chinese, Continental, and English. 

ZOOLOGICAL AND ACCLIMATISATION SOCIETY OF 
VICTORIA ; Albert A. C. Le Souef, Hon. Secretary. 

2842b Diploma of Honour awarded to the Acclimatisation Society of 
Victoria at the Vienna Exhibition on behalf of the Wine- 
growers of Victoria. 

Group 67. 

GAUNT, T., Royal Arcade, 14 Bourke-street East, Melbourne. 

2843 Gentleman's Gold Three-quarter-plate Colonial-made Compensation 

Lever Watch : by T. Gaunt. 

2844 Small Eight-day Compensation Lever Timepiece. 

2845 Eight-day Railway-station Clock, 3 feet dial, Huon-pine case : by 

T. Gaunt. 

JOSEPH BROTHERS, 11 Swans ton-street, Melbourne. 

2846 Astronomical Clock. 

2847 Electro Motor Clock. 

2848 Electric Clocks. 

2849 Sympathetic Clocks. 

2850 System of Electric Clocks for Railways. 

2851 Ink-recording Chronograph, for timing races. 

2852 Horological Appliances. 

PARTRIDGE, JOHN, 75 Sandridge-road, Emerald Hill. 

2853 Sympathetic Electric Clock. 

THITCHENER, H. T., Brunswick-street, Fitzroy. 

2854 Clock, in colonial-manufactured case, the movement imported, 

but colonial-finished. 

WHITNEY, CHAMBERS & CO., Swanston-street, Melbourne. 

(Non-competitive). 

2855 Clock, on marble stand, with bronze figure and mountings. 



Group 71. 

ALFRED HOSPITAL, COMMITTEE OF, Melbourne; Fenry Tate, 

Secretary. 
2856 The Alfred Hospital. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBIITON, 1 87 5. 20S 

BROWNE, GEORGE, 29 Queen-atreet, Melbourne. 

2857 Architecturd Drawings, " Street Architecture." 

WEHRS, GUSTAV A., Townsville. 

2858 Plan of Municipality of Townsville. 



Group 72. 

HEATHCOTE, THOS. S., 88 Drummond-street, Carlton. 

2861 Specimens of Painted Imitations of Woods. • 

ROBERTS, SAMUEL H., 1G5 Swans ton^street. 

2862 Decoration of the Walls of Rotunda, in tempered border and 

cornices in Grecian style. 



DEPARTMENT 23. 
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 



EXPERTS. 



Eugene Ascherberg, Esq. | Julius Budclee, Esq. 

William Blazey, Esq. | Jolin Hill, Esq., Chairman. 



Australia is yet too young to possess any annals of manufacture of 
musical instruments in great variety. As yet colonists must be content 
to listen to the dulcet sounds of harmony drawn from instruments the 
work of old-world manufacturers, and must wait in patience for the 
time when musical instrument making shall become a colonial industry. 
In the matter of organ building and pianoforte making Victoria has, 
however, made some progress. P'or the production of Organs there are 
two factories. The aggregate number of hands employed by one of them 
is II. The value of the plant and machinery is set down at ;i{^i2oo, 
the land at ^500, and the buildings in which the business is carried on 
at ^^500. The men average 11 s. per day, and boys, of whom there 
are four employed, 2s. 6d- per day. 

Of Pianoforte makers there are 9 in Victoria, who employ 42 hands. The 
machinery and plant is valued at ^1375, the land at jC^S9S9 ^^^ ^^^ build- 
ings at j^28oo. The aggregate wholesale value of the manufactures pro- 
duced in 1874 may be set down at about from ^8000 to jiCgooo, The 
laigest of these manufactories gives emplovTnent to 15 hands, viz., 10 
men, i woman, and 4 young per^ions, who earn for 8 hours' work per 
day — ^mcDy jQS'f '^'oman, j£i; young persons, los. per week- The 
wholesale value of the goods manufactured in 1874 was jCsJoo. 
.\nother manufacturer emplo}ing 4 men estimates the wholesale value of 



204 CATALOGUE OF THE 

the work turned out of his establishment last year to be ;£^iooo. The 
exhibits in this class — 27 in number — will be found worthy of notice, as 
illustrating the progress made and perfection arrived at in a compara- 
tively few years by those who follow this industry. Amongst the ex- 
hibits is a dulciana trichord, full compass, with metal string-plates, and 
manufactured entirely from colonial timber. 

Amongst the exhibits will be found two Violins of colonial manufacture, 
the one a copy of a Stradivarius, and the other made upon a model in- 
vented by the exhibitor. This manufacturer has obtained a name 
amongst the musical profession for his violins, and without wishing to 
institute comparisons between the Victorian articles and the old-world 
Cremonas, it n^y be said that the Victorian violins have a good tone, 
and, judging from one which has been played upon often in public, that 
the artistic effects of the performer's skill can be well reproduced by 
these instruments. 



Group 73. 

DOW, WILLIAM H., 11 Church-street, Emerald Hill. 

2863 Stradivarius' Varnished Violin. 

2864 Own Model Unvarnished Violin. 

FINCHAM, GEORGE, Bridge-road, Richmond. 

2865 Organ, of Colonial manufacture. 

GILMOUR, RICHARD, Swamp-road, Footscray. 

2866 Musical Instrument (Bagpipes). 

KILNER, JOSEPH, Bosisto-street, Richmond. 

2867 Pianoforte. Dulciana trichord instrument, full compass, with 

metal string plates, ivory-fronted keys, with perfect check 
repeater action, built on the soundest scientific theories, 
tone dolest Manufactured entirely from colonial timber. 

2868 Pianoforte, 5| octave, termed the Study and Travelling Piano. 

1 richord, metal spring plates, cneck action, solid case, 
celest pedals. Colonial manufacture. 

2869 Pianoforte. Semi-cottage, malleable plates and bridges, brass 

down bearings, trichord throughout, repeater check action, 
gradion keys, carved trusses, patent celest pedals, solid 
front. Manufactured expressly for extreme climates. Colo- 
nial manufacture; Kauri pine sound-board. 

2870 Pianoforte. Full cottage, trichord throughout, three pedals, 

full metal plates, extended sound-board of Kauri pine, 
improved bass bridge, patent perfect repeater, check action, 
ivory-fronted keys, oval key pins, with the latest improve- 
ments. Colonial manufacture. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 205 

MATHEWS, W., 80 Clarendon-street, Emerald Hill 

2871 Pianofortes. 

• 

NICHOLSON & ASCHERBERG, 21 CoUins-street East, Melbourne. 

(Non-competitive). 

2872 Boudoir Iron Grand Oblique Pianoforte, by Hagspiel and 

Ruschpler, Dresden. Obtained first prize at the Vienna 
Exhibition. Constructed on the well-known Steinwaj 
principle. The main features of this instrument are — 
improved mechanism, distinguished by power, precision in 
the action of the hammers, and expression. Extraordinary 
volume and richness of tone, equal to a Concert Grand, 
without requiring much more space than a Cottage Piano. 
Improved and simplified action, springs crossed to save 
room. Metallic frame-work, with five iron bars. J*^acility 
, of touch, combined with best quality and fulness of tone. 

2873 Cottage Pianoforte, trichord, manufactured at Dresden, by » 

Emil Ascherberg, especially for Nicholson and Ascherberg, 
warranted to withstand extreme climates. 

2874 Cottage Piano, do. do. 

2875 Portfolio of Music, exhibitors' own publications. 

O'MALLEY, REV. JOSEPH (S.J.), St. Patrick's College, Melbourne. 

2876 Music Board, intended to explain the elements of music, and to 

teach singing and hai-mony. 

WEATHERILL, THOMAS, Campbell-parade, Richmond. 

2877 Pianos. 



DEPARTMENT 24. 

AGRICULTURAL, MINING, CIVIL, INDUSTRIAL 
AND RAILWAY ENGINEERING, CONSTRUC- 
TION OF METALLURGICAL ESTABLISH- 
MENTS, MODELS, PLANS, &c. 

EXPERTS. 



C. F. Creswell, Esq., 

Chairman. 
William Elsdon, Esq. 



Josiah Mitchell, Esq. 
T. E. Rawlinson, Esti. 



Robert Watson, Es 



Hon. John Woods, M. P. 



•^sq. 

,M.: 



It must be sufficiently obvious that preliminary essays, of even the 
slightest texture, on the various branches of engineering science, 
gi'ouped together in this juiy, could not be written within any reason- 
able amount of space available for the pui-pose, so that the usual coui-se 
has here to be departed from; but although we have special departments 
of the State, whose duty it should be to keep themselves and the public 
acquainted with the latest development of agriculture, mining, civil, and 



206 - CATALOGUE OF THE 

railway engineering, yet not a jingle exhibit, in this, jury ^ any rate, 
indicates that such departments are even in existence ; in addition to 
which, the entries made by the general public are so meagre that thei-e 
are not even the materials at hand by which a brief general review of 
the present state of engineering sdenee amongst us might be illustrated. 
Under these circumstances, attention may not inappropriately be directed 
to the models illustrating some of those groups which, being the pro- 
perty of the Trustees of the Melbourne Public library, are amongst the 
pei«manent exhibits of the Technological Museum. Thus in Grroup 80 
will be found a very beautiful series of agricultural models, consisting 
of portable engines, threshing-machines, ploughs, harrows, &c, which, 
though at first sight apparently toys, are constructed in precisely the 
same manner^ with the same material, and with the same number of 
parts as the originals. In Group 81 will be found an almost complete 
series of models, drawings, patterns, and samples of the various appli- 
ances, tools and material used in mining, illustrating all its operations, 
and all its different systems from the moment of breaking ground, until 
the metal is turned out as a marketable commodity; with various other 
models showing the different methods of securing the shaft, of timbering 
and supporting the drives, various methods of pumping, of applying 
motive power, methods of facilitating the ascent and descent of the 
workmen, models of rock-boring machines and other exhibits too nume- 
rous to mention, the whole giving an amount of practical informatiou 
which it would be hard to find so plainly and lucidly set befoi'e the 
inquirer by any other method. Illustrating Group 82 will be found 
one or two models of bridges which deserve and will repay attention. 



Group 74. 

PERRY BROTHERS, Fulham Grange Nurseries, Alphington, and 

68 Collins-street West, Melbourne. 

2877a Horticultural Display. 



Group 76. 

BURN, WILLIAM, Punt-road, Richmond. 

2878 Model of the River from Princes Bridge to the Falls Bridge, 

showing the artificial stoppages which cause the floods in 
the Upper Yarra. 

MURRAY, JOHN, Melbourne. 

2879 Model of Culvert (in stone;. 



INTERCOLONIAL. EXHIBITION, 1875. 207 



DEPARTMENT 26. 
FINE ARTS. 



Hon. T. T. A'Beckett, 

MX-C, Chairman. 
Dr. John Blair. 



EXPERTS. 

O. R. Campbell, Esq. 
Hubert de Castella, Esq. 
William Johnson, Esq. 



Johnson Hicks Esq. 
J. A. Panton, Esq., P.M. 
K. Twentyman, Esq. 



But: comparatively a few years have elapsed since Australian Art emerged 
from its swaddling clothes. The first stage of its progress has been as 
marvellously rapid as the growth of the magic shrub germinating from 
the tiny seed sown by the cunning hand of the Oriental juggler, 'i'he 
promise which the efforts of infancy, bold in their crudeness, artistic in - 
their very simplicity, gave of blossoming into the talent of adolescence, 
has been fulfiiled, and anew a promise of the true genius of mature 
manhood is held out Australian Art can as yet be scarcely .said to 
possess a history^ but it can fairly lay claim to a distinctive character of 
its own. Public taste, too, has been steadily undergoing a course of art 
educatiorL The Xarionai Gallery was the pnmer out of which a great pro- 
portion of Victorians were first initiated into the mysteries of the artistic 
alphabet, while the collections that love of art or the spirit of speculation 
have tempted private individuals to accumulate, have l>een the lesson 
books by which tlie course has been further continued. 7 hese first stages 
in the way of Icnowledg-e iiave been highly benericial. A just appreciation 
of natures wonders, human in-iagination and arti.stic ideality has l'>een 
awakened; admiration for the beauties of art has been engendered, 
and art patrons have become a reality. Thus p'^l>uc taste rias aided 
Victoriaji art in its straggles to emancipate itseii trom prehistoric dark- 
nesSy and tiie liberality of patrons lias stmiu la ted its devotees to that per- 
severance and study witliout which even heaven-ocjrn genius can achieve 
b-it a compannvely small success. 

The exhibitions under die auspices of the Victorian Academy of 
Arts have also been most benenciaL Artists Iiave entered into a 
friendly comperlnon widi brother artists, and Ijv exhii^iting their works 
c^^e challenged crincisiTu This in itself is an advantage, as it 
samulaces eniuiation, and calls attenrxon to the beauties and defects of 
t.ie works of each individual painter. Art cnncism Iiere is, however, in 
i::3 intincy. and cndcs are too prone to deal in generalities, to refer 
to the old masters, and to dip too deeply into the pages of Pilkiiit^ton ; 
OS a rale, every brown-faced \fadonna or dusky-nued i^ggar-'>oy is 
in their eyes a Afunllo, a pallid biueish-compLexioned saint a dtudo; 
dark inscmtaoie pictures relieved by dabs of tlie palette knite here and 
there are dignihed as bearing the impress of :he genuis of r^aivitor 
Rosa; who other than Hondykoter couid have put ^-hase dainty toucluts 
into tiie mtfled feathers ot* that group of domestic fowls : every "oattle- 
'cenc in which a white horse is prominent is set down as a Wo iveniian's ; 



1208 CATALOGUE OF THE 

every glowing sunset is a Turner, and every canvas upon which the 
varied aspects of the sea are depicted is assumed to be a Melby. There 
is far too much reliance placed upon these landmarks of painting, and 
critics have yet to spring up who, with every veneration for byegone works 
of art and masters of other countries, will be content to criticise Victorian 
artists upon their own individual merits. This is wanting, but such criti- 
cism as we have is better than none at all, and has been productive of 

good results. 

Amongst the ranks of Victorian artists in oils, M. Buvelot stands 
unrivalled as 2i paysagiste. He follows closely the footsteps of a school 
adopted by two modem compatriots, who, however, are little known out 
of France. As delineators of French scenery, the names of Millet and 
Corot have become as familiar as household words in the country that 
gave them birth. The beauties and eccentricities of nature, the novelty 
of atmospheric effects, the gloriously-blended tints of summer time, and 
the calm grey tone of winter have been wonderfully depicted by these 
two artists. And what they have done for France M. Buvelot is doing 
for Victoria. Nature is the fount from whence he draws his inspiration. 
Amidst the towering gums of the Australian forest, he finds material for 
his canvas ; the bush track, the winding creek, the tortuous Yarra, the 
rugged slopes of basaltic hills are reproduced with unerring faithfulness 
and skill, surrounded with the halo of Nature's realistic poetry that gives 
to his pictures life and soul. How faithfully is depicted the knarled 
giant of the forest It could not be mistaken for anything but one of 
the tribe of the Australian Eucalypti. How wonderfully, too, has the 
changing colour of the bluegum been caught ! What Victorian meeting 
with "The Water-hole at C'oleraine" in a far-off land would not pick it 
out at once amidst thousands of paintings as a pure bit of Australian 
scenery, to be looked at for hours, and in which the longer looked at new 
beauties, new distinctive characteristics, of Victorian scenery and wood- 
land effect are to be discovered. M. Buvelot excels, too, in the manner 
in which he treats the luminous atmosphere of Australia. The soft trans- 
parent mist that hangs about his *' Summer's Morning," and his winter 
effects, bespeak the artist and the true student of nature. 

M. Eugene von Guerard is a most painstaking artist, given, it is 
true, to a pre-Raphaelistic precision in detail, which detracts from the 
undoubted merits of his paintings. The coast scenery, the hills and 
plains of Australia have been in them faithfully represented. 

Apother aspirant for fame as a delineator of Australian scenery is Mr. 
Isaac Whitehead, who, during the last three or four years, has made 
wonderful progress, and may now be said to be most successful in repro- 
ducing upon canvas the distinctive features of the scenery he pourtrays. 
A -^xoXific paysagisie is Mr. H. L. Van den Houten, whose performances 
are most unequal. Many of his bush scenes have, however, the impress 
of a close adherence to nature. Mr. T. Wright is another delineator of 
Victorian scenery who is well known and is appreciated as he deserves. 
Careless he is at times, but at times he rises to excellency. Mr. H. J. 
Johnstone is decidedly a rising artist, and if it be considered how compara- 
tively short is the time since he first began to exhibit, it must be con- 
ceded that he made great progress. Mr. Johnstone combines delicacy 



ISTEMCOUXKIAL KXHmnOK, TS75. ^0^ 

of toacfa with a true eye for colour, and is very felicitous in reproducing the 
charactenstics of Austrahan scenerv. XIr. J. W. Curtis deddedlv has 
ment, bat his pictures are generally too sombre to find many admirers. 
He is the Australian Jericault, and although his pictures do not present 
the honors of " Death on the Raft.'' they are tinged with a melancholy 
and unifonn tint of coldness and desolation that are sometimes worked 
up with really ardstic effect 

It is to be deplored that an almost total absence of figure painting 
exists in Victoria. Mr. Chester Earles is the only artist in oils who 
may be said to paint figures. His heads of women, while being well 
painted, betray a faulty conception of the character he meant to pour- 
tray. This was noticesibly so in his ** Beatrice" and *' Katherine." One 
missed the flashing yet maidenly eyes, the pouting lips, and the scornful 
brow of the vivacious coquette, that made such havoc with poor Be- 
nedict, just as are missed the characteristic traits of the shrewish 
"Kate." As artists who deserve to be mentioned in connection with 
Victoria, are Mr. Wm. Ford and the Misses Li\dngstone and Pilking- 
ton. These two ladies are the best copyists that we have. It may 
not be quite fair to claim Mr. Gully as a Victorian artist, but certainly 
he is appreciated here and belongs to Australia. As a water-colourist he 
stands pre-eminent in this quarter of the globe. His subjects are all taken 
from New Zealand, and certainly he has been most happy in reproducing 
the boldand imposing scenery of that colony. Mrs. George Parsons is a 
water-colourist of no mean merit This lady possesses a boldness and 
dash of treatment, and it is quite refi-eshing to see the effects she brings 
out with her broad washes after the insignificant stippeling employed by 
the majority of artists. 

The Schools at the National Gallery possess pupils who give promise 
of talent, and some of the woris^ of those who are studying from the 
round and devoting themselves to anatomical drawing points to a 
decided progress in this branch of art 

Lithography in all its branches, viewed as a fine art, finds a home in 
Victoria, and the specimens that are exhibited will prove to what per- 
fection it has been brought here. 

The representative of the Plastic Art is Mr. M*Kennal, who, as a 
modeller, has executed' a variety of works in a truly artistic manner. 
His "Horses of Phaeton" is a production that at once stamps him as an 
ai tist Sculpture is not well represented. However, in the Exhibition 
will be found a marble figure of " Prayer," the figure and the marble 
fi*om which the statue and pedestal are cut being sculptured and manu- 
factured in the colony. 

The art of Illumination has also its representative in the person of 
Mr. R. Shepherd, who possesses originality of design, an artistic touch, 
and an eye for the harmony of colours. We stand in wonderment over 
the decorations of middle-age missals, and grow enthusiastic over the 
excellence of monkish skill in the art of illuminating, but at the same 
tiine an inspection of the works of modem artists such as Mr. Shepherd 
will afford proof that illumination, if not now so much in vogue as in the 
times of early Christianity is still an art that has not fallen into 
oblivion. 



210 CATALOGUE OF THE 

The science of Photography has of late years made rapid strides from 
an art point of view, and our local photographers have kept pace with the 
times. The photographs taken by Mr. Noone, of the Crown Lands Office, 
are choice specimens of the art The ateliers of Messrs. Johnstone and 
O'Shannessy, Mayall, Batchelder, Chuck, and Botteril, have made names 
for them in portraiture, whether plain photographs, or tinted, or coloured 
in oils. Landscape scenery and architecture are felicitously handled 
by Mr. Nettleton, whose latest achievement has been the reproduction 
by photography of various pictures in the National Gallery by the order 
of the trustees. The work has been well executed, and the result is a 
decided triumph for photography, as the means of obtaining a me- 
mento of the art, and disseminating a knowledge of the art treasures we 
possess. 

Amongst the objects of Miscellaneous Art which will, no doubt, attract 
notice, are carved wood, frames of leather composed of grapes, fruits, and 
flowers, cases of stuffed birds and fancy work in feathers, wax and wool, 
and other exhibits, which will be found duly chronicled in the Catalogue. 



Gkoup 80. 

BROWNE, M. A., 39 Smith-street, Fitzroy. 

2880 Marble Cross. 

BRUCE & CO., Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 
(Non-competitive.) 

2881 Imitations of Wood Carving, executed by machinery. 

CAMPBELL, 0. R., Punt^road, Windsor. 

2882 Model of the Seal of the Public Library of Melbourne. 

2883 „ Medal for the Intercolonial Exhibition of 1872. 

2884 „ Medal for the Intercolonial Exhibition of 1875. 

CARRE, THOS. DOMEC, George-street, East Melbourne. 

2885 Wood Carving — ^The Sabines, Romulus, and Tatius. 

2886 Brackets, with Heads and Centre Pieces. 

COLE, HON. GEO. WARD, Bay-street, Brighton. 

2887 Bronze Medallion of Charles J. Latrobe, Esq., C.B., by Thomas 

Woolner, Esq. 

2888 Bronze Medallion of Commander George Ward Cole, by Thos. 

Woolner, Esq. 

2889 Medallion of a Child, by Thomas Woolner, Esq. 

GERARD, E. N., 7 Palmerston-place, Carlton. 

2890 Group of " Last Words of Marmion," W. Scott. 

2891 Figure of *.* Faith." 

2892 „ "Hope." 

2893 „ "Charity." 

Modelled by exhibitor. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 211 

PALLET, FRANCOIS, Pension Suisse, Lonsdale-street, Melbourne. 

2893a ''The Three Ages," a Group of Flowers sculptured in hardest 
Sicilian marbk. 

HOGARTH, JULIUS, 51 Brighton-street, East Richmond. 

2894 Impressions of Medals, executed by exhibitor. 

2895 Medals presented to exhibitor in Paris, Denmark, and Australia. 

2896 Samples of Figure Modelling. 

HUENERBEIN, A. C, 87 Russell-street, Melbourne. 
2896a Statues on Fountain. 

HUXLEY, PARKER & CO., Russell-street, Melbourne. 

2897 Marble Figure of "Prayer," entirely sculptured in the colony by 

James Gilbert 

NUTT, T. W., Stephenson-street, Richmond. 

2898 Plaster Relievos, in medallion and panel. Portraiture, Ideal 

Heads, Figures, &c. 

2899 Brackets. 

2900 Drawing for Medallion of Australia. 

2901 Busts. 

PERUGIA, ANTONIO, 202 Stephen-street, Melbourne. 

2902 Statuary, "Sacred Heart." 

2903 „ "Virgin aad Child." 

2904 „ " Virgin €f Conception." 

PHILLIPS, WILLIAM, Neil-street, Carlton. 

2905 Marble Figure. 

TAYLOR, B. B., 51 Toorak-road, South Yarra. 

2906 Pompeian Fragments. 



Group 81. 

A'BECKETT, THE HON. THOS. T., Brighton. 

(Non-competitive.) 

2907 "Creepers, Cape Shanck," Chevalier. 

2908 "St. Mark's Church, Venice," Canaletti. 

2909 "Doge's Palace, Venice," by Canaletti. 

2910 "Source of the Wannon," E. Von Guerard. 

2911 "Fern Tree Gully," E. Von Guerard. 

2912 " Emerald Hill and Sandridge from Government Domain (1857)," 

T. Clark. 

PS 



214 CATALOGUE OF THB 

2994 "Girl with Flowers,'' Unknown. 

2995 "Sketch of Porch, Rouen Cathedral," Houghton. 

2996 "Street Scene in Rouen/' Houghton. 

2997 "Landscape," Glover. 

2998 "Landscape," Glover. 

2999 "Interior'^ in Sepia, Unknown. 

3000 "River Landscape," Butler. 

3001 "Fruit," Cousins. 

3002 "View from Studley Park," Cousins. 

3003 "View in the Highlands of Scotland," Davies. 

3004 "Sea Piece," Knell. 

3005 "View of Red Bluff, St. Kilda," Davies. 

3006 "Squall Coming On," Le Copell. 

3007 "Landscape," Glover. 

3008 "Red Deer in the Highlands," Davies. 

3009 ''View in Tasmania," Beauchamp. 

3010 "French Peasant," Fred. Goodall. 

301 1 " Study of Trees," Coplev Fielding. 

3012 "Hunting Scene," Woodhouse. 

3013 "St. Wulfren Cathedral, Abbeville, France," Gritten. 

3014 "Scene in Tasmania," Glover. 

3015 "Interior of a Highland Cottage," Unknown. 

3016 "Sketch, Highland Pony and Scotch Terrier," Sidney Cooper. 

3017 " Edinburgh, from Craig Muller Castle," Unknown. 

3018 " Scene in Tasmania," J. Jefferson, Comedian. 

3019 "Channel Steam Packet," Unknown. 

3020 "English Landscape," Harry Williams. 

3021 "Tickled with a Straw," Unknown. 

3022 "Otira Gorge, New Zealand," Cousins. 

3023 "Corra Lynn Bridge on the Esk, Tasmania," J. Jefferson, 

Comedian. 

3024 "View on the Coast," Unknown. 

3025 " Group of Fishermen," Unknown. 

3026 "Lake Scene in Wales," Crayon, Bowman. 

BOWMAN, J. S., 31 Russell-street, Melbourne. 

3027 *<View in Melbourne," Crayon, Miss Riddell. 

3028 "Loch Awe, Scotland," „* „ 

3029 "At the Stile," Oil Painting, „ 

3030 ^f View on the Avon," Crayon, Miss A. Riddell. 

3031 "Macallum's Creek," 

3032 "The Deep Creek," Oil Painting, 

3033 "Oyster Bay, Tasmania," Crayon, Miss Stephen. 

3034 "On St. Kilda Beach," „ ,, 

3035 "View on the Yarra," „ Miss Harvey. 

3036 "View on the Yarra," „ „ 

3037 "View on the Glenelg" „ „ 

3038 "View from Majorca,^ „ „ 

3039 "Vignette of the Sisters," „ Miss Baillic. 

3040 "View on South Coast of Tasmania," „ Miss Simson. 






jy » 



9J 
>7 



DTTEBCOIXMriAI. KKHIBITIOX, 1S75. 215 

3041 ''Fall on the WaIl«sntla^'' Cnyon, Miss S. Siinsoxi 

3042 "A Gap in the Alps," „ Miss Hatton. 

3043 "Geelong Beach," „ 

3044 «The Last Attempt," „ Miss E, Hutton, 

3045 " View on Black's River," „ Miss Mnrrav. 

3046 "A Cliff on the Tnron," „ Miss Burrows, 

3047 ''View on the Macalister," „ Miss A, Murrav, 

3048 "The Road to the Knoh, OU Painting, Miss Waugh, 

3049 "View on the Yarra," Crayon, Miss RobU, 

3050 "View on the Moorahool," „ Miss Andrew. 

3051 "View near Toorak," Oil Painting, 

3052 "The Knob in the Alps," Crayon, Miss Bowman. 

3053 "OntheYarra," 

3054 "View near Elephant Bridge," Oil Sketch. 

3055 "Mouth of Gardiner's Creek," „ 

3056 "Portrait Study," 

3057 "Portrait Study,"* 

3058 "A Pool in the Otway Ranges," Crayon, F. Straw. 

3059 '^Louttit Bay," Oil Painting, „ 

3060 " Devil's Kitchen, Pi^:oreet," Crayon, „ 

3061 "Newcastle Heads," „ G. H. Teague. 

3062 « Ferry on the YaiTa," „ T. Lorimer. 

3063 "Lagoon in Survey Paddock," „ W. Baillie. 

3064 "Two-mile HiU," „ J. A. Robertson. 

3065 "A Valley in Gippsland," „ R. Moorhead. 

3066 "Snow Scene,'' „ E. Armitage. 

3067 "The Plains," „ G. Young. 

3068 "View in Switzerland" „ Mrs. Capt Price. 

3069 "Tarbert, Invernessshire" „ „ 

3070 "In the Alps," „ Miss Adams. 
3070a " Gully in the Alps," by F. J. S. 

3070b "View in the Bay," Jessie Simpson, of Waverley. 

3070c "On the Derwent," Miss Andrew. 

3070d "Near Walhalla," Miss Murray. 

3070E "Sunset," J. S. Bowman. 

3070p "View in Bushy Park," J. S. Bowman. 

3070G "On the Murray," Miss Lucas. 

3070H "On the Blackall Creek," Miss Webb. 

30701 "Crackenback Creek," by S. H. 

3070J " Black's River," J. S. Bowman. 

3070k " Loch Lomond," Miss Blair. 

3070L " Loch Goyle,'^ Mrs. J. S. Bowman. 

BLYTHE, MISS E., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3071 Flower Paintings from Nature, "Autumn Leaves," painted by 

exhibitor. 

3072 "Mount Wellington," in water colours, painted by exhibitor. 

3073 "Cape Honeysuckle, or Protea Flower," painted by exhibitor. 



216 CATALOGUE OF THE 

BOGLE, ANDREW, 21 Flinders-street East, Melbourne. 

3074 "Edinburgh 100 Years Ago." 

BROWNE, M. A., 39 Smith-street, Fitzroy. 

3075 Specimens of Oriental Painting on Copper. 

BULLEN, M., Woolton, Northcote. 

3076 "Caught at Last." 

3077 ^'Beliona, Bianca and Black Bess." 

3078 " On the Merri Creek at Woolton." 

BRYANT, EDWIN, Artist, Sandhurst. 

3079 Two Pencil Drawings. 

BUVELOT, L., 13 George-street, Fitzroy. 

3080 "At Point Nepean." 

3081 "Gisborne Hills from Mount Macedon." 

3082 " At Fernshaw." 

m 

CAMPBELL, M. A., Punt-rpad, Windsor. 

3083 "View at Mount Macedon.'' 

CAMPBELL, MISS AMY, Punt-road, Windsor. 
3085 "St. Kilda Beach." 

CAMPBELL, 0. R., Punt-road, Windsor. 

3087 "Crossing the Plains." 

CHATTERTON, T., Pascoe Vale road, Moonee Ponds. 

(Non-competitive). 

3088 " Staff of Life," by Whittle. 

CHUN PANG CHEAH YENG, Artist, 6 Beehive Chambers, 

Elizabeth street, Melbourne. 

3088a Portrait of Mark' Last King, Esq. 

3088b „ Lady, both painted by exhibitor. 

CARSE, J. H., Waverley, N.S.W. 

3089 " Creek Scene, Tilba Tilba," oil painting. 

3090 "Wallaga Lake, near Bega, N.S.W." - 

CLARK, DANIEL, Artist, Warrnambool. 
3090a "Tower Hill." 

COLE, THE HON. GEO. WARD, Bay-street, Brighton. 

3091 "Portrait of Edward Ward,'* by Sir Joshua Re vn olds. 

3092 "Water Colour Sketch of St Ninian's, Victoria," by Ed. fiateman. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 217 

COLVILLE, H., 256 Smith-street, Fitzroy. 

3093 "Highland Courtship." 

CURTIS, J. W., Bourke-street East, Melbourne. 

3094 Oil Painting. Three subjects from Longfellow's *' Ballad of 

Carwithan." 

EARNSHAW, ANN, Reed-street North, Fitzroy. 

3095 Scripture Piece, in Berlin wool work. 

EDWARDS, WILLIAM, 299 Albert-road, Emerald-hill. 

(Non-competitive). 

3096 "Calais Harbour, Storm Approaching." 

3097 "Flemish Interiors," by Si Von Breer. 
3097a ' 

3098 "Christ Crucified," Unknown. '' 

3099 " Oil Painting," by Thiers. 
3099a „ by Constable. 

3100 "Landscape," Hardwick. 

3101 "A View near the Tower," by Stanfield. 
3101a "Bagpiper," Unknown. 

3101b "The Jewel Case,'' Unknown. 
3101c Portrait, "Lady," Unknown. 
3101D Portrait, "Lady," by F. Fry. 

EVANS, G. F., Hobaiij Town, Tasmania. 

3102 Oil Painting, "English Landscape," from an original picture by 

Constable, painted by exhibitor. 

FITZPATRICK, J., D.D., THE VERY REV. VICAR GENERAL, 

Melbourne. 

(Non-competitive). 

3102a^ "St. Jerome," Lanfranc. 

3102b" "The Return from Egypt," Unknown. 

FLETCHER, V., Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

(Non-competitive). 

3103 "Falls of the Wannon," BuveloU 

3104 "Landscape," Unknown. 

3105 "Sea Piece," Melby. 

3106 "Sea Piece," Melby. 

3107 "Fish," J. L. Rolfe. 

3107a "Schnapper Point," E. Von Guerard. 

3107b "Landscape," S. H. Baker. 

3107c „ „ 

3107d "Scene in North Wales," Peter Deaken. 

3107b "Mount Torlesx, N.Z.," Hon. J. C. Richmond. 



218 CATALOGUE OP THE 

FLINTOFP, THOMAS, Bourke-street East, Melbourne. 

3108 "Portrait of Professor Wilson ," T. Flintoff. 

3109 "Portrait of R. L. J. EUery, Esq.," T. Flintoff. 

3110 "The Bride," T. Flintoff. 

3111 "Portrait of Mr. T. Flintoff," T. Flintoff 

FORD, DR. F. T. W., 107 Collins-street East, Melbourne. 

3112 Oil Painting. 

FULLER, S. P., Ralston-street, South Yarra. 

3113 "Lady of the Lake." 
31 U "Broadham.*' 

GALAQHER, S. F., 39 Smith-street, Fitzroy 
3119 "Group of Flowers," Oriental painting. 

GRAVES, J. W., Hobarfc Town, Tasmania. 
SI 20 Oil Painting, "Harvest Time," painted by exhibitor 

GRIFFITHS, MISS E., 32 Villiers-street, Hotham. 

3121 Woolwork Picture. 

HARRISON, GEORGE, Captain R.N., Melbourne Club. 

3122 Oil Painting, "Candlelight," Schalker. 

HULL, MRS. HUGH, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3123 Pencil Drawing, " Avoca by Moonlight." 

HULME, EDWARD, Millawa, Oxley. 

3124 "Landscape — Between the Lights." 

3125 "St Patrick's Cathedral, Melbourne— Moonlight." 

HURST, — , New Gisbome. 
3125a Portrait of a Gentleman. 

EAUL, A. A., 31 Collins-street East, Melbourne. 

3125a "Fruits and Flowers," by an Old Master. 

3125b Ivory Painting, "Lot and His Two Daughters," by C. Da Costft. 

LIVINGSTONE, M. H., 18 Napier-street, Fitzroy. 

3126 "Old Stack and Farmyard." 

3127 "The Hon. De La Poer Trench." 

3128 "The Sons of Dr. Haddon." 

LLOYD, GRANT H., New Norfolk, Tasmania. 

3129 "Sydney, from Vaucluse." 

3130 "Port Jackson Heads." 

3131 "Barrenjoey, at the mouth of the Hawkesbury." 

3132 "Peat's Ferry on the River Hawkesbury, by daylight." 

3133 " On the Derwent from Risden, Mount Wellington in the back- 

ground." 

3134 "Launoeston on the Tamar, with Ben Lomond in the distance. '^ 

All th^ above painted by exhibitor. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. dli> 

LONG, MARIA, Station-street, North Carlton. 

3135 Two Castles, Shell work. 

3136 Two Pictures, Shellwork, 

LTJOHMAN, J., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3137 "Scene on the River Derwent," in water colours, painted by the 

late T. E. Chapman. 

3138 Scene— "Falls on the River Derwent," in water colours, painted 

bj the late T. E. Chapman. 

3139 Scene in Water Colours — "Waterfall at Tolosa in Humphrey's 

Rivulet," painted by the late T. E. Chapman. 

3140 "Scenes in Devonshire," in water colours (3), painted by the late 

T. E. Chapman. 

McNeill, THOMAS H., 220 Bourke-street East, Melbourne. 
3U0a "Turtle Rock, Glenara." 

MEREDITH, MRS. CHARLES, Orford, Tasmania. 

3141 "White and Red Waratah Flowers of New South Wales." 

3142 "Group of Tasmanian Fish." 

Both painted by exhibitor. 

NUTTING, MISS E., Little Collins-street East, Melbourne. 

3143 Woolwork Picture. 

OAKDEN, PERCY, 91 Collins-street West, Melbourne. 

3144 "Interior View of St. Sophia, Constantinople," drawn by C. E. 

Marriott 

O'SULLIVAN, ALFRED PATRICK, South Yarra. 

3145 Picture of Ornamental Paper Work. 

PATERSON, C, Melbourne. 

3146 "Portrait," oil painting. 

PULLEN, A. R, Park-street, Sydney. 

Pictures from Still Life (four) — 

3147 "Globe," 

3148 "Apollo," 

3149 "Venus Pomona," in crayon. 

3150 "Tumbler of Water under Glass Shade." 



220 CATALOGUE OF THE 

PURVES, JAMES, Esq., Glen Isla, Richmond. 

(Non-competitive). 

ANTWERP. 

3151 "Descent from the Cross," Triptich, P. P. Rubens, wings 
painted on both sides. In front the Salutation of the Virgin 
and the Presentation in the Temple; at the back St. Chris- 
topher and the Infant Saviour and Hermit, copied from the 
original in Antwerp Cathedral, by P. Parasyn. 

SI 52 "Descent from the Cross," large size, P. P. Rubens. Triptich. 
Wings painted as in the other copy. Copied from the 
original, by F. A. Phillips. 

3153 "Elevation of the Cross," Triptich. P. P. Rubens. Wings 

painted on both sides, in continuation of the centre sub- 
ject, from the original in Antwerp Cathedral, by P. Farasyn. 

3154 " Assumption of the virgin," Altar Piece, P. P. Rubens. Copied 

from the original in Antwerp Cathedral. 

3155 "Card Players," Valentine. Copied from the original in the 

Gallery of Pictures at Antwerp, by P. Farasyn. 

3156 "Christ between Two Thieves,^' P. P. Rubens. "The 

genius of Rubens nowhere appears to more advantage than 
here^ it is the most carefully finished picture of all his 
worl^. The whole is conducted with the most consummate 
art." Copied from the original in the Qallery of Pictures at 
Antwerp, by F. A. Phillips. 

3157 "Adoration of tne Magi," P. P. Rubens. A large magnificent 

composition of nearly twenty figures in Rubens' best 
manner. 

3158 "Descent from the Cross," Vandyke. 

3159 "Entombment," Vandyke. 

VENICE. 

3160 "Peter Martyr," Titian. "By many thought to be the third 

picture in the world, c©ming after the * Transfiguration' 
of Raphael and the ^ Communion' of St. Jerome.'" Copied 
from tne original in the Church of Santi Giovanni e Paolo, 
better known as San Zanipolo, by Carlo Zatti, Calle delle 
Turchette, Venice. 

3161 "Martyrdom of SS. Marcus and Marcellinus," Paul Veronese. 

Copied from the original in Church of San Sebastian, by 
Carlo Zatti. 

3162 Original Picture, "The Three Ages," Carlo Zatti. 

QENOA. 

3163 "Rape of Proserpine," Correggio. 

3164 "Abraham," Correggio. 

3165 "Mercury Disarming Mars." 

3166 "Joseph Telling his Dream," Piallo. 

3167 "Christ and the Samaritan Woman," Bibera Spagnolette. 

3168 "Magdalen," Guido. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 221 

ROME. 

3169 "The Transfiguration," Raphael. "The last and greatest oil 

Eainting of this illustrious master. It was suspended over 
is corpse for public homage, while the last traces of his 
master-hand were yet visiole upon the canvas." Copied 
from the original in the Vatican oj Jacques Beltrami. 

3170 "The Communion of St Jerome," Domenichino. "This magnifi- 

cent work, the undoubted masterpiece of Domenichino, is 
generally considered second only to the 'Transfiguration' 
of Raphael." Copied from the original in the Vatican by 
Jacques Beltrami. 

3171 "Aurora," Guido. From the Rospilosi Palace on the Quirinal 

Hill. "One of the most celebrated frescoes in Rome.'' 
Copied from the original by Jacques Beltrami. 

3172 "Beatrice Cenci," Guido. Clopied from the original in the 

Barberini Palace by Jacques Beltrami. "One of the most 
celebrated portraits in Rome." 

3173 "Madonna col Bambino," Carlo Dolce. Painted from the 

original by Jacques Beltrami. 

3174 "Virgin and Child," Murillo. Painted from the original in the 

Corsini Palace by Jacques Beltrami. 

FLORENCB. 

3175 "Madonna della Seggiola/' Raphael. "The sweetest of all his 

Madonnas, if not the grandest." Painted from the original 
in the Pitti Palace by Tito Berti. 

3176 "Mary Magdalen," Carlo Dolce. Painted from the original in 

the Uffizi Gallery by Tito Berti. 

3177 "The Visitation of St. Elizabeth," Albertinelli. "It is ex- 

ceedingly fraught with feeling. The Virgin is the personi- 
fication of delicacy, modesty, and self-possession." Copied 
from the original in the Pitti Palace by Tito Berti. 

3178 "The Visitation of St. Elizabeth," Albertinelli. Copied from 

the original in the Pitti Palace by Jacques Farini. 

3179 "Madonna de San Francisco," Andrea del Sarto. "A very 

grand picture. One of the finest of the many grand works 
of this master." Copied from the original in the Uffizi 
Gallery by Jacques i arini. 

3180 "Ten Portraits of Old Masters," painted by themselves for the 

Uffizi Gallery. Copied from the originals by Tito Berti. 

3181 "Villa Medici," Claude. Copied from the original in the 

Uffizi Gallery by Tito Berti. 

3182 "Madonna," Carlo Dolce. From the Uffiizi Gallery. 

3183 "Virgin and Child," Murillo. Copied from the original in the 

Pitti Palace by Tito Berti. 

3184 "Angel (Head of)," Carlo Dolce. From the Gallery Ferroni. 

Copied from the original by Tito Berti. 

3185 "La Poesia," Carlo Dolce. In the Corsini Palace, Florence. 

3186 "Madonna," Ghirlandajo. Copied from the original in the 

Uffizi Gallery by Tito Berti. 



222 CATALOVE OP TKK 

3187 '^The Flight into Egypt/' Correggio. Copied from the original 

in the Uffizi Gallery by Tito Berti. 

3188 ^'Madonna of the Pomegranate/' Ghirlandajo. 

31 89 " Adoration/' Correggio. 

3190 " Allegory of Peace/' P. P. Ruhens. 

3191 " Virgin and Child/' A. Cana 

MODBRN PICTURES. 

3192 "Santa Maria della Salute, Venice," Bnrnet. 

3193 "Santa Maria della Salute" (smaller), Burnet. 

3194 "Old Bridge, Florence," Burnet. 

3195 "Grenada and Alhambra," Burnet 

3196 "Landscape and Cattle," Burnet 

3197 Six "Landscapes/* by T. Glover, Esq., late of Tasmania. 

3198 " Head of a Nun" (copy), Tasso Firrato. 

3199 Portrait 

3200 "Battle Scene." 

ROBERTS, J. H., Sturt-street, Ballarat 

3201 "Young Lady Sitting." 

3202 " Portrait of Young Lady." 

SCOTT, MISS ROSAMONDE, Royal Nurseries, Hawthorn. 

3203 "Point Nepean, from Queenscliff." 

3204 "Railway Bridge near Hawihom." 

SCURRY, J., 172 Lonsdale-street East, Melbourne. 

3205 "Hebe." 

SLOGGATT, WM., Malvern Hill. 

3206 ''After the Storm." 

SMITH, B. D., Auburn-road, Hawthorn, Melbourne. 

3207 "Return from Egypt" 

SMITH, L. L., M.D., 182 Collins-street East, Melbourne. 

(Non-competitive. ) 

3208 '*A Study," by Mosson. 

3209 "The Music Lesson," by Terbourg. 

SMITH, J. H., & SON, Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

3210 "Home Defenders." 

SOLLY, MRS. AMELIA, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3211 Water Colour Painting, "'Neath Castle Wales," painted by 

exhibitor. 

STEVENSON, THOMAS, Stirling House, Dudley-street, West 

Melbourne. 
3211a Specimens Armorial Paintings. 

STOCKS, ERNEST D., Mount Pleasant, Ballarat. 

3212 "View of Buninyong from Bowen." 



INTBBCOIiONIAL EXHIBITION, 1^75- 223 

STRELEIN, CHARLES, Lygon-street, Carlton. 

3213 Oil Painting, "Flowers." 

O^lOB yy yf 

TREVETT, RICHARD, 42 Faraday-street, Carlton, Melbourne. 

3214 Three Pictures in Berlin Wool. 

VAN DEN HOUTEN, C. A., Henry-street, Windsor. 

3215 "Study of Black and White Objects" in oil. 

3216 "Scene at Eltham," water colour. 

3217 "View of Melbourne from the Yarra/' water colour. 

3218 "Study from Still Life," water colour. 

VICTORIAN ACADEMY OF ARTS TF. B. Qibbes, Secretary), 

Albert-street, East Melbourne. 

OIL PAINTINGS. 

3219 " Elaine/' Chester Earles. 

3220 "Track off Point Nepean Road/' J. W. Curtis. 
3^21 "Summer Sunset," H. J. Johnstone. 

3222 "At the Hanging Rock,'' Wm. Ford. 

3223 "Evening/' John Paterson. 

3224 "View from Studley Park," E. W. Minchen. 

3225 "Trawell Brook/' Cyrus Mason. 

3226 "Tallarook Ranges," Cyrus Mason. 

3227 " Windermere, Tasmania," J. M. Nelson. 

3228 . " Waterfall, Devil's Elbow, N.S. W.," J, M. Nelson. 

3229 "An Old Road on the Range at Dromana," H. F.. Reilly. 

3230 "Evening at Macedon," J. Whitehead. 

3231 "Early Morning, Dandenong Ranges," J. Whitehead. 

3232 "In the Sassafras Valley, Dandenong State Forest," J. White- 

head. 

3233 "Near Broadford," J. Whitehead. 

3234 "Near Broadford," J. Whitehead. 

3235 "In a Surrey Lane/' Mrs. Parsons. 

3237 "Melbourne in 1837," H. L. Van den Houten. 

3238 "Scene from Yering towards Lilydale," H. L. Van den Houten. 

3239 "Scene at Berwick," H. L. Van den Houten. 

3241 " Andromeda," Chester Earles. 

WATER COLOURS. 

3242 "A Fancy Head/' Wm. Ford. 

3243 " On the Little River," John Paterson. 

3244 "Cottage on the Templestowe-road," Miss J. Rielly. 

3245 " The Yarra at Hawthorn Bridge/' Samuel Griffiths. 

3246 " Cattle," Samuel Griffiths. 



224 CATALOGUE OP THE 

3247 "Fruit," John Carter. 

3248 "On the Road to Dandenonp:," Mrs. Parsonp. 

3249 *^Summer at Avenel/' Mrs. Parsons. 

3250 "Basin, Camperdown," Alex. Webb. 

3251 ''View on Fiery Creek/' Alex. Webb. 

3252 "Sunset, Plenty Ranges," F. B. Gibbes. 

3253 "QueensclifF Lighthouse," F. B. Gibbes. 

3254 "View from St. Kilda," F. B. Gibbes. 

3255 "Heraldic Painting," C. Harper. 

3256 " Bust, in Plaster, of the late Dr. Greeves," J. T. Jones. 

3257 "Medallion Portrait of a French Lady,'* J. Scurry. 

3258 "Musidora," water-colour sketch, Samuel Calvert. 

/'And e'en a sense 
Of self-approving beauty stole across 
Her busy thought. " 

"Thomson's Seasons. "^ 

VOLUM, JAMES, Corio-street, Geelong. 
(Non-competitive. ) 

3259 "Pool of Bethesda," supposed to be by Paul Veronese. 

WALLACE, MISS, O'Connell-street, Hothara. 

3260 Woolwork Picture. Subject— " Suffer Little Children to Come 

unto Me." 

WALL AN, R. E., Weinberg-road, Hawthorn. 

3260a "Paul and Francisco." 
3260b "Leda and the Swan." 
3260c Print Proof. 

WALTON, E., Saffron-street, Chilwell, Geelong. 

(Non-competitive.) 

3261 "The Redeemer," Matt. c. iv., v. IL 

3262 "Trial by Jury." 

3263 "Young Archer." 

3264 "St. Peter at Prayer." 

WHITE, J. B., Lonsdale-street West, Melbourne. 

(Non-competitive.) 

3265 "Ecce Homo," Unknown. 

3266 "Cupids Decorating a Sphinx," Unknown. 

3267 " Dutch Peasants," Unknown. 

3268 "Sea Piece," Unknown. ■ 

WHITEHEAD, ISAAC, 87 Collins-street, Melbourne. 

3269 "Widow's Mite," bv Villard. 

3270 "Spring Morning,'^ by L Whitehead, 1874. 

3271 "Noon on the Yarra Flats," bv I. Whitehead, 1874. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. ^^^ 

3272 "Scenery at Cape Schank," by Chevalier. 

3273 "Castle Rock Cfape," by Chevalier. 

3274 "In the Dargo Valley,^ by Chevalier. 

WRIGHT, ANNIE, JeflTcott-street, West Melbourne. 

3275 Pictures, in Leatherwork Frames. 

WRIGHT, JOHN, Fitzgerald-street, South Yarra. 

3276 Picture in Woolwork and Floss, representing " Queen Mary 

Mourning over the dying Douglass at the Battle of Lang- 
side." 



Group 82. 

a'BECKETT, the HON. THOS. T., Brighton. 

3277 " Her Majesty Queen Victoria, as she appeared at her first visit 

to the Royal Italian Opera after her Accession, from a 
portrait by Parris." (Proof before letters). 

ALTMANN, E. A., Punt-road, Richmond. 

3278 Samples of Letter and other Engravings by an Amateur. 

BANNISTER, R. D., 48 Little Collins-street East, Melbourne. 
3278a Lithograph — "Sir James Paxton submitting the Plans of the 
Exhibition Buildings, in London, 1851, to Prince Albert." 

BARTLETT, SARAH, 162 Swan-street, Richmond. 

3279 A Pen and Ink Tablet of the History of Victoria from its Dis- 

covery down to the year 1860. Framed in colonial black- 
wood. 

CALVERT, SAMUEL, 87 Little Collins-street East, Melbourne. 

3280 Proof Specimens of Engraved Drawings on Wood. 

EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT OF VICTORIA. 

3280a Works of Art, consisting of Crayon and Pencil Drawings, pre- 
sented to the Education Department of Victoria by His 
Majesty the King of Italy. 

HENTY, AGNES B., Portland. 
3280b Four Pen and Ink Drawings. 

HULL, MRS. HUGH, Hobarfc Town, Tasmania. 

3281 Pencil Drawing, "Avoca by Moonlight.'' 

HUSS, EDWARD, 43 CoUinsngtreet East, Melbourne. 
3281a " Charles Bright, Esq.," pencil portrait. 
3281b Pencil Portrait. 

JOHNSON, GEO. R, Architect, 32 Collins-street West, Melbourne. 
3281c Designs for Public Buildings — Town Hall, Post and Telegi'apli 

Office, and Court House, Hotham. Design by exhibitor. 
3281d The Old Colonists' Homes — ^Alms Houses. Design by exhibitor. 
3281e New Law Courts. Design by exhibitor. 

Q 



226 CATALOGUE OF THE 

KELLY, T. A., Beehive Chambers, Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 

3282 Perspective View of Footscray Town Hall. 

3283 Design for Monument to Daniel O'Connell. 

3284 Church of the Immaculate Conception, Abbotsfosd. 

3285 Design for Bank of South Australia, Adelaide. 

KENNEDY, J. M., O'Shanassy-street, Hotham.. 

3286 Illuminated Address to His Excellency Sir G. P. Bowen. 

3287 " The Castle of Ischia," pencil drawing. 

MACKAY, JOHN, 295 Lygon-street, Carlton. 

3288 Seven Pen and Ink Drawings, Scripture subjects, illustrative of 

the Psalms. 

MCKENZIE, iENEAS, Electric Telegraph Office, Melbourne. 
3288a Pen and Ink Sketches. 

PEDRONCINNI, P., Fitzgibbon-street, Richmond. 

3289 Group of Leaves, representing the origin of the Corinthian 

Capital, in Indian ink. 
3289a Decorative Design. 

PRICE, FREDERICK, 69 Swanston-street, Melbourne. 

3290 Case of Engraved Views. 

3291 Case of Specimens of Lithography. 

RANDALL, A., C.E., Engineer to the Hobart Town Waterworks, 

Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3292 Chart of the Hobart Town Waterworks. 

TROEDEL, CHARLES, 43 Collins-street, Melbourne. 

3293 Specimens of Lithographed Show-cards, Labds, Music^titles, &c. 

TRENGROUSE, NICHOLAS, Sydney, New South Wales. 

3294 Lithographs (mounted on rollers) of Trengrotise's Pioneer Nar- 

row Railway, 1ft. 6in. gauge, with patent safety invention 
to prevent the possibility of trains overturning or in any 
way getting oif the line. This description of railway is 
suited to any country, and very moderate in cost, being 
only about £3000 (three thousand pounds) per mile. 

WHITTON, HARRY, Bank of Victoria, Melbourne. 
3294a Portrait of the Duke of Wellington, in Indian ink, by exhibitor. 

WINSTON & CO., 41 Swanston-street, Melbourne. 

3295 Proofs of Engravings on Wood. 



Group 84. 

ABORIGINES MISSION, GIPPSLAND ; F. A. Hagenauer, 

Missionary. 
(Non-competitive.) 
3296 Photographic View of the Ramahyuck Mission Station, showing 
its progress smee its foundation in 1863. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITIOX, 1^7 5* ^^^ 

ALCOCK, p. C, 41 SwanstoiiHstreet, Melbourne. 

3297 Kve Pboti^raphs. 

3298 Two Books. 

ATiFRED HOSPITAI^ COMMITTEE OF, Melbourne; Henry Tate, 

Secrelary. 

3299 The Alfred Hospital 

BALLY, H. H., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3300 Plate of Photc^raphic Bembrandt Portraits. 
3300a Book of Photographic Portraits. 

BATCHEIDER & CO., Collins-street East, Melbourne. 

3301 Specimens of Photographic Portraiture. 

BRAY, JAMES S., Esq., Telegraph Department, Sydney, N.S.W. 

3302 Photographs of Australian Insects. 

The insects contained in this collection have been collected and bred 
by the exhibitor, amongst which are very rare and valuable specimens 
of Lepidoptera. The collection consists of the following orders, viz. : — 
Coleoptera, Orthoptera, Neuroptera, Hymenoptera, Trichoptera, Strep- 
siptera, Hemiptera, Lepidoptera, and Diptera. 

BULL, H., Pitt-street, Sydney, New South Wales. 

3303 Photograph of Warehouse. 

CASTEAY, L. R, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 
3304. Photograph of Castray Esplanade, Hobart Town. 

CHUCK, T. F., Royal Arcade, Melbourne. 

3305 Frame of Portraits (Five), enlarged by the solar process from one 

inch to life size. 

3306 Historical Group of the Photographs of Explorers and Early 

Settlers of Victoria, dating from 1834 to 1842. 

CLARK, ELIZABETH C, 13 Bourke-street West, Melbourne. 

3307 Two Frames of Coloured Photographs. 

CLIFFORD, S., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3308 Two Books of Photographic Views in Tasmania, exhibited by the 

artist. 

COLAC SHIRE COUNCIL, Colac. 

3309 Photographs of the District of Colac. 

COLE, THE HON. GEO. WARD, Bay-street, Brighton. 

3310 Photograph. 

CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF HOBART TOWN. 
3310a Plate of Photographic Views of the City of Hobart Town. 

CRESWICK, BOROUGH COUNCIL OF, Creswick. 

3310b Photographic Views and Statistics. 

q2 



328 CATALOGUE OF THE 

DEGOTARDI, JOHN, Sydney. 

3311 Photo-mechanical Printinop. This process is partly the invention 

of exhibitor; and parlJy worked after Albert's process. For 
cheapness and simplicity of manipulation^ and also for 
perfect permanency^ this process stands unrivalled, bein^^ 
printed on a printing-press with printer's ink; requires no 
mounting or special preparation of the paper. 

EEMAN, R. A., 20 and 22 Lonsdale-street East, Melbourne. 

(Non-competitive.) 

3312 Photographic Views of Sculpture Hall ) Swedish National Mu- 
3213 „ „ Stairs J seum, Stockholm. 

3314 „ „ Stockholm, from the Pavilion of Horse- 

back Gardens. 

3315 „ yy Stockholm, from the Castle Island. 

3316 „ „ the Grand Hotel, Stockholm. 

3317 „ ,, the Castle, StockJiolm. 

3318 „ „ Square and Statue of Gustavus Adolphus. 

3319 „ „ Armour of Charles IX., father of Gus- 

tavus Adolphus. 

EMERALD HILL, BOROUGH COUNCIL OF. 
3319a Photographs of Emerald Hill. 

FRAZER, JOHN, & CO., Sydney, New South Wales. 

3320 Warehouse of C. Newton Bros, and Co. 

3321 „ Farmer and Co., Pitt-street. 

3322 „ Saber and Sons, York-street. 

3323 „ Hofihung and Co., Pitt-street. 

3324 Union Club, Bligh-street 

3325 „ „ 

3326 „ „ 

3327 New Club-house about to be erected. 

3328 Residence of John Frazer, Esq., Woolhara. 

3329 C. J. Roberts, Crown and Anchor Hotel, Geor&;«-street. 

3330 Sydney Meat Preserving Co.'s Works, Haslem^ creek. 

FREEMAN, GEORGE, Adelaide. 
3330a Photographs. 

HOTHAM TOWN COUNCIL ; C. E. Randall, Town Clerk. 

3331 Photographs of the Town of Hotham and Statistics. 

HULL, MRS. HUGH, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3332 Portrait of the last Tasmanian Aboriginal Man, "Billy Lanney," 

photographed from life by Charles Woolley. Framed in 
muskwood. 

3333 Portraits of Aboriginal Women, "Wapperty" and Patty." Photo- 

graphed from life by Charles Woolley. Framed in sheoak 
wood. 

3334 Portraits— "LaUa Rookh" and "Bessy Clarke." Photographeil 

from life by Charles Woolley. Fi-amed in myi-tlewood. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 8 75. 229 

JOHNSTONE, O'SH ANNESSY & CO., Bonrkc-street East, Melbourne 

3335 Photographs (plain), on porcelain, and finished in oil and water 

colours. 

KINROSS, Rev. M. A., Sydney. 

3336 Photographs of St Andrew's Presbyterian College. 

Ma)ONALD, D., High-street, St. Kilda. 

3337 Photographs. 

MAYALL, J. P., 81 Bourke-street East, Melbourne. 

3338 Life Size enlargement Bust of Miss E. L. Mayall, finished in 

Indian ink. 

3339 Views of the Premises of Messrs. W. H. Rocke, Detmold, 

Beauchamp, and the Bank of Victoria, Collins-street. 

MELBOURNE OBSERVATORY; J. Turner, Assistant Astronomer 

(Non-competitive) . 

3340 Enlarged Photograph of the Moon, taken with the great Mel- 

bourne Telescope, by J. Turner. 

MORRISON, L K, Elgin-street, Carlton, Melbourne. 

3341 Photographs of American Currency. 

NEWMAN, J. HUBERT, Oxford-street, Sydney. 

3342 Portrait 

3343 "Right Rev. Archbishop Vaughan." 

3344 "Mrs. Capt St John." 

3345 "Polly," direct from life. 

3346 "Dora," „ 

3347 "Portrait of Lady." 

3348 Vignettes. 

3349 Cabinets. 

3350 "Sir William Manning." 

3351 Portrait 

3352 "Representatives of the Australian Colonies at Conference, held 

in Sydney, 1873." 
3553 "Sir Hercules Robinson, K.C.B." 

3354 "Miss Robinson." 

3355 "The Right Rev. Bishop of Sydney." 

3356 "Miss Robinson." 

3357 "Hon. Lady Robinson." 

NETTLETON, CHARLES, 19 Madeline-street, Carlton. 

3358 Photographs. 

NEW NORTH CLUNES COMPANY, Clunes; John Lewis, Mining 

Engineer and Manager. 

3359 Plan and Statistics of the New North Clunes Mine. 

NOBLE, TIMOTHY, Bourkenstreet East, Melbourne. 

3360 Wall Case Photographs of Theatrical Celebrit^s, &c. 

3361 " The Chevalier Blondin, Hero of Niagara." 
3361a "Davies, the Champion Ventriloquist.'' 



230 CATALOGUE OF THE 

3361b ''Miss Clara Thompson/' 

3361c " Miss Jennie Winston/' 

336 Id "Mr. and Mrs. Williamson, 'Struck Oil.'" 

336l£ "His Excellency the Governor of Victoria,*' 

3361F "Miss Eleanor Carey." 

33610 "Mr. George Ireland." 
3361H "Miss Davies." 

33611 "Mr. George Coppin." 

NOONE, JOHN, Crqwn Lands Office, Melbourne. 

(Non-competitive.) 

3362 Photo^aphic Pictures of Indian Embroidery, Ancient and 

Modern. 

NORMAN, HARRIET, Mount Gambier, South Australia. 

3363 Specimens of Photography. 

3364 Specimens of Photographic Portraiture. 

NORTON, J., Market-square, Geelong. 

3365 Photographs of Scenery. 

PERRY, G. W., Bay-street, Sandridge. 

3366 Frame of Photographs. 

PRAHRAN TOWN COUNCIL. 

3367 Photographs of Prahran. 

PUBLIC WORKS, INSPECTOR-GENERAL OF, Melbourne. 
3367a Photograph of Graving Dock, Williamstown. 

RICHARDS, THOMAS, Government Printer, Sydney, N.S.W. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF BUILDINGS IN AND AROUND SYDNEY, NEW SOUTH 

WALES. 

3368 "Sydney in 1803," copied from M. Perouse's "Voyage de 

D^couvertes aux Terres Australes." 

3369 " Sydney in 1873." 

3370 "Government House (showing porch)." 

3371 "Government House." 

3372 *^The Treasury," Macouarie-street North. 

3373 "Registrar-General's Office," Elizaheth-street. 

3374 "Australian Museum," College-street 

3375 "Free Public Library," Bent and Macquarie streets. 

3376 "Post-office," George-street. 

3377 " Government Printing Office.'' 

3378 " Observatory," Flagstaff Hill. 

3379 "Victoria Barracks (Men's Quarters)." 

3380 "Bank of New South Wales," George-street. 

3381 "Oriental Bank," Pitt^treet 

3382 " Union Bank," Pitt-street. 

3383 "Joint Stoek Bank," George-street 

3384 "EnglLsh, Scottish, and Austrdian Chartered Bank/' George- 

street. 

3385 "Bank of Australasia," George-street. 



-A u 



INTERCOLONIAL SZHIBITION, 1875. 231 

3386 ''London Chartered Bank," George-street 

3387 "City Bank," New Pitt-street. 

3388 « Union Club," Bent^treet. 

3389 "Australian Club," Ben^8treet. 

3390 "Victoria Club," Castlereagli-street. 

3391 "Civil Service Club," Macquarie-street North. 

3392 "Mort's Stores," Circular Quay. 

3393 "Block of Buildings," New Pitt and Spring streets. 

3394 « Exchange," Bridge-street. 

3395 " School of Arts," Pitt-street 

3396 , "St Patrick's Church," Church Hill. 

3397 "Dr. Lang's Church," Jamieson-street. 

3398 "Mariners' Church," Circular Quay. 

3399 " Wesleyan Chapel," York-street 

3400 "Mortuary, Reatern" (front view). 

3401 "Mortuary, Haslem Creek" (south end). 

3402 "University," George-street (looking south). 

3403 "St Paul's College." 

3404 "Argyle Cutting," Argyle-street 

3405 "H.M.S. Galatea in Farm Cove, Government House to the left" 

3406 "Cockatoo Island— H.M.S. Galatea in dock." 

3407 "Governor Bourke's Statue," Domain. 

3408 "Prince Albert's Statue," Hyde Park. 

3409 " Zig Zag," Lithgo w Valley. 

3410 "Zig Zag," Lithgow Valley. 

3411 "Domain Avenue," rear of Mint 

3412 "View in Domain." 

TONDEUR & LEMPRIERE, Melbourne. 

3412a Photographs of the British and Tasmanian Chaix)oal Iron Co., 
Limited, Tasmania. 

WANGARATTA, SHIRE OF. 

3413 Photographs of the Principal Views in Wangaratta. 

WHERRITT, C, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3414 Photographic Portraits, exhibited by the artist. 

WILLETT, G., Bridge-street, Ballarat 

3415 Case of Coloured Photographs. 

WOOD, DAVID, Clarendon-street, Emerald Hill. 

3416 Photographs, Plain and Coloured. 

FOELSCHE, PAUL, Palmerston, North Territory of South Australia. 

3417 Camp, with Fort Hill. 

3418 View of Palmerston, from Fort Hill, looking North. 

3419 Steamship Tararua at Port Darwin. 

3420 Landing-place at Port Darwin, west side of Fort Hill. 

3421 Esplanade, looking South-west. 

342S New Police Station (unfinished) corner of Esplanade and 
Mitchell-street. 



232 CATALOGUE OF THE 

3423 Mitchell-street, looking North-west 

3424 „ „ South-east. 

3425 '' The Residence." 

3426 Mitchell-street and Esplanade. 

3427 Telegraph Buildings. 

3428 Telegraph Station. 

3429 Mango Tree at the Old Settlement, Port Essington, abandoned 1849 

3430 Tomb, Old Settlement, Port Essington. 

3431 Port Darwin Natives. • 
3432 

3433 Peel's Well, Garden and Hosi)ital. 

3434 Hospital. 

3435 Tele^aph Allotment and Buildings. 

3436 Wesleyan Chapel and Mission-house. 

3437 Mr. John Lindsay's store, Mitchell-street. 

3438 English, Scottish, and Australian Chartered Bank, Smith-street. 

3439 Mr. Joseph Shekon's store, Bennett-street. 

3440 Telegraph Station-master's Residence. 

BARD WELL, W., Sturt-street, BaHarat. 

3441 Photographic Group of Ballarat Celebrities. 

CORNELL, FREDERICK, Foster-street, Sale. 

3442 Photographic View of Aboriginal Mission Station at Ramahyiick, 

I^ke Wellington, 

DAREBIN, SHIRE OF, East Bourke ; James Ryan, Secretary. 

3443 Photographic Views. 

DAYLESFORD BOROUGH COUNCIL. 

3444 Photographs of the Borough of Daylesford. 

EKMAN, R. A., LonsdaJe-street East, Melbourne. 

3445 Photographic Copies from Oil Paintings. 

3446 Interior of Dalecarlen Cottage, in the Swedish National 

Gallery. 

3447 Old Bridge and Church, Interior of, Stockholm. 

3448 Love Dance in the Parish of Debebo. 

3449 Gustavus Adolphus and Axel Oxenstiema, in the Swedish Na- 

tional Gallery. 

3450 Missionary in a Beer Shop, by Bordenberg, 

3451 On the Mealer Lake, by Edward Berg. 

EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT OF VICTORIA. 

3452 Photographic Views of State Schools in Victoria. 

3453 Photographs of Work^ of Art, presented to the Education 

Department of Victoria by His Majesty the King of Italy. 

3454 Photographs of Scenery and Studies of Trees, presented by the 

English Government to the Board of Education. 

PHCENIX FOUNDRY CO., Limited (W. A. Shaw, Manager), 

Ballarat. 

3455 Photograph of Locomotive Engine and Tender, manufactured for 

the Victorian Government by the exhibitors. 



T 



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if liie Irioiiit V4>T.M taI>-^ )w*r-. H'W Vv><^>^ ^>^ »l>ri^ svs^ vss^f . v»*n 
the ptxm lis O. V, l^ws^yv. I'V >*1>^"^n ^x <<y*^^N^>> !Hx xT,>.^ w-^x 

Sie«El l&SX bv liiO KXAI'^ Ci>V>*> W^v^v* ^W \\<<^x x^J^H^X^S^^^A^ >» "A^^ 

the next wsi w^ 

HEBDKX, GEO., Aih^Jsmw^ 0\tNV%^^-^><^A> INniN^A. 

(XonM\nMj>t^nuxx^.) 

3459 "I Promessi Six^i— MtHn\liuUt S^^w^ WW \^\i^ \\m\s/' \\\ 

' lYiani. 

3460 "View in the Tyrol,'' by Vivinnu 

3461 "View in the l>roi;* by Vivitt«i, 

3462 "Venice— Moonlight Scono on fh« i\Ym\\ V\^m\x'' \\\ \ S^ll^^. 

3463 "Carara — Landscauo/' by AmliH^n MnvKis of Mi^tMhi^ 
"Dogs," by Chevalier l^'rofoHnor ( ). Ail»*HU»lln, hi MHhi*»i'»» 
"Fall of Tivoli, hb in tlin Hixtomith (^tiHtMt'v/' \\m\ iIim )\\\\im\ 

by Tierce in the Vffm (Jiillf^ry in I'liM^tii'M^ li^v llMUiHlM. 
"Galileo before the Tritmnnl of (b^ liiijtiioiHMM." tliM u\\^\m\ 
by P. Banti, of Flor<ni«rt, nuti iti Im« )Mw»»i'«i«ilHf» 

3467 "Magdalene/' from orighml hy ikiln DmIi-m |ii IIim IMtlri 

Gallery. 

3468 ''Brohm Pantaloonif/' from ofi^Um] Ujf H^M0iM4|^»flf'^. 

HUNT, WILMAM, iMmu^tr 

3469 Portrait of (UmiU^tnuth 

3470 "Portrait,'* br I^;r/^'r/^jcb;^^y ( 



3464 
3465 

3466 



^^*/i/' 






3471 ^ iUfi^^^^ii ' 

3472 ^ Af. <if'^ "^i JVvJ V/ 

3473 ^ $ii^^^'/9>ft4^, 

3474 ^ i''^Vv/,» \4>:)f^/i^^A, 

3475 ^ ^yvvy^ ! r'^'/' ^/v Ai^/ i^^ 7 W 
347< ^ ^^'t'.'W J>v*<>* ' ^P^*^' 
3477 ^ K.vitii*;!. >4t«>',^*A' I 
^7* ^ VV.chi.v " 
.>47> ^ iixSu^r^ 



234 CATALOGUE OF THE 

3480 "Wood Scene," Roebach. 

3481 "Lime Kiln/' Park. 

3482 "Michael Angelo attending bis Favourite Servant," Soutre. 

3483 "Marguerite of Louvain," Lagge. 

3484 "SmaU Landscape/' 

3485 "Christ on the Cross/ Bronckhorst. 

3486 "Female Figure." 

3487 "Forest Scene," Stortenbecker. 

3488 "Market Scene," Grief. 

3489 "Hand of a Boy." 

3490 " Game," Hondykoter. 

3491 "Christ and St. John," after Murillo. 

3492 ^'Landscape," Watt. 

3493 „ „ 

3494 "Landscape," Van de Bent. 
3495 

3496 "Game," Shields. 
3497 

3498 "Balwally, Grantham River/' Glover (see 3197). 

3499 "Conway Castle," 

3500 "Greenwich Hospital," 

3501 "Dina's Braur, near LangoUan," 

3502 "Roche Abbey," 

3503 "Ulswater," 

3504 "Castella Mount," Juva^ 

THORPE, MISS, Liardet-street, Sandridge. 

3505 "View in Cumberland." 

3506 " View in Scotland." 

WHITESTONE, MISS, 23 Drummond-street, Carlton. 

3507 Picture after Sir Joshua Reynolds, subject: "Samuel" 

WHITESTONE, B. PERCY, 23 Drummond-street, Cailton. 

3508 Original Picture by Sir Joshua Reynolds, Subject: "A Doge of 

Venice." 

WHITESTONE, MRS., Drummond-street, Cai4ton. 

3509 Original Picture in the shape of a Fan, by Rubens — Subject: 

"Israelites Crossing the Red Sea." 

WILLDER, D., 22 Collins-street, Melbom-ne. 

3510 "Glover's Farm, Tasmania," Glover. 

3511 "Hampstead Heath," De Fleury. 

3512 "Ships Becalmed, Dutch Coast," Williamchurst. 

3513 "Winter Morning," Williams. 

35 1 4 " Winter Evening," „ 



INTERCOLOXIAI. EXHIBITION, 1875. 235 

DEPARTMENT 26. 

PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT AND CONDITION; 
MEDICINE AND SANITARY ; BENEVOLENCE ; 
GOVERNMENT AND LAW; RELIGIOUS 
ORGANISATIONS AND SYSTEMS; EDUCA- 
TIONAL, PROMOTION OF SCIENCE, CO-OPE- 
RATIVE ASSOCLA.TIONS, ilUSIC, DRAiLA^ 
INFLUENCE OF EXHIBITIONS UPON IN- 
DUSTRY, ART, SCIENCE, AND CIVILISATION 
GENERALLY. 

EXPERTS. 

Marcus Clarke, Esq. 



E. G. Fit^bbon, Esq. 
Dr. John Fulton. 



Henri J. Hart, Esq., Chainnxui. 
H.H. Hajter, Esq. 
Dr. Charles M'Carthy. 



Dr. J. B. MotherwelL 
Professor C. H. Pearson. 
Gustav Techow, Esq. 



The groups of subjects arrang'ed under this headiog ure not of a 
character tnat admits of the exhibition of illustrative objects to any 
appreciable extent In the absence of exhibits, therefore, we must 
content ourselves with some general descriptions and statistics of an 
explanatory nature. 

Gboup 100.— PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT AND 

CONDITION. 

This group was meant to include exhibits having reference to the 
Nursery and its accessories. Gymnasiums for athletic exercises, manly 
sports, the practical means in general use for rendering Dwellings com- 
fortable and healthy, and the accommodation 8up])lied by Hotels, Baths, 
and other institutions which minister to the daily physical wants of a 
civilised people. It is obvions there are no portable objects suitable for 
transport to an Industrial Exhibition in a distant foreign country which 
could throw any special light, or convey any instructive information, 
upon the habits and condition of Victorian society as viewed from the 
standpoint of this group. The management of the Nursery, for instance, 
and its requisites are pretty much the same here as they are in every 
other English-speaking country. Gvmnasiums, in like manner — of 
which there are several private establishments both in Melbourne and 
some of our principal towns — are with us what they are with European 
and American countries, as well in their appliances as in the use made 
of theuL Gymnastic exercises are not, indeed, so much in vog^e with 
our population as might he desired, especially as regards the young and 
the children of the public schools; but they are practised by the mtter 
to some extent. Active manly sports in the open air, however, such 



236 CATALOGUE OP THE 

as cricket, football, boating, nnd oompetttive contests in rowing, swim- 
ming, and, we may add, rifle matches and military drill amongst the 
volunteers, are much in favour with our young people. The great 
mildness and salubrity of the climate of Victoria conduce very much 
to encourage the universal practice of all these forms of invigorating 
])hysical exercise in the open air 3 and they are all entered into with 
such zest by the youth of the country that it is quite certain the fiiture 
generations of Victoria will exhibit no decline irom the parent stock 
in physical development, or in bodily vigour and activity. The dry, 
elastic, stimulating atmosphere and tne bright sunshine give to out-of- 
door athletic sports a charm for the young that has all the intensity of a 
})assion, just as it was in classic Greece of old, and from the same cause; 
and here at the present day, as it was in the land of the Isthmian 
Games in early times, the beauty and mildness of the climate impel 
the young, as it were, to those active sports which insure strength of 
muscle and a robust constitution. The naturally temperate habits of 
all native-born Australians — a result doubtless also due to climate — 
conduce likewise to this love of energetic exertion in the open air. In 
fact, properly to convey an idea of the ^* physical development and con- 
dition" of tne people of Victoria, the exhibition to be presented should 
be the display that is to be witnessed at one of our great competitive 
cricket matches. For that purpose, however, the student of sociology 
must resort, not to Philadelphia, but to Melbourne. 

BATHS. 

With respect to Baths, the employment of this source of health is 
almost universal, especially in Melbourne and most of the chief towns, 
where the houses are generally provided with the means for that pur- 
pose. There are also in Melbourne public and private bathing establish- 
ments, in which the warm bath, the Turkish oath, vapour and shower 
baths, are all to be had at moderate charges. There is likewise a free 
public swimming bath on the banks of the Yarra, and with respect to 
sea-bathing, there are few cities in the world better supplied with 
facilities than our metropolis and all the localities situated on the shores 
of Hobson's Bay. At one of the popular sea-bathing establishments 
in the suburb of St Kilda, it is a common occurrence on the evening 
of a hot-wind day in summer to see 500 or 600 persons at a time 
refreshing their heated frames in the briny waters. Indeed, sea-bathing 
is universal with all classes throughout the protracted duration of the 
summer season. 

HOTELS. 

By a strange misuse of terms, the appellation ^^ hoteF is given to all 
public-houses in Victoria, although there are not many of these which 
properly answer to this description in the European sense of the word, 
and none according to the American meaning. They are for the most 
part what are properly called public-houses for the sale of spirituous 
and fermented liquors, and relying chiefly on their bar trade for sup- 
port The number of these houses in Melbourne and in all the towns 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1S75. 237 

of the country is very great. All are obliged to provide accommoda- 
tion for travellers, and are in that respect somewhat analogous to inns 
in the United Kingdom. But the hotels properly so-called are estab- 
lishments of a very different order, and furnish superior accommodation 
of a most unexceptionable kind to the better class of travellers and a 
limited number of boarders. There are several of these in Melbourne, 
Ballarat, and Sandhurst, and, in a word, in all the principal towns. 
Boarding establishments on a vast scale designated hotels, which are 
such a distinguishing characteristic of the cities in the United States, 
have no existence in the Australian colonies. The domestic habits of the 
people are not favourable to such institutions. Families prefer the privacy 
and comfort of their own independent dwellings, and such unmarried 
people as have not made a home for themselves usually live in private 
boarding-houses, which accommodate only a few inmates each, perhaps 
about six or eight at the utmost. In a word, the state of matters m 
Victoria, and in all the Australian colonies with respect to hotels, 
public-houses, and boarding establishments, &c., is an exact reflex oi 
what is to be found in this respect in the United Kingdom. There is 
one exceptional feature, however, which is almost peculiar to Victoria. 
This is the existence of a large number of Wine Shops, where nothing* 
but Australian wine is sold, at various prices, according to quality, from 
2d. to 6d. a tumbler. These establishments, which only came into 
existence about 10 years ago, are now very numerous, especially in 
Melbourne and its suburbs, and tend very much to popularise the con- 
sumption of Victorian wine, greatly to the health ana sobriety of the 
humbler classes, who patronise them. 



Group 101.— MEDICINE AND SANITARY. 
Group 102.— BENEVOLENCE. 

There are few communities better supplied, in proportion to the 
numbers of the population, than the people of Victoria are, with insti- 
tutions both for the curative treatment of disease and suffering in all 
forms, and the relief of the helpless poor, whether aged or infirm, or 
neglected and orphan children. These institutions are supported partly 
by voluntary contributions and subscriptions from the public, and partly 
by annual grants of money made by the Legislature. These latter, for 
the financial year 1875-6, classified under their respective heads, were 
as follows, viz. : — 

Charitable Institutions £120 000 

Medical Department, inclu<ling Central Board of Health... 11,644 

Hospitals for the Insane ... ... ... 88 579 

Industrial and Reformatory Schools 48 9()d 

Total £269,08(1 



238 CATALOGUE OF THE 

As the subscriptions and donations from the public, every year, form 
the basis, and usually reach to about the one-half, of the sum granted 
annually by the Parliament, that is, in the present instance, about 
£136,000, the amount available in the present year (1875-6) for the 
hospital relief or cure, and the maintenance, temporarv or permanent, 
of the afflicted poor and destitute, is no less than £404,000 in round 
numbers. Thus a payment of something over 10s. per head per annum 
for every man, woman, and child in the colony is contributed to the 
work of public charity, independently of numerous undertakings of 
private benevolence which are well supported. Amongst the various 
modes adopted for adding to the funds aerived from public beneficence, 
the establishment, a couple of years back, of what is known as the 
" Hospital Sunday," has been most successful. On one special Sunday, 
previously nominated for the purpose in each year, all the churches and 
chapels of every religious denomination make a special collection &om 
their congregations assembled for Divine service, and the aggregate of 
the sums thus collected are paid into a fund, which is subsequently 
distributed in certain proportions amongst the several institutions formed 
for the relief of bodily suffering and disease. The sum collected in this 
way last year (1874) amounted to £5408. 

THE CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS 

Of Victoria are not only numerous, but are of the most diversified char- 
acter, giving succour to all forms of human distress, providing asylums 
and schools for the deaf and dumb, for the blind, for orphans, and for 
neglected or criminal children, hospitals for the insane, houses of refuge 
for the destitute, retreats for fallen women, infirmaries and dispensaries 
for the poor, lying-in-hospitals, ladies' benevolent societies (the latter 
very numerous), Dorcas societies, together with public hospitals for the 
treatment of disease and casualties, and minor establishments also of a 
curative character, and having some specialty, such as the Eye and Ear 
Institution, the Homoeopathic Dispensary, etc. When it is mentioned 
that all these in the aggregate, amount to upwards of eighty institutions, 
and that of these thirty are public hospitals, it will be seen that a 
detailed notice of them is not here possible. Nor, indeed, is it necessary, 
in order to convey an adequate idea of the vitality with which an active 
spirit of benevolence is at work amongst our community, inasmuch as 
the mere statement of the numbers, and distinctive characters of these 
establishments is sufficient to show the varied and comprehensive man- 
ner in which the calls of charity are practically responded to by our 
population. It will be sufficient to furnish some details and statistics 
relating to the principal institutions, since all those of minor importance 
are formed upon their model, as far as circumstances admit. This 
remark especially applies to the • 

HOSPITALS. 

Amongst the charitable institutions of the country the Hospitals 
claim the first rank. The hardships and exposure, the excitement 
and disappointment, incident to life on the gold-fields, aggravated often 



INTERQOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 239 

by intemperance and utter neglect of the laws of health by those 
engaged in the feverish search after the precious metal, together with 
the frequent occurrence of mining accidents — all combined to develop 
at an early stage of the gold discovery a large amount of sickness and 
human suffering and distress of various kinds at the great mining 
centres. The public, however, quickly recognised the necessity for 
hospital accommodation, and in conjunction with the Government took 
steps to furnish an adequate supply. Hence it has come to pass 
that an hospital, both for the surgical and general medical treatment 
of disease, has become an adjunct to every mining township in the 
country, as well as to each of the more early settled localities, which 
date their origin prior to the gold-fields era. 

What " the Faculty" and the educated public, whether in the 
United States or Europe, will be desirous of learning with respect to 
these institutions, is not mere historical or financial details relative to 
their foundation, but the evidence they afford of the state of the healing 
art in this newest of the new countries of the world. The information, 
statistical and otherwise, which we propose to give with regard to the 
two principal hospitals of the colony which are situated in Melbourne, 
will, we think, fiilly justify the conclusion that we venture to submit, 
namely, that the curative treatment of disease whether in the hands of 
the physician or surgeon, will be seen to have reached a point of per- 
fection, both scientific and practical, in this region of Australia, equal 
to what is witnessed in the oldest and most civilised countries of the 
world. The hospitals in the mining and the rural districts are, of course, 
on a very much smaller scale than those in Melbourne. £ut the skill 
of the professional staff in each of the latter finds its fair reflex amongst 
the medical officers of the former; and in furnishing statistical details 
of the numerous and varied cases dealt with in the Melbourne institu- 
tions, we are also illustrating the character and success of the profes- 
sional work accomplished in the country hospitals, though of course in 
amount this work necessarily falls below what is achieved in the large 
establishments of the metropolis. Chief amongst these is — 

The Melbourne Hospital. 

This noble institution, which is the largest and most important of the 
Hospitals of Victoria, stands within its own grounds in the heart of 
the city. It was founded in the year 1846, when Melbourne was but 
a small town, with comparatively few inhabitants. Of modest dimen- 
sions at first, it has grown with the growth of the city, and has now 
become an extensive establishment, of great capacity for the relief of 
human suffering, and of stately proportions. It is supported partly by 
subscriptions and contributions from the public, and partly by an 
annual grant of money from the State. The conduct of its affairs is 
under tne control of an elective Committee of Management, whose 
members meet weekly, together with a resident secretary, who is a 
salaried officer. The chief office-bearers are the Patron, who is 
usually the Governor of the colony; the president, vice-president, 
and treasurer, who are all honorary, as well as the members of com 
mittee. There are also counsel, solicitor, and auditors. The pro- 



240 CATALOGUE OF THE 

fessional staiF is composed partly of honorary and partly of paid 
officers. It consists of four physicians and four assistant-physicians^ 
four surgeons and four assistant-surgeons^ a resident physician^ and a 
resident surgeon^ a pathologist, a dispenser and assistant-dispensers, 
together with matron, nurses, £c. 

Objects of the Institution. 

The objects of the Melbourne Hospital are, in the first place, to 
afford medical and surgical aid to poor persons requiring it, and for 
treatment of casualties; but no person found able to pay for aid 
receives further than temporary assistance. And in the next place, to 
serve as a practical school of medicine and surgery, in which capacity 
it is affiliated to the Melbourne University. 

Admission of In-Patients and Out-Patients. 

Patients are admitted on Tuesdays and Fridays at half-past eleven 
o'clock. 

All sick persons are admissible as in-patients, on the recommendation 
of a contributor, provided they appear to the Committee of Manage- 
ment as proper objects of charity ; and that the physician or surgeon 
of the week reports that they are likely to receive benefit by treatment 
in the Hospital. 

Accidents and cases of emergency are at all times admissible without 
letters of recommendation, where delay might prove dangerous. 

The Committee may admit articled seamen on payment of 25s. per 
week, or in that proportion, on the order of the Shipping Master of the 
port, countersigned by the captain or agent of the vessel, in accordance 
with an agreement made with the Government. 

No lunatic, or person having the small-pox, or person suffering from 
chronic epilepsy, or firom ulcerated legs of long standing, or pregnant 
female for the purpose of confinement, or person whose case might be 
equally relieved as an out-patient, is deemed a proper case for admis- 
sion as an in-patient 

Whenever the applications for admission are more than can be ac- 
commodated in the house, the most urgent cases only are admitted. 

Convalescent Fund. 

There is also established a small Convalescent Fund, for the purpose 
of affording casual relief to destitute patients in certain cases, and also 
for providing change of air in cases of convalescence. 

Tne Convalescent Fund is applied by the Committee of Management 
towards the following objects : — 

1. To defray the expenses of patients going to the seaside or the 
country, and, when necessary, of boarding them. 

2. To the purchase of clothing. 

3. To defray the expenses of removing patients to their homes. 

4. To supplying small sums of money to patients leaving the house 
to assist in maintaining them until they are able to return to their 
ordinary work. 

5. To providing, wholly or in part, trusses or other surgical instru- 
ments or appliances for persons unable to provide themselves with the 
same. 



DCTEBCOLONIAL K3LH1B1T10N, 1875. 341 

Katubs as]> Exxksct of HofiPTTAi. Work, lS7i^ 

The number of cases trebled during' tlie year 1874 was 20,037; oi 
this number 23,130 received treatment as out^door patients and ca^ial* 
ties, and 3907 were received into the Hospital. Of these, 3059 were 
discharged cured or relieved, 53d died, and 313 remained in the insti- 
tution on the 31st c^ December. 

FiXANCIAL. 

For the year ending December 31, 1874, exclusive of bequests, the 
ordinary receipts on account of the maintenance-fund amounted to 
£5321 2s. 2d., in addition to which the sum of £2'.ib7 9s. 9d. was 
received from the Committee of Management of the Hospital Sunday 
Fund. These, together with the votes of the Legislature ot £15,000, 
made a total of £22,679 Is. lid. 

. . • • • 

The expenditure for the year amounted to £22,370 17s. lOd., which, 
with the debit balance of £2962 19s. &om the previous vear, made a 
total of £25,333 16s. lOd. The building-ipiind had, at the com- 
mencement of the year, a credit balance of £1721 7s. 2d. ; this sum 
was augmented by subscriptions and donations amounting to £834. 
The expenditure for sundry alterations and improvements to the out- 
patients' department and other parts of the builaing was £264 16s. 3d., 
leaving a balance in hand of ^290 10s. lid., which the Committee 
proposed to expend upon the erection of a new laundry and other 
works urgently required. 

The balance to the credit of the endowment fund at the date of the 
previous year's report was £3449 16s. 5d. During the year 1874, 
benefactions were received in various sums of £oOO, £5, and 
£120 5s. 2d. respectively ; and in bequests of £60, £5, and £20 each 
from deceased patients ; and from others of £50, and £10 17s. 8d. 
These amounts, with interest, £244 6s. 3d., make a balance of 
£4265 5s. 6d. 

Amongst the donations acknowledged are two of £100 each, from 
the Chinese Pak Cup Pew Trading Company. 

THE ALFRED HOSPITAL. 

This establishment ranks next in importance to the Melbourne Hos- 
pital. It was founded in commemoration of the visit of His Royal 
Highness Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, to the Australian Colo- 
nies some few years back. It is a handsome building, pleasantly 
situated in one of the fine parks lying to the south of the city, and the 
site has the advantage of being open to the healthful sea-breezes, which 
blow in from the bay about a mile distant. The photograph sent to 
the present Exhibition gives a good view of the building and the 
grounds in which it stands. 

The hospital is under the control of a president, and a Board of 
Management consisting of 15 members, together with a treasurer and 
paid secretary. The professional honorary staff consists of three phy- 
sicians and three surgeons attending in-patients, and of two physicians 
and two surgeons attending out-patients, together with a paid resident 



242 CATALOGUE OF THE 

medical officer and a dispenser, lliere is also a matron^ and the usual 
corps of nurses and male and female attendants. 

Kecent though the foundation of the institution is^ it has already 
proved a great boon to the afflicted poor, whether suffering from the 
special ailments of disease, or from accidents, especially in those 
quarters of the suburbs which were found to be inconyeniently remote 
from the Melbourne Hospital; and its usefulness is yearly on the 
increase. 

From the Fourth Annual Report of the Board of MaQagement we 
learn that the number of patients cured and relieved was greatly in 
excess of that in the previous year; whilst the death-rate was much 
lower, being only 879 per cent, against llVu per cent, in the year 
1873. The following tables indicate the number of patients attended 
to: — 



In-patients •.• ... •.. ••• 


•• • 


••• 


... 


1023 


Out-patients 


... 


••• 


... 


2213 


Casualties ... ••• 


... 


... 


... 


2285 


In-Patdents. 










Remained on dlst December, 1873 


•• . 


... 


70 




Admitted since ... ... ... ••• 


•• • 


... 


963 





Discharged cured or relieved 

Jl^IcU ... *•• ... *•. ... 

Remaining Slst December, 1874 


•• • 
••• 
... 


... 870 

• •• 80 

70 


Out-Patients, 
Remained 31st December, 1873 
Admitted since ... 


... 


... 372 
... 1841 


Discharged cured or relieved ... 
Attending on 31st December, 1874 ... 


••• 
... 


... 1792 
... 421 



1023 



1028 



2213 



2213 

Out of the 83 deaths, 71 cases were in an incurable or dying state on 
admission to the wards. 

The number of in-patients treated during 1874 was 148 in excess of 
the year previous, and the out-patients 51. There was a decrease in 
the number of casualties of 368; this arose in consequence of thegxeat 
care in preventing imposition on the part of many persons who had 
applied for relief without presenting any order or recommendation, 
and whose appearance indicated that thev were not destitute. 

The number of prescriptions dispensed during the year was 21,152, 
the cost of drugs having been 2fd. for each prescription. 

The number of patients treated in 1874 shows that the demand for 
hospital assistance is on the increase. The hospital at times was so full 
(the male wards more particularly) that many cases had unavoidably 
been refused admission from want of accommooation. The daily average 
for the last six months of the year of in-door male patients was 62, 
whilst the total number of beds in the male wards was 64. It is thus 
apparent how small a margin remains for emergencies. Under these 
circumstances, it is considered the time is approaching when it will be 



rSTKBCOLOlOAL SXHISITIOV^ 1^7$- ^^ 

neeesarj to enlarge the bnildin^^ mod the Mana^rs^ remembertB^ how 
liberallj their appeal to tbe pablie was responded to when the Hospital 
was founded, hare perfect confidence that when it is found neecesary to 
make anothis' application to the charitablj-disposed to contribttte to the 
building fund, the matter will be taken np with nndiminwhed gene* 

rositj. 

Ikcitraxlkl 
The Managen invite attention to the snlrieGt of incttrable6> many of 
whom are treated in this and other hospital, there being no separate 
asylnm for their reception. It has been found that the presence of 
such cases is prejudicial to parsons afflicted with diseases tnat may be 
cored; as many of the latter, applying when the wards are full, cannot 
be admitted for want of accommodation. The establishment of an 
Asylum for Incurables is therefore strongly recommended. 

HYDBOPATHIC ESTABLISHMBNTS. 

The Victoria Hydropathic Establishment in the Town of Prahran, 
three miles from the City of Melbourne, was established in 1856 by the 
present proprietor, J. F. W. Fulton, who had many difficulties to con« 
tend with — ^the cold water cure at that time being very little known in 
the colony. The premises will in no way bear comparison with the 
magnificent water-cure palaces of older countries, the accommodation 
being limited to twelve resident patients; in summer the applicants for 
admission are sufficiently numerous to fill* a place six times as large. 
The present proprietor had in contemplation tue erection of larger and 
more commodious premises, but increased experience suggested that 
the enterprise coula only be successftdly carried on by a company, as 
are most of the establishments in other countries. 

MELBOURNE BENEVOLENT ASYLUM. 

The object of this excellent institution, which is now in the twenty- 
fifth year of its existence, is to provide a home for aged, infirm, 
and disabled persons of both sexes, without reference to creed 
or nation. It is a large and commodious structure, located on a site 
which a few years ago was on the extreme outskirts of the city, but 
which is now the centre of one of its most populous new quarters, It 
is in consequence at present in contemplation to remove tue establish- 
ment to a site at some distance in the country, where the inmates can 
enjoy the advantages of a pure atmosphere and out-of-door employment 
in the extensive grounds with which it is proposed to surrouna the now 
building, which is to be made large enougn to afford the increased 
accommodation required for the augmenting number of applicants. 
The institution is under the control of a Committee of Management 
numbering thirteen members, three of whom belong to the honorary 
medical staff. There are also an hon. treasurer and auditors, a 
resident medical officer, a superintendent and secretary, a matron and 
a dispenser. The health of the inmates is attended to by two physi- 
cians and two surgeons. The Governor of the colony is president of 
the institution, and two of the judges of the Supreme Court act as vice 
presidents. Its income is derived from public subscriptions and don^ 
tions, and an annual grant-in-aid from the Legislature, and it amounted 

b2 



244 CATALOGUE OF THE 

last year (1874), to £12,768. Of this siun, £8750 came from the 
grant-in-aid. The expenditure, including a balance from the preceding 
year, reached to £12,078, leaving a surplus to go towards 1875 of £690, 
There is also in process of formation an endowment frind derived from 
legacies, bequests, and special gifts, which are to be allowed to accu- 
mulate with interest until the sum of £1 0,000 is realised, when the 
interest is to become available for the current expenses of the institution. 
The formation of this iiind is of very recent date, but it has already 
reached the sum of £1435. 

There is no one charitable institution in the country which effects a 
greater amount of good than the Melbourne Benevolent Asylum. It 
n*eely opens its doors to all those who are deserving of assistance or 
support, and thus evidences amongst our population that true civilisa- 
tion and community of kindness which should ever characterise a 
Christian people. The total number of cases relieved during the year 
1874 was 858. At the commencement of the present year (1875) 
there were 634 inmates in the Asylum. But there had been refused 
admittance, for want of room, no less than 259 applicants. 

IMMIGRANTS' AID SOCIETY'S HOME. 

This charitable institution was established upwards of 22 years ago, 
when the first great influx of population to the gold-fields brought 
with it many who were ill-fitted to cope with the hardships and priva- 
tions incident to that period of colonial history. There were soon 
found numbers of destitute, helpless, and sick persons who needed the 
Good Samaritan's aid, and the charitable spirit of the public speedily 
provided that aid by founding this "Home." The Government also 
lent its assistance, and these two sources still furnish its means of 
support The Home, however, has long ceased to be appropriated to 
new arrivals in the colony, or immigrants in need of succour. It is 
the refuge of the houseless, the destitute, and the casual poor, whether 
able-bodied or infirm, sick or in health, the blind and the maimed, old 
and young, women and men alike. An honorary Committee of 
Management, honorary treasurer and secretary, a resident superin- 
tendent, a medical officer, and a matron constitute the staff of office- 
bearers. All comers are received if there is room for them. In the 
case of 'the able-bodied a labour-test is applied as a means of securing 
a fair return for the relief afforded, and to prevent imposition. The 
number of inmates at the commencement of the present year, 1875, 
was 455, comprising 289 men, 90 women, and 76 cnildren. The daily 
average number admitted duriig the previous five years varied firom 
379 per diem in 1870, to 464 in 1874. Many of these were '^casuals," 
who sought a night's lodging and supper, and who, on getting break- 
fast next morning, performed the small quota of labour required of 
them, and then left The adult male inmates are described as for the 
most part '^suffering from disease, and requiring medical treatment and 
hospital care. The female inmates were deserted wives with families, 
young women with infants, as'ed and infirm, incurables and imbeciles." 
The school for children had a daily average attendance of 52, and those of 
any length of residence in the Home are reported as having made satis- 



IXMIHTIQK* 1S75. 245 



factory [NromsB. Hg receipti ham 9II aamnsi of uicoaw for 1874 ^^ere 
£6784 as. gd., of whith £dO0a ns ftnislnd hr tiie L!«Bl«tiT« mat. 
The expenditue aBonted id £6852 Is. 5d^ ^wiag a ddiit bdaace 
of *£67 l/sL 9d^ lepreKsted br a baak oiverdnIL 1m stnci ccoiiomY 
with which the Hone is eoadBctni is showm bj the &ct that the net 
eoBt per head was aaij £12 4& 4d. for die stq^port of the iamates 
dunng the year. Hk estahliskflMBt was feuaeil T sitaated doae to the 
heart of tfa« city at Priacas Bridge, aoath of ilie Yarrai. fiat the 
improvements in the GoTenmient Hooae Dooiaia aeeesBitatad its 
removal in July last to SaabarXy aoae eoasideraUe distaaee from 
town, where the Goreraaieat had soaie boiUiags aaited for the 
acconunodation of the 



HOSPITALS FOR THE INSANE, 

There are fovir pnUic lunatic asjlams in Victoria, via., at Yarra 
Bendy at Kew, at Ararat, and at Beechworth, the two first-named being' 
in the vicinity of Melboame, the others in the interior of the country. 
There is also a private asylum (Cremome) at Richmond, a suburb of 
Melbourne. The maintenance cost of the four public asylums repre- 
sents a considerable item in the annual expenditure of the State, being 
fixed at £88,579 for the financial year 1875-6. They are all first-class 
establishments, conducted, under Uie management of resident medical 
officers of high skill, upon the most recent and approved principles of 
science. A board of visitors and official medical inspectors male fire- 
qnent periodical investiofations during each year into the working oa 
the Asylums, their condition, sanitary and otherwise, the treatment of 
the patients, and all other matters concerning them, so as to preclude 
the possibility of any abuse, irregularity, or n^lect arising in their 
management 

The following table shows the 

NI7MBER AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE KSANE IN VICTORIA. 

In the Tana Bend Asylnm - • - 544 322 866 

„ Kew „ .... 323 313 636 

„ Ararat „ .... 211 159 370 

„ Beechworih „ .... 191 123 314 

Out on prohation from Yarra Bend Asylnm .90 46 136 

„ Kew „ . . 10 8 18 

„ Ararat » - - — 2 2 

„ Beechworih ,, ... 1 3 4 



Total number of registered lunatics in public asylums 1370 976 2346 

In lunacy ward, CasUemaine Hospital . . 1 — 1 

In Licensed House for the Insane, Cremome . 8 4 12 



Total number of registered lunatics . . 1379 980 2359 

Victoria appears to to neither much worse nor much better than 
other civilisea countries in reference to the prevalence of insanity 
amongst the population. During the past six years the proportion of 
patients received annually into uie asylums to the population of the 
country varied from 1 in 1350 to 1 in 1352. The total number of 
lunatics, idiots, and persons of unsound mind in proportion to the total 
population is — in Victoria 2*96 per 1000, and m England 2*54 per 



246 CATALOGUE OF THE 

1000. But in calculating these proportions the large number of un- 
registered patients in England are not included, so that it is obvious 
Victoria is more' favourably circumstanced, on the score of insanity 
among the population, than England. 

This is also shown by a comparison of the ratio of increase of patients 
in reference to increase of population in the two countries respectively. 
In Great Britain and Ireland the proportion of increase of lunatics 
compared to increase per 1000 of population is 13*20, and in Victoria 
8*19. The number of cases recovered and relieved in England is, on 
the average, 33*87 per cent, and in Victoria 55*39 per cent., showing 
a difference extremely favourable to the colonv. The death-rate in 
England averages 10.33 per cent, and in Victorfa 7.45 per cent., which 
also shows well for this country. Nearly one-fourth of the deaths are 
due to diseases of the nervous system. With respect to the causes of 
unsound mind, the medical inspector inclines to the opinion that 
intemperance is not the great cause of insanity in Victoria that some 
persons thought it at one time to be. The following table has been 
prepared, showing the percentage, calculated on the admissions, of cases 
in which drunkenness is assigned as a cause of insanity in Victoria and 
other countries: — 

Percentage of 
Drunkards. 

Victoria 22-20 

Scotland* 19-60 

Francet 22*80 

Hanovert 6*00 

United States (Pennsylvania)? - - - - - - 33 -OO 

England (Betlilehem)t 12*50 

One more point of comparison must be mentioned, viz., with respect 
to the cost ot maintenance. The average maintenance rate of lunatic 
patients in 54 English county and borough asylums is 9s. lOfd. per 
week, in 16 lunatic hospitals (England) it is £1 3s. 3d. per week, in 
Scotch asylums it is Os. 5|d. per week, in Irish asylums it is 9s. per 
week, and in the four Victorian asylums it is 13s. lOd. per week. 

The increased rate in the colony is due partly to higher salaries and 
wages given to the officers and attendants, and partly to clothing and 
bedding being dearer in Victoria than in the United Kingdom. This 
comparison of details between the parent country and the colony will 
convey a more distinct idea of tne condition of things relating to 
insanity here than could otherwise be given. 

* Reports February 1972. t Le Dr. L, V, Marce, Traits Pratique des Maladies Hentales. 

^Griessinger on Mental Diseases, page 171. 



Group 103.— GOVERNMENT AND LAW. 

The administration of public affairs in the colony is carried on by the 
Govemor-in-Chief and Vice-Admiral of Victoria, as the representatire 
of the Crown — the present Governor being Sir George Ferguson 
Bowen, G.C.M.G. — and an Executive Council^ whose members consti- 
tute the Ministry, or ministerial heads of the several departments of 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 247 

the public service, and are designated as follows, viz.: — ^llie Chief 
Secretary, the Treasurer, the Attorney-General, the Solicitor-General, 
the Oominissioner of Trade and Customs, the Commissioner of Crown 
Lands and Survey, the Commissioner of Railways and Roads, the 
Minister of Mines, and the Commissioner of Public Works. The office 
of Minister of Public Education, as also that of Postmaster-General, 
iei usually filled by one of the Ministers in conjunction with his own 
special department The number of Ministers is limited to nine, and 
the Chief Secretary is generally the Premier or Prime Minister, though 
from July, 1874, to August, 1876, this rank was held by the Attorney- 
General. Of the nine Ministers four are obliged by law to be members 
of Parliament; but as a matter of fact the whole of the nine have 
always seats in the Legislature, one of them at least, and sometimes 
two, being members of the Legislative Coiincil, and all the others 
havinop seats in the Assembly, but in whichever House they sit, they 
must be elected thereto in the ordinary manner as the representatives 
of separate constituencies or electorates, just as the unofficial members 
of the Parliament are elected. They hold office as long as they can 
command a majority in the popular Chamber, or Legislative Assembly, 
and their administration may last over the duration of one or two 
Assemblies. The general elections for the latter take place every three 
years in the ordinary course, but often at much shorter intervals, when 
the political aspect of matters in Parliament occasions the dissolution 
of the House. The Legislative Assembly consists of 78 members re- 
presenting 49 constituencies, and the Legislative Council of 30 members. 
These latter represent six provinces, and are elected for ten years, one 
member for eacn province retiring in rotation every two years. The 
opportunity for the introduction of new blood from time to time is thus 
atforded, although the Council is never wholly dissolved. 

LAW. 

For the administration of the law there are established the Supreme 
Court, with its several Circuit Courts of Assize in the country districts, 
the Vice-Admiralty Court, the County Courts, the Insolvency Courts, 
the Courts of Criminal Sessions, and the Police Courts. There are five 
Judges of the Supreme Court, namely, the Chief Justice and four 
Puisne Judges, one of whom sits in Equity. There are also a Master- 
in-Equity and in Lunacy, a Prothonotary, and several Sheriffs, with 
their IDeputies. The Judges of the County Courts are nine in number, 
and they preside also over the Courts of Insolvencvin the country 
districts, there being a Chief Judge of Insolvency in ftiel bourne. Under 
the head of Law Officers, there are ranked a Crown Solicitor and six 
Crown Prosecutors, also the Registrar of the Supreme Court and of 
Titles. There are 32 Stipendiary Police Magistrates, who are assisted 
in the discharge of the business of the several Petty Sessions Courts 
thnmghoat the country by the unpaid local Justices of the Peace, who 
constitate a numerous body, and are selected from the most intelligent 
and respectable members of the community. The police constitute a 
very traperior civil force. It numbers 907 constables, commanded by 
78 Sergeants, 3 Sub-Inspectors, 8 Inspectors, 13 Superintendents, and 



248 CATALOGUE OF THE 

one Inspecting-Superintendent, all under the control of a Chief 
Commissioner. There are, besides, 13 Detective Officers. The Penal 
Establishments and Gaols are under the management of the Inspector- 
General. He is assisted by 140 warders, who act as constables, and by 
several other gaol officials. 



Group 104.— RELIGIOUS ORGANISATIONS AND 

SYSTEMS. 

The religious denominations in Victoria are numerous, and of great 
diversity. Amongst those professing Christianity there are — ^the 
Anglican, or Church of England, the Roman Catholic Church, the 
Presbyterian Church, the Free Presbyterian, the Presbyterian Synod of 
Victoria, the CongTegationalists, the Baptists, the Free Church of 
England, the Wesl^yan Methodists, the United Methodist Free 
Churches, the Primitive Methodists, the Methodist New Connection, 
the Bible Christians, the German Lutherans, the Danish Lutherans, 
the Unitarian Christian Church, the Welsh Calvinistic Methodist^ 
Church, the Catholic Apostolic Church, the Christians, or Disciples of 
Christ, the Christian Brethren, the Swedenborgian New Church, and 
the Quakers or Society of Friends. These are tne most prominent, but 
there are several others of minor note. There are also two congrega- 
tions of Jews, and a large body of Pagans in the Chinese population. 
Up to a short time ago all the leading churches who would accept it, 
received pecuniary aid from the Government, in the form of annual 
grants and allowances of money. But this practice has been put an 
end to, and they all depend now for their support on the voluntary con- 
tributions and subscriptions of their respective congregations. These 
voluntary supplies are generally on a liberal scale, and the various de- 
nominations carry out their operations zealously and vigorously by 
means of Mutual Improvement Societies, Sunday Schools, Sunday 
School Unions, Bible Societies, Missions, Temperance Societies, and 
other methods of organisation. 



Groups 105 and 106.— EDUCATIONAL— SCHOOLS, 
INSTITUTIONS FOR THE ADVANCEMENT 
OF SCIENCE AND ART, &c. 

Public education is well provided for in Victoria. At the head of the 
educational establishments stands 

THE MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY. 

This is a fine pile of buildings, and when completed will constitute a 
very handsome structure. It is situated in the northern quarter of the 
city, in a domain of forty aer^, four of which are set apart as a Botanic 
Garden, the remaining thirty-six acres being laid out in ornamental 



INTEBOOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 249 

grounds, which exhibit a fine rich sward, composed of artificial grasses 
of various kinds. The grounds are interspersed with trees, shruos, and 
plants, indigenous and exotic, such as may be grown in the open air 
around Melbourne. These have been collected from the different 
geog^phical limits within which they have been distributed by the 
Land ot Nature. The system of planting adopted affords a pleasing 
diversity. Thus one portion of about four acres is devoted to the 
]>roductions of Europe found within 36^ of N. Latitude. Others, of 
nearly the like area, are each planted with those peciiliar to North 
America, Northern Asia, China, and Japan, with those of Southern 
America, Southern Africa, New Zealand, and Australasia respectively. 
Five avenues radiate from the front of the buildiDgs, planted with 
trees distinct in kind. Between these and the specific arboreta referred 
to, miscellaneous plantation is introduced, so that pedantic stiffness is 
avoided, and each quarter of the grounds presents some distinctive 
characteristic attraction for the visitors. 

The Botanic Garden has been laid out on a plan by which the 
natural orders are exhibited in their exact sequence of mutual affinit}', 
beginning with the highest in organisation, and ending with the lowest. 
By this arrangement it is found that the students rapidly acquire 
sound ideas of the natural relations of the orders of plants, tneir visits 
of study and observation to the garden constituting so many object 
lessons in botany. The Museum of Natural History, Mineralogy, 
&c,y is not large, but it is excellent of its kind. 

The government of the University is vested in the Chancellor, V ice- 
Chancellor, Warden, the Senate, and the Council — the Governor of the 
colony acting as Visitor. The Professors are those of Classics and 
Logic, Mathematics, Natural Science, History and Political Economy, 
Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology. The Lectures are those of Law, 
Chemistry and Practical Chemistry, Materia Medica, Surgery, Civil 
Engineering, Theory and Practice of Medicine, Midwifery and JDiseases 
of Women and Children, Forensic Medicine. There are also a Regis- 
trar, Secretary, and Librarian, and an Assistant Librarian. 

Although not yet twenty years in existence, the Melbourne Uni- 
versity has proved itself a most acceptable and popular institution for 
the higher education of the youth of Victoria, as is shown by the yearly 
increasing number of candidates for admission to participation in the 
advantages which it offers. There are held entrance examinations 
three times a year, namely for the February, July, and October terms; 
and these examinations apply not only to candidates for matriculation, 
but also for candidates for admission into the civil service of the 
colony. For the July and October terms of 1874, and the February 
term of 1875, there were altogether not less than 857 candidates for 
examination, including a large number of young ladies. Of these 
574 presented themselves for matriculation, of whom 211 passed, the 
lady students being well represented; and for the civil service ex- 
ammation there were 825 candidates, of whom 407 passed. The sub- 
jects of examination for matriculation are Greek, Latin, English, 
French or German, Arithmetic, Algebra, Euclid, Historv^ and 
Geography. Candidates are not permitted to matriculate who snail not 



250 CATALOGUE OF THE 

have passed in six at least of these subjects. To pass the civil service 
examination, four of these subjects only are requisite, of which English 
and Arithmetic are compulsory. 

A great want which has hitherto been felt has been that of a Hai.l 
where the due solemnisation of the ceremonies incident to University 
life should be celebrated. This want is now on the point of being sup- 
plied through the munificence of a private citizen, the Hon. Samuel 
Wilson, M.L.C., of Ercildoun, near Baliarat, who has recently made a gift 
of £30,000 to the Council of the University, on the sole condition tnat 
the amo'unt should be expended in the erection of a Hall. This build- 
ing, the plans of which are now in preparation by the architect, wiU be 
160 feet long and 53 feet wide, presenting an apartment well suited for 
the purpose which it is intended to iiilfil, and when complete it will 
form a conspicuous architectural ornament of the University. 

The income of the University is derived horn an annual endowment 
from Parliament of £9000, from fees, and other incidental sources. 
The total income for the year 1874 was £15,753 18s. 4A, and the 
total expenditure £16,392 16s. 3d., leaving a debit balance, represent;ed 
by a bank overdraft of £633 17s. lid. 

The Melbourne University is strictly secular in its constitution, and 
is open to all religious denominations. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS, &c. 

The sons of well-off colonists receive their education in private 
schools, or in ^uasi public schools or colleges more or less connected 
with religious denominations. The number attending private schools is 
about 15,000, but these are not necessarily all superior to the State 
schools. Some of them occupy ground which the State school system 
has not yet covered. Of the buildings in which the private schools are 
held, and of the teaching apparatus used in them, there is nothing to be 
said except that they do not differ from the appliances of a like natiire 
used in Great Britain. 

In regard to the colleges or grammar schools, a few details will be 
found interesting. These are five in number — viz., the Scotch College, 
the Church of England Grammar School, St. Patrick's College, the 
Wesley College, and the Scotch Ladies' College. The cost of education 
in these institutions is about 20 guineas a year; of board and 
education about 100 guineas. In all of them the instruction is exceed- 
ingly good, as is proved by the large number of pupils from each that 
pass the exigent civil service examinations and the matriculation 
examinations at the University. The constitution of the five schools 
varies in some respects. The principal of the Scotch College receives 
the revenue earned, and pays to the Presbyterian body, under whose 
auspices it is, 12]^ per cent on the amount, paying all expenses, and 
having whatever is left over as his profit or remuneration. At some 
of the others the denominations concerned keep the speculation in 
their own hands. These institutions have suitable premises, occupying 
sites granted to the religious sects before State-aid to religion was 
abolished, and denominationalism eliminated from the State-school 
system. 



The sectaiian ekmcnt is not pennitted to become promaient in die 
management c^ the sdiools. PapOs maty absent themsebncs from the 
religious tfarhings if they please^ and, as a matter of £&ct» Catholic boy:^ 
attend Protestant coB^pes, and Jewish boys and gids attend Chiistian 
colleges. 

The number c^ pupils in these high-dass schools is about looo^ and 
these are they from whom our legislators will have to be chosioi in a few 
years, and who will be the merchants, professional men, and wool or 
-wine growers of the friture: It is therefore of mudi consequence to the 
community that the training received in them should be sound and good. 
A few particulars in regard to the largest of them, the Scotch College, 
will show what kind of institutions they are. In this there are 36 r pupils, 
of whom 44 are boarders. There are twelve resident and eight visiting 
masters. The teaching and residence portions of the school buUding are 
commodious and well kept. In addition to the ordinary school appliances, 
there ar^ here to be found a gymnasium and swimming bath, apparatus 
for illustrating lectures on physical science, a chemical laboratory, etc. 
The institution is managed as systematically as a bank, and the whole 
school history of every pupil can be ascertained in a moment No bully- 
ing or fagging is permitted, no buying and selling, no bad language, smok> 
ing, or other offensive practices. Quiet, order, decorum, and gentlemanly 
bearing are vigorously enforced. A visit to the school A-hen in full 
operation is very grat&ying. The pupils are a fine-looking set of lads, 
and give an intelligent devotion to the work in hand which speaks well 
for teachers and taught, and gives promise of good results. Of the other 
advanced schools of Melbourne the same good account can be given. 
The Indies' College is a comparatively new institution, but it is already 
thriving, and promises to grow into great importance. At Geelong, 
Ballarat, and elsewhere throughout the colony, Uiere are also advanced 
schools doing good work. 

OUR STATE SCHOOLS. 

There are 281,876 persons in the colony between the ages of 3 and 
16 years, and of these 18 1,131 receive free education in our State Schools. 
Our system of public instruction is thus seen to be a subject of the 
highest national importance, and the apparatus by which the system is 
worked is deserving of every attention. First among the apparatus of 
our Department of Education must be ranked the school buildings. The 
present Education Act came into force on the ist of January, 1873, and 
as it compels parents to send their children to school, it of course 
became the duty of the Govemment to provide necessary and suitable 
school accommodation. Parliament supplied money liberally for this 
purpose, and the building of schools has been going on briskly during 
the past two years. 

llie school buildings are designed on the assumption that the best and 
most convenient size for the general school-room is about 53 feet long 
and 20 feet wide, containing two divisions of a class, which are worked 
by a teacher and pupil teacher. The new schools, therefore, have 
generally a number of rooms of the above size, or approximately so, with a 
proportion of class rooms about 20 feet square, fitted with galleries, into 



252 CATALOGUE OF THE 

which the classes are drafted for collective lessons. Each large school 
has also a room for the head-master, for the general transaction of school 
business, and which is used also for the meetings of local Boards of 
Advice. The part of each large school set apart for infants is generally 
about one-third of the whole accommodation. These rooms may be 
larger than 53 feet, but are of the same width as the others, 20 feet, and 
are generally fitted with galleries at each end for collective lessons, and 
low desks in two or three groups for silent lessons. The proportion of 
gallery accommodation in the infant department is generally about 66 
per cent of the children. 

The main school-rooms have the floor stepped longitudinally for the 
desks, with three steps four inches high and about three feet wide. Each 
room has three or four rows of desks in two double groups. The length 
of desk most desirable is about 12 feet, so that a 53 feet room is fur- 
nished with two double groups of 12 feet desks, divided by a thick 
curtain, which can be withdrawn at pleasure. Desks are generally of wood, 
screwed to the stepped floor. See pattern of desks, also plan of gal- 
leries. The desks are graded in heights, 24, 26, 28, 29, and 30 inches. 

The class-rooms are made 20 feet x 20 feet, arranged in proportion of 
one class-room to two large school-rooms, and sometimes two class- 
rooms to three school-rooms. Galleries, generally in five or six tiers, and 
with steps of from 10 inches up to 15 inches. Each step passes a seat, 
and is provided with a solid back. The furniture supplied for the teacher's 
use is a table and chair, and a book-pier to each school-room. 

The system of dual desks, so largely employed in America and in many 
of the Board schools in England, has not been approved for use in the 
schools of Victoria. 

The out-oflice accomodation usually provided is for three seats to 100 
children, with the necessary urinals for the boys. The earth-closet system 
is universally adopted, except in remote country schools, where it was 
found impossible to get it efl^ciently carried, out for want of suitable 
labour. 

The schools are of brick, a few cemented. Competitive designs were 
invited in the beginning, but most of the schools have been planned 
and executed under the direct supervision of the Department The 
cubic space provided for each pupil varies from 140 to 210 feet, and the 
ventilation is sufficient The following is, approximately, the number 
of State schools now in use : — 

State property ... ... ... ... ... 634 

State leased ... ... ... ... ... 422 

Capitation ... ... ... ... ... loi 

"57 
Of these, there were erected under the present Act : — 

Schools accommodating under 100 children ... 177 

100 to 249 ••• ••• <•• ••• ••• 39 

250 to 499 "* *" *** *** *** 9 

500 to 1000 ... ... ... ... ... 31 



The average cost per head was j^j, 256 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 253 

In cases of the smaller schools the above cost includes quarters for 
teachers. 

The books supplied by the Government for use in the State schools 
are, in the English language, ii in number, including Sullivan's and 
MorelFs "Grammar;" in geography, 3; writing models and copy- 
books of 9 different kinds; and n different arithmetic books. It 
also supplies 21 maps, 4 of them by W. K. Johnston, and 36 
sheets of domestic and wild animals. Also slates, blackboards, easels, 
notation frames, &c There is no mention of either cane or birch in 
the Board's schedule of necessaries, although chastisement is inflicted in 
its schools under certain restrictions. Perhaps the pupils themselves 
provide the necessary implements. In connection with the State-school 
system there is an excellent gymnasium, where teachers in training 
receive instruction which they will in time communicate to their own 
pupils. At the larger schools, too, gymnastic apparatus is provided. 

THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 

This institute is situated in the University grounds, and contains the 
usual dissecting-rooms and lecture theatres. The several branches of a 
complete medical education are here taught by one professor and six 
lecturers. 

A medical library and reading-room is provided for the use of the 
students. In the museum attached to the school are anatomical 
and pathological specimens, abnormal developments, skeletons, and 
other osteological preparations, etc. For the illustrations of the 
lectures in materia medica there is a collection of the substances used in 
the manufacture or compounding of drugs and medicines. There is 
also an excellent collection of coloured diagrams for use in the anatomy 
and surgery class-rooms. Bodies for dissection are obtained from the 
Melbourne Hospital. The lecturer on chemistry and his assistants have 
the use of a commodious laboratory, fitted with the apparatus necessary 
for practical teaching. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

At the Asylum and School for the Blind all the apparatus usually em- 
ployed in teaching people bereft of sight are in use, while skilled masters 
instruct the inmates in the work of basket, brush, and mat making, 
sewing, &c At the Institution for the Deaf and Dumb there are also 
all necessary appliances and materials. At Ballarat and at Sandhurst 
there are good Schools of Mines, where instruction is given in the arts 
and sciences necessary to be tmderstood by the miner, and these are 
supplied with instruments of research and materials for illustration. 

THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

The Melbourne Library, Museums, and Gallery, are all under the 
management of a body of Trustees, of whom Sir Redmond Barry is 
President, who have under them a librarian, sub-librarian, and sereral 
other officers as assistants, attendants, £c. llie cost of maintenance 
for the present year, 1875-6, is fixed at £14,095, of which one item \% 
£500, ror books to be lent to country libraries. This sending out of 



254 CATALOGUE OF THE 

books on loan to the rural and mining districts is a peculiar feature of 
the institution, which deserves to be noticed both as exceptional and 
commendable in its character. 

The number of books, pamphlets, Ac, in the Librarj at the 
commencement of the present year (1876) was 69,299 volumes of printed 
books, and 14,74? parts and pamphlets, making a total of 84,046 
works. 

The number of visitors to the entire building during the year 
<1874-5) was 406,256. Of these, no less than 241^842 resorted to the 
reading-room of the Library proper. 

THE INDUSTRIAL AND TECHNOLCXJICAL MUSEUM. 

This is another most valuable educational collection, containing 
apparatus illustrating the laws of physics, apparatus for class instruction 
in chemistry, especially for laboratory practice ; models of construction 
for building timber and masonry; mechanical models for illustrating 
course of lectures in mechanics; models for drawing, mechanical and 
architectural; instruments for the teaching of telegraphy, etc. 

The Museum was opened in a splendid hall, 220 feet in length, in 
September, 1870, its collections consisting mainly of specimens pre- 
sented by the exhibitors at the Intercolonial Exhibition of 1866. Since 
then many thousand specimens have been added, and the collections 
classified, not only scientifically, but in manufacturing groups, the aim 
being to make the Museum an educational institution, affording instruc- 
tion to those who desire to study the applicability of the mineral, vege- 
table, and animal products of Australia to the arts and manufactures. 
The present collection is as follows : — 1 500 specimens of aninud sub- 
stances, 3500 specimens of vegetable substances, more than 5000 speci- 
mens of rocks and minerals, 3500 models of mining and agricultural 
machinery, and more than 5000 specimens included in the metal- 
lurgic, pottery, glass, and building materials collections. In the 
manuifacturing groups or series, each is made to include the raw 
material, the process of conversion into the finished article, the tools 
and appliances with which the work has been done, and foreign 
specimens to serve as standards of comparison and a means of educa- 
tion. For instance, when the student has obtained a knowledge of the 
rock and mineral specimens, he passes on to the means by which they 
are obtained from the earth — the operations of mining and quarrying — 
and then their preparation for manufacture. The appliances used for 
these purposes are all placed ready for his examination in the Museum 
machinery court, and include mining tools, boring, winding, and pump- 
ing machinery; also, models illustrating methods of ventilation; timber- 
ing and masonry used in mines; methods of crushing, grinding and 
separating the ores and minerals raised. Then follows illustration of 
the industrial process through which the raw materials pass in being 
converted into manufactured articles. All the metals that occur in Aus- 
tralia are discussed in this exhaustive manner, as well as the clays, 
earths, sands, etc., used in the manufacture of pottery and porcelain, 
glass, etc. And so with other substances. Wool, wheat, or grain 
is exhibited in its natural state, and in every shape in whidi it 



INTEBCOLOKIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 2fi5 

appears until it is finished off for man's uses. Besides the apparatus 
abready enumerated, the Museum is well provided with microscopes, 
balances, and other aids to scientific research. The success of the 
collection, and of the instruction afforded with its aid, is in a great 
measure due to the zeal and ability of the gendemen engaged in the 
task, Mr. G. H. F. Ulrich, F.G.S., and Mr. J. Cosmo Newbery. 

The course of study is not schol^tic, but it is merely intended to aid 
the student in acquiring sound practical knowledge of the various 
branches and divisions of the Museum. Besides the two gentlemen 
just named, who teach, respectively, practical chemistry and mineralogy 
and mining, there are also lecturers in mathematics, practical geometry 
and mechanics, and telegraphy. This fine Museum, being always open 
to the public, is a source of much profit and pleasure. The Industrial 
and Technological Museum and School are managed by a committee of 
the Trustees of the Public Library, Museum, and National Gallery, of 
which the Hon. Samuel Bindon is Chairman. 

SCHOOLS OF DESIGN. 

Under the auspices of the Trustees of the Public Library, etc., there are 
twenty-four Schools of Design in operation in the colony, and performing 
very useful work. The pupils are of both sexes, and are chiefly engaged 
in mechanical trades. Journeyman and apprentice engineers, carpenters, 
carvers, plasterers, painters and decorators, moulders, cabinetmakers, 
etc., are receiving instruction in these schools, and acquiring consider- 
able proficiency in several branches of graphic art The annual com- 
petitive exhibitions of the pupils' work attract a good deal of attention, 
and it is gratifying to observe that good progress is being made. The 
branches taught are drawing of the human figure; ornamental, landscape, 
mechanical and architectural drawing; drawing from the round and 
from nature; perspective and isometrical projection. Instruction is 
also given in colour as applied to decoration, in designing from Aus- 
tralian plants, trees, leaves or flowers, etc; also in practical geometry, 
linear drawing, etc. The machinery employed in teaching consists of 
models, drawings, diagrams, specimens of natural objects, and is being 
added to as often as the fimds at the disposal of the Commissioners will 
admit 

THE MELBOURNE OBSERVATORY, 

With its mammoth telescope and most complete a«tronomical apparatus, 
is too well known to the scientific world to need any s{>ecial notice 
beyond stating that it is pleasantly situated on elevatea ground in the 
centre of the Government-House Domain. In conjunction with it may 
fitly be mentioned the Rotal Society op Victoria, which, like itM 
namesake in England, has been founded for the advancement of science. 
To the same category belongs the Zoological abtd Acclimatisatiobt 
SociBTT, which has done much to farther the special and interesting 
objectB which its title indicates it to have in view* The gardens of 
this BocietT, in the Royal Park^ are a verv attractive ret>ort for the 
public. Tlie Medicnl tSoeiety of Victoria, tne Pharmaeeutieal Society^ 
the AfrieuUmral Soaety, the HortieuUural Society, with its beautiful 



256 CATALOGUE OF THE 

gardens on the banks of the Yarra, the Law Institute, the Institute 
of Architects, the Athenceiim or Mechanics' Institute — all by their 
titles denote the purpose and character of their operations^ and it is 
sufficient to say that they are all in a flourishing condition. 

In fine, Science, Art, Art-manufacture, the institutions properly per- 
taining to them, and the results harvested, have attained a sinralarly high 
and aavanced position in Victoria, which contrasts remarkably with the 
fewness of its years as one of the latest-settled of the newly-peopled 
countries of the world. This is to be accounted for by the fact that the 
rush of immigration produced by the gold discoveries brought with it large 
numbers of highly educated men from all parts of Europe and America. 
When matters had settled down after the first tumultuous influx, these 
men naturally betook themselves to the avocations they best under- 
stood, and the general prosperity resulting from the abundant pro- 
duction of gold readily supplied the means which secured a permanent 
local habitation for the labours, accomplishments, and instructive 
operations of these enlightened new colonists. 



Group 107.— CO-OPERATIVE EFFORT. 

Co-oPERATivE associations, in the ordinary acceptation of the term, 
whether for the production or distribution of marketable articles, have 
not been to any extent domesticated in Victoria, although some two or 
three eflbrts of the kind have succeeded. The most signal instance of 
the success, however, of combined eflbrt on the part of the industrial 
classes in towns has been achieved by the Building Societies, of which 
there are about a score altogether in Melbourne and the chief towns, 
with operations extending to some millions of pounds sterling. 

Benefit, or Frieyidly Societies, such as the Oddfellows, the Foresters, 
the Druids, the Good Templars, &c., are most extensively established 
amongst the operative classes, and have branches in all the leading 
towns. 



Gboup 108.— music and THE DRAMA. 

Both these features of modern advanced civilisation are well developed 
in the Victorian community. Melbourne maintains a first-class theatre 
(the Royal), where the drama in all its varieties — ^legitimate, sensa- 
tional, farcical, and burlesque — ^by turns meets with due representation 
all the year round. The theatre-going public are an intelligent and 
critical audience, who have always shown a keen appreciation of the 
talents and accomplishments of the great actors and actresses firom 
Europe and America who have from time to time visited Melbourne. 

The Italian Opera also flourishes here. The Opera-house is a hand- 
some and commodious structure, well adapted for its purpose, and i» 
usually filled during the operatic season. 



INTEBOOUINIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 357 

Mude is in high fiirour with the Melboarne people. Concerts, 
sustained by a host of able performers, are given once or twice a 
week in some one or other of the public institutions, and the perio- 
dical celebrations by the Philharmonic Society and the Liedertafel 
always attract crowded audiences. The Melbourne City Council have 
furnished their noble and spacious Town Hall with a magnificent org^n 
at a cost of upwards of £4000, and this splendid instrument is occa- 
sionally used at g^nd concerts with fine effect. It is not, however, 
employed frequently enough to roll forth its thundering harmonies, 
ana there is even a danger that it may become deteriorated from 
disuse. 

Like all metropolitan cities, Melbourne has a fiill supply of enter- 
tainments and exhibitions of different kinds, those which otier musical 
attractions, however, greatly preponderating. 



Group 109. — EXHIBITIONS — ART AND IN- 
DUSTRY—THEIR INFLUENCE. 

• 

The Victiynan Academy of Art sends some of the works of its members 
to the present Exhibition, and it is itself a practical and successful 
illustration of the advantageous results which flow from those most 
characteristic institutions of modem times — viz., formally oganised 
periodical expositions of the products of art and industry in various 
countries, the latest and greatest of which is the Grand Centennial 
American Exhibition at Philadelphia in 1876. 



Group 85. 

ALCOCK & CO., 132 Russell-street, Melbourne. 
3515 Polymachinum, or Chest Expander for Athletic Exercise. 



Group 86. 

TTJFFE, JOHN, 92 Collins^Bt^eet East, Melbourne. 

3516 Mechanical Dentistry in Gold and Vulcanite Process, made by 

exhibitor. 

JONES, CHRISTINA, 106 Lonsdale-street East, Melbourne. 

3517 Ladies' Surgical Bandages. 

3518 Lace Stockings. 

3519 Knee Caps. 

3520 Tmas. 

s 



268 CATJLLOOUE OF THB 

MIEB, BAERAS, 77 Swanston-street, Melbourne. 

3521 Artificial Teeth on Gold and Silver Plates. 

3522 Vulcanite Sets of Teeth, &c. 

MIER, A. B., 121 Smith-street, OoUingwood. 

3523 Artificial Teeth on Gold and Silver Pktes. 

3524 Vulcanite Sets of Teeth, &c. 

REID, CHARLES, Swanston-street, Melbourne. 

3525 Mechanical Dentistry (ArtificialTeeth)manufacturedin Melbourne. 



Group 87. 

ALFRED HOSPITAL, COMMITTEE OF, Melbourne; Henry Tate, 

Secretary. 

3525a Photograph and Statistics of Alfred Hospital. 

BOLGER, HENRY, Kay-street, Carlton. 
3525b Model in Cardboard of State School, Wangaratta. 



Group 92. 

COLLINGWOOD ARTISANS' SCHOOL OF WORKS; J. Bade, 

President 

3526 Saddlery. 

3527 Plaster Models, Masonry. 

3528 Trunkmakers' and Brass Work. 

3529 Japan Work. 

3530 Carved Moulds for Picture Frames. 

3531 Upholstery. 

3532 Cabinet Work. 

3533 Model Engines. 

3534 Patterns for Engines. 

3535 Cooperage. 

3536 Pictures in Oil. 

3537 Woolwork. 

3538 Carving Lathes. 
3538a Copper Still. 
3538b Carved Bracket. 
3538c Crayon Drawing. 

Group 93. 

« 

MEYER, ALFRED, Woodbine Cottage, Simpson-street, East 

Melbourne. 

3539 Composition of Music, original^ and a copy of same with pen 

and ink. 



DTTEROOLOiriAL EXRIBITIOy, 1S75. ^9 



TASMANIA. 

Tasmania, the recognised sanatorium of Australia, was undoubtedly 

fonned by nature in her kindliest mood. The whole island is replete 

with natural beauties. Mountains, upon the summits of which are 

lakes miles in extent, frown in snow-capped majesty on peaceful 

valleys and extended plains, framed as it were hf sinuous rivers, the 

banks of which form a fit theme for the pen of the poet or the pencil of 

the artist. The prosperity which marked the progress of the colony in 

the year 1873 has in no way diminished, and the expired portion of the 

year 1874 will bear favourable comparison with the improvement in the 

condition of the colony which caused such general satisfaction at the 

date of the last Intercolonial Exhibition. On the 7 th of December, 

1870, the population, according to the census then taken, numbered 

99,328 souls, of whom 52,853 were males, and 46,475 were females. 

The estimated population on the 31st of December, 1874, was 104,176, 

the number of males being 55,117, and the number of females 

49,059. The revenue for the year 1874 was ;<f 32 7,925, and the 

expenditure ;£'3o8,i53. The amount expended for public works, roads, 

bridges and railways, inclusive of the expenditure on the Launceston and 

Western District Railway, amounted during the year 1874 to ;^45,4io. 

The value of imports during the same period was ^^ 1,2 5 7, 7 8 5, while that 

of exports was;^92 5,325. 

Education is compulsory, and of a most comprehensive character; 
there is no district so remote that there are no schools, and no loophole 
is allowed to the careless parent to permit him let his children drift into 
ignorance. Numerous industries have been established, and those who 
were not content to observe the wool growing on the sheep's back are 
astonished at seeing how rapidly and beautifully the Hobart Town and 
Launceston mills convert the raw material into articles of luxury as well 
as of domestic consumption. 

The total area of the island of Tasmania is 16,778,000 acres, of which 
3,902,000 acres are alienated from the Crown by grant and sale; 
1,348,400 acres are held under depasturing licenses from the Crown. 
The total, area under cultivation in the colony is 331,366 acres. Wheat 
takes first rank in extent and importance, 57,633 acres being allotted to 
this cereal; barley, 5129 acres; oats, 32,704 acres. Consequent on the 
high duties enforced on agricultural produce by the Northern Australian 
colonies, and the fluctuating state of the intercolonial markets, the atten- 
tion of Tasmanian agriculturists has of late years been turned to the 
production of wheat for the English market, and this has become the 
most important article of strictly agricultural produce. 

Salubrity and comparative coldness of climate, owing to lower latitude, 
makes Tasmania an excellent breeding station of stud stock for all the 
Australian continent, especially as regards animals whose features of 
excellence consist in that massiveness of form of muscular development, 
in the dewy mellowness of skin, and of that hardy constitution so requisite 
in theox, the mutton sheep, and the draught horse. The number of horses 
in Tasmania in 1874 was 23,208, cattle 110,450, and sheep 1,714,168- 

s2 



260 ^ CATALOOUB OF THE 

The bulk of the wool produced is Merino. The export of wool during 
the season 1874-5 amount^ to 6yo69,299 lbs., which represents a value 
of ^428,883. 

The mining industry for many years past was confined to gold and 
coal, but during the past year tin, iron, and slate have attracted much 
attention. The yield of gold for the last twelve months was — ^alluvial. 
850 oz., or 680 02. less Uian in the preceding year; quartz, 3800 oz. 
14 dwt., or 669 oz. 14 dwt. more. The quantity of quartz crushed was 
3452 >^ tons, or 731 J^ tons less than last year. The average yield per 
ton of stone was i oz. 5 dwt. Sj4 grs. The average value of gold per 
ounce was;^3 19s. 6d. for alluvial, or is. per ounce more than in 1873: 
quartz, ^3 19s. 6d, with no variation. 

The mineral which occupied the greatest share of attention was tin : 
the supply of ore being practically unlimited — ^the character of the 
deposits at Mount Bischoff admitting of no question. The total amount 
of tin shipped since the opening of the tin works is 286 tons 12 cwt. 2 
qrs. The only locality in which silver ore has been worked in Tasmania 
is Penguin Creek, but at present operations have ceased. 

With respect to the iron resources, it is stated that a small parcel of 
27^ tons of ore was sent to the United Kingdom during the twelve 
months. The quantity raised during the year is set down as 1400 tons; 
of this quantity 1000 tons were raised at Middle Arm, West Tamar, and 
400 tons at Lewisham. 

The discovery made since the beginning of the present year of a Islt^c 
lode of bismuth, is regarded as one of the most important that has yet 
taken place, and it is alleged that if the lode should prove permanent it 
must become a source of considerable wealth to the colony. 

The island of Tasmania is intersected by many very valuable coal 
measures. At present the output of Tasmanian coal is not extensive, and 
the island is mainly supplied from Newcastle, New South Wales, although, 
for domestic purposes, Tasmanian coal is used to a considerable extent. 

During the past two years attention has been directed to the slate 
deposits of Tasmania; the high prices ruling for English slates in the 
colonial markets has induced the Australian Slate Company to conrntience 
work on a fair scale, and they are turning out some excellent slates. 

At Ilfracombe Bay there is an extensive bed of a pure white clay 
which seems very refractory, and which when mixed with fine quartz 
(also abundant and close at hand) forms an admirable fire brick. 
Common days are found in all directions, and the iron companies are 
now manufacturing bricks. Kaolin or porcelain clay is also found at 
Circular Head. 

In the West Tamar district limestone quarries have been worked for 
many years past. There is an immense mountain of blue limestone, 
situated about two miles from the township of Latrobe, on the River 
Mersey. At the River Don there are very large deposits of pure carbo- 
nate of lime, and the eastern districts, especially Fingal, abound with 
lime of various kinds and qualities. 

The principal timber trees of Tasmania — such as Blue Gvan^ String) 
fiark, WTiite Gum, or Gum-topped Stringy Bark, Swamp Gmn, and 
Peppermint Tree — furnish a hard, close-grained, and strong timber. 



Huon Pine is very durable, and is employed for boat-building and for 
house-fittings, &c. Blackwood makes exceNent naves and spokes, cask 
staves, &c. Native Myrtle is valuable for house-fittings. Swamp Gum 
yields the finest palings and other split-stuff in the world. Sassafras 
affords timber for house fittings, bench screws, &c. Celery-topped Pine 
is chiefly used for masts and ship's spars. In addition to these, Silver 
Wattle is used for wood staves, and trenails, mallets, sheaves of 
blocks, and turnery are manu&ctured from Iron Wood, while the Native 
Cherry is used for tool handles, gun stocks, &c. White Wood is a fit 
wood for engraving purposes^ while Pink Wood and Native Pear are 
suitable for turnery. Tonga Bean Wood and Native Box have both 
a pleasant odour — that of the latter being fleeting. 

Bark is largely exported to England and New Zealand for tanning 
purposes. The price ground varies from jQ^ to j£6 per ton at the 
ports. During the year 1874 about 4870 tons were exported. 

The principal animals are the kangaroo, wallaby, opossums and 
bandicoots, the skins of which are all of avail for tanning purposes, the 
fur being highly valuable as rugs, etc The devil and Tasmanian tiger 
are formidable beasts, and make great havoc amongst the flocks. The 
tiger is a low, long-bodied animal, with powerful forequarters, and a 
dog-like head, weighing sometimes from 60 lb. to 70 lb. The devil, 
though not so large, is far more hideous in appearance than the tiger. 

Of birds, 171 species have been observed, but of these only 20 species 
are supposed to be peculiar to Tasmania. The notes of many of the 
birds are very musical, the most remarkable being the reed warbler, the 
tones of which approach those of the nightingale, the black and white 
magpie, and the butcher bird. The principal edible birds are varieties 
of quail, duck, snipe, golden plover, and Cape Barren goose. 

Reptiles are represented by the whip snake, so small as to be harm- 
less, die black snake and diamond snake, the bite of which is venomous. 

There are twelve species of freshwater fish, the most valuable being 
the cucumber grayling. Amongst the estuary fish, those most appreci- 
ated as edible are the sole, whiting, and gar-^sh. The best of the deep 
sea fish is the trumpeter, king fish, and rock cod. During the last ten 
years the trout, the tench, and perch have been established in many of 
the rivers and lakes. Fine salmon and salmon trout are supposed to 
have succeeded, as young salmonids have during the last four years been 
seen. 

The chief industries are brewing, jam making, fellmongering, 
tanning, and coopering. Some of the beer is excellent, and is fully 
appreciated in the other colonies. In 1874 ale to the amount of 23,000 
gals, was exported. The amount of jam exported in the same year was 
nearly 3,000,000 lb. Tasmanian leather is excellent, all varieties from kip 
to kangaroo basil being supplied of such quality that a great falling-off 
in the importation of inferior leather from Euroi^ean ports has taken 
place. The woods of Tasmania, particularly the silver wattle, black- 
wood, and some of the gum woods, are admirably adapted for cooper's 
work. 

The exhibits from Tasmania will be found interesting in elucidating 
the resources and industrial progress of that colony. 



262 CATALOGUE OF THE 



DEPARTMENT 1. 



Group 1. 



BRITISH AND TASMANIAN CHARCOAL IRON COMPANY 
(Limited) ; T. H. Lempriere, Manager, 56 Queen-street, Melbourne. 

3540 Iron Ore fix)m Ilfi-ucombe on tlie River Tamar, 22 large blocks. 
3540a Earthen Brown Hematite. 

3540b Iron Ore and Crystallised Brown Hematite. 
3540c Oxides of Iron from above claim, Anderson Creek, Western 
Tasmania. 

CHAPMAN, A. K., Gold Commissioner, Tasmania. 
3540d €k)ld, Tin, and other Minerals. 

COVERDALE, DR. JOHN, Port Arthur, Tasmania. 

3541 Freestone, Brown, from Port Arthur. 

3542 Freestone, Grey, from Port Arthur. 

GROOM, FREDERICK, Harefield, Tasmania. 

3543 Coal from Harefield, St. Mary's, near JFingal. 

GILLON & SONS, Hob art Town, Tasmaniar. 

3544 Freestone, Brown, from Cambridge. 

3545 Freestone, White, from Cambridge. 

3546 Limestone, with fossils from Mount Wellington. 

3547 Freestone, White, from Pontville. 

3548 Honestone, from Mount Wellington. 

3549 Black Marble from Chudleigh. 

3550 Granite Boulders from the East Coast. 

HAMMOND, W., Hobart Town, Tasmania.* 

3551 Bismuth from Mount Ramsey. 

HARCOURT, JAMES, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3552 Samples of Pig Iron. 

3553 Iron Ore, calcined and uncalcined, 

3554 Iron Ore, from Bruni Island. 

3555 Smelted Iron, from the Derwent Iron Works, Hobart Town. 

3556 Coke from Seymour Coal. 

HARRAP, A., Launceston, Tasmania. 

3557 Petrified Wood. 



INTEBCOLONIAL EXHIBITIOK, 1875. ^^^ 

\ 

HEMATITE lEON WORKS, West Tajnar, TaBmania. 

3558 Pig Iron. 

3559 Iron Ore, calcined. 

3560 Iron Ore, nncalcined. 

3561 Marble Limestone, Bhie. 

3562 Marble limestone, Whiter 

HULL, MISS, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 
3562a TopasE^ 
3562b Cornelians. 
3562c Beryls, from Lake Sorell and the Islands. 

HULL, HENEY J., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3563 Tin Ore, from the deposit, George's Bay. 

HURST, JAMES, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3564 Goal, from the mines at Tasman's Peninsula. 

JUST, T. C, Launceston, Tasmania, per Messrs. 0. Tondeur oc Co., 

Melbourne. 

3565 Iron Ore from River Blythe, Tasmania, containing iron per- 

oxide 98-67 per cent; impurities, 1.13 per cent.; yield of 
malleable iron, 69 00. 

JUST, THOMAS COOK, Joiunalist, Charles-street, Launceston, 

Tasmania. 

3565a Magnetic Iron Ore. 

3565b Oxide of Iron and Asbestos in Serpentine Rock. 

KERMODE, W. A., Mona Vale, Tasmania. 

3566 Freestone, Grey, from Mona Vale, near Ross. 

3567 Freestone, Brown, from Mona Vale, near Ross. 

3568 Salt, from Saltpan Plains, Mona Vale estate. 

LYELL & GOWAN, 46 Elizabeth-street, Melbourne. 
(Australasian Slate Company, Limited.) 

3569 Slate from the Piper's River, on the North-east Coast, in the 

County of Lewisham, about fifteen miles east of George 
Town. 

3570 Tin Ore and Ingots, from the Don Tin Mining Company, Mount 

Bischoff. 

3571 Marble Limestone, Black, Blue, and White, from the River Don. 

3572 Coal from the River Don. 

MOUNT BISCHOFF TIN MINING COMPANY, Tasmania. 

3573 Tin in Ingots (a ton), from Mount Bischoff. 
3573a Tin Ore, from Mount Bischoff. 

RAYNER, E., New Norfolk, Tasmania. 

3574 Limestone, with large Fossils. 



264 CATALOGUE OF TH£ 

ROYAL SOCIETY OF TASMANIA. 

3574a Topazes from the Straits Islands. 
3574b Beryls from the Straits Islands. 

SEYMOUR COAL COMPANY, Tasmania. 

3575 Coal from the Seymour Mines, upper seam. 

3576 Coal from the Seymour Mines, lower seam. 

3577 Fire Clay, in two blocks. 

SHIELDS, R. R., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3578 Freestone, Brown, from Lindisfeme. 

SMART, DR., Hobart Town. 

3579 Gold in Quartz, from the City of Hobart Mine, Fingal. 

SMITH, JAMES, Launcestoii. 

3580 Bismuth from Mount Ramsey. 

STANHOPE COMPANY, Tasmania. 
3580a Tin Ore. 

STRACHAN, R., Cambridge, Tasmania. 

3581 Salt, from Salt Works, Cambridge. 

SWIFT, A. H., Tasmania. 
3581a Freestone from Point Ventenat, Tasmania. 

WIGGINS, R., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3582 Freestone, White, from Cambridge. 

Group 3. 

TASMANIAN COMMISSIONERS. 

3583 Bricks, Tiles. 

TASMANIA MINERAL EXPLORATION COMPANY, Tasmania*. 

3583a Topazes from the Bass's Straits Islands. 
3583b Beryls from the Bass's Straits Islands. 



DEPARTMENT 2. 

Group 5. 

ARCHER, W. H. D., Longfoixi, Tasmania. 

3584 Wheat. 

3585 English Barley. 

3586 Linseed. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. ^^^ 

ORESWELL, a F., Hobart Towxi, T&amftma. 



3587 


Wheat ("Bed Tnsrti.Ti"). 




3588 


„ ("Golden Drop"), 




3589 


„ ("Fanner's Friend"). 




3590 


WheAt. 




3591 


EngliRh Barley. 




3592 


Oats (black). 


• 


3593 


Oats. 




3593a Oats. 




3594 


Rye. 




3595 


Tares. 




3596 


Horse Beans. 




3597 


Grey Peas. 




3598 


Peas. 




3599 


Red Dutch Clover. 




3600 


Meadow Soft Grass Seed. 




3601 


Perennial Red Clover Seed. 




3602 


Somfoin Seed. 




3603 


Lucerne Seed. 




3604 


Linseed. 




3605 


Canary Seed. 




3606 


Rape Seed. 




3607 


Cocksfoot Grass Seed. 




3608 


Italian Ryegrass Seed. 

Evergreen Perennial Ryegrass Seed. 




3609 




3610 


Bluegum Seed. 




3611 


Stringybark-Gum Seed. 




3612 


Tiigbtwood Seed. 




3613 


lorest Tree Seeds. 




3614 


Ryegrass Seed. 




3615 


Clover Seed (white). 






DALGETY, MOORE & CO., Launceston, 


Tasmania. 


3616 


Wheat, Brown Velvet. 




3617 


W heat, Silver Drop. 




3818 


Wheat, Purple Straw. 




3619 


Oats, Tartarian. 




3620 


Oats, Poland. 





DEAN, WILLIAM, New Norfolk, Tasmania. 

3622 Wheat, Hunter's White, grown at Belmont, New Noi-folk. 

DOSSETOR BROTHERS, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3623 Blue-gum Tree Seeds. 
3623a Flour. 

GIBSON, WILLIAM, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3624 Wheat. 



266 CATALOODE OF THE 

GOUGH <k SMITH, 150 Little FfindersHitreet East, Melbourne. 

3625 Hops, grown by R. Jeffrey, Tasmania, (bale 44)^' 
3625a Hops, grown by Jamieson and Co. (bale 31). 

3626 Hops, grown by Thomas Nicholson (bale 27)« 

GRAVES, J. W., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3627 Native Bread (Mylitta *Australis). 

GULLIVAR, B., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3628 Blue-gum Tree Seed (Eucalyptus globulus). 

3629 Blackwood Seed (Acacia melanoxylon). 

3630 Black Wattle Seed (Acacia). 

3631 Silver Wattle Seed (Acacia). 

HARRAP, A., Launceston, Tasmania. 

3632 Wheat, Boucher's Velvet. 

HOGARTH, D., Launceston, Tasmania. 

3633 Wheat, Winter (Braemar Velvet). 

KEMP, GEORGE, Upper Bagdad, Tasmania. 

3634 Wheat. 

3635 Wheat. 

LIPSCOMBE, FREDERICK, Sandy Bay, Tasmania. 

3636 Blue-gum Tree Seeds, 5 OR. weight. 

NICHOLSON, THOMAS, New Norfolk, Tasmania (Agent, E. 

Latham, Melbourne.) 

3636a Bale Hops (Tasmanian grown). No. 1. 
3636b Bale Hops, No. 2. 

NICHOLSON, ANTHONY, Glen Dhu, New Norfolk, Tasmania 

(Agent, E. Latham, Melbourne.^ 

3636c Bale Hops (Tasmanian grown). No, 3. 
3636d Bale Hops (Tasmanian grown). No. 4. 

SHARLAND, W. C, New Norfolk, Tasmania. 

3637 One Bale Hops (Golding), grown at New Norfolk. 

3638 One Box Hops, grown at New Norfolk. 

SHOEBRIDGE, E., New Norfolk, Tasmania. 

3639 Hops (Golding), grown at New Norfolk. 

THOMPSON, MRS. JOHN, Cormiston, Tasmania. 

3640 Native Bread (Mylitta 'Australis). 

WRIGHT, STEPHEN H., O'Brien's Bridge, Tasmania. 

3641 One Bale Hops (Golding), grown at O'Brien's Bridge. 



BAfiXAKD. E. K-, ADMIRAL, Holiwrt TV>>«^ tW^vi^ii^i^. 
3^2 Kse^sn PQe {psaroeMi by the Tefre^/> wfm}i^\ |>M1 trf iKt^ kt^N^^t 

BELBIX AND DOWDEIJ-, TVisiwAttw^ 
3G4iA Bundle of Broad P^in^ 

BUKGOYNK, W., Hol^art Town, tV«tm«{«, 

3643 Cabe of SOver Wattle (Acacia iWUiAt*^), l«»^>l^v uw^l t\w v)il 

cuks. 
S644 Cube o£ Blackwood. 

CARLSEN, P. O., Tort Ai^lmr, Tmituwik . 

3645 Danish Pipe, carved in ivory and myiil<»» 

CASTRAY, L, R., Hohart Town, T«mimtit«. 

3646 Cubes of 24 Si^ecies of Wood, poliHhml ho i\n to iihow ih^if Vrtlui* 

as Veneers. 

3647 Keg made of Blackwood. 

COVERDALE, DR. JOHN, Port AhImm, T«mtmt»l... 

3648 Cubes of Different Hiyeden of Wood. 

ELLIOTT, G. B. B., Kiv**i' Cnm, T««tiMu»hi, 

3649 Blackwood Slab. 

GLOVER, C. A,, FmuUViu, Tu^umhlu, 

3650 Sassafi-as Bark. 

HOOPER, O., HoUii Toyrii, Ti^^tnun'm. 

3651 Cube of Blue-^iu W^i^^^J, iun^^A, 

3652 Log of Bla>ekwrjr>l, |x>Jj>Jj/?'J, 

3653 Root of Bkckwr»i imAi>}M, 

3654 Slab of llxLfjii-\nsitc. y/i^^u^A, 

3655 Sial> cif Pit.v>5.]x^rv^^ ^/r W^;U;w/«i; j^y*^i^4 

3656 Piiir oi F*ir:j'u**^ V»'v>9 V*u»**. 

3657 Tl2*^ Ej^vv:m. *jf ^y^f^ijjf. V/v/Ji. 

3658 T-w-^r J&;5t*vv.;H '.j^ l^/^y**^j^^ 

3659 Ei^r^Vy ^ if vi/.<*yr • 
3600 Eii^ wuri»*< It'^ii ^x'.^**^^ 
3661 F'.»uj S:#wiuu*n I^.v^r 
^5o62 T-^v i>'usr» we '^tt^.t- ',.4»i»*3«. 

3'>M T::iL.^u*r \^ 7.^ "!? •/***. 



268 CATALOGUE OF THS 

3665 Wineglass of Teati'ee. 

3666 Pair of Candlesticks, red myrtle and whale teeth. 

3667 Six Napkin Kings of Teatree. 

3668 Six Napkin Kings of Pine Knot. 

3669 Two Small Muskwood Picture Holders. 

3670 Two Muskwood Croquet Balls. 

3671 Huon-pine Plate. 

3672 Ironbark Plate. 

3673 Work Basket of Muskwood. 

3674 Puzzle Snuff-box of Teatree. 

3675 Auctioneer's Hammer of Cocoanut Wood. 

HEMATITE IKON WOKKS, West Tamar, Tasmania. 

3676 Charcoal. 

HULL, HUGH M., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3677 Cube of Huon-pine (Dacrydium Franklinii), polished so as to show 

the grain. 

3678 Cube of Sheoak (Casuarina quadrivalvis), polished so as to show 

the grain. 

3679 Specimen of Sheoak with the Bark. 

3680 Cube of Curly Gum, polished so as to show the grain. 

3681 Cubes of Muskwood (5) (Eurybia argophylla), polished so as to 

show the grain. 

3682 Cube of Heoak (Casuarina stricta), polished so as to show the 

grain. 

PKICE, KEV. C, Launceston, Tasmania. 

3683 Blackwood Box, made from a pile used in Tamar Bridge, in use 

50 years. 

3684 Cherrywood Box. 

3685 Ivoiy Box. 

• SHAW, F., Swansea, Tasmania. 

3686 Cube of Oyster Bay Pine (Callitris Australis), polished so as to 

show the grain. 

TOLMAN, J. C, Hobart Town^ Tasmania. * 

3687 Cubes of Sheoak, 3 (Casuarina quadrivalvis), polished so as to 

show the grain. 

3688 Slab of Blue-gum Wood (Eucalyptus globulus). 

Group 9. 

KEAD, K. C, Redlands, New Norfolk. Agents in Victoria, James 
Henty and Co., 1 1 Little Collins-street West, Melbourne. 

3689 One Bale Tasmanian (1875) Hops, grown at New Norfolk. 

SHAKLAND, W. S., Woodbridge, New Norfolk, Tasmania. Agents in 

Victoria, James Henty and Co., Melbourne. 

3690 One Bale Tasmanian (1875) Hops. 



DTTEROOUMnAL KniBITiaN% 1 87 5. 961^ 

SHOOBRIDGE (B.) k SONS, BfAy VvAl nnd YaUevfiekl New Nor 
folky Tasmania. Agents in Yictoria, Jas. Hentj and Co., MelWuiTie. 

3691 One Bale Shoobridge's Tasmanian (1875) Hops, gixywn at New 
Norfolk. 

DEGBATES, JOHN, Hobfirt Town, 'Dismania. 
3691a Mak. 

GIBSON, WILLIAM, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 
3691b Flour. 

GBACIE, WILLIAM, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 
3691c Malt 



DEPARTMENT 3. 
Oboxjp 11. 

ANGLO-AUSTRALIAN GUANO COMPANY, Tasmania. 

3692 Guano from Bird Island, procured by a company, whose establisli- 

ment is in Hobart Town. 

Group 13. 

COLYIN, CHABLES, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3693 Oil from the Black Whale. 

3694 Oil from Mutton Birds, from the Islands in Bass's Straits. 

BURGOYNE, W., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3695 Oil from the Sperm Whale. 

3696 Oil from the Sea Elephant. 

EDWARDS, G. W., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3697 Grass-tree Gum (Xanthorrhoea), two samples. 

JOHNSTON, THOMAS, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3698 Head Matter, or Spermaceti of the Si^erm Whale. 

Group 14. 

COYERDALE, DR. JOHN, Port Arthur, Tasmania. 

3699 Earth for Paints, red ochre. 

3'j^Q() „ red ochre in powder, fr-om Port Arthur, 

3701 Pipeclay from Port Arthur. 

LAUGHTON, JAMES, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3702 Earth for Paints, umber coloured. 
37Q3 ,, „ sienna coloured. 



270 CATALOGUE OP THE 

LXJNATIC ASYLUM OOMMISSIOJTBMI OF TASMAKLA 

3704 Oil from the Blue-gum Tree (Eucalyptus globulus). 

MITCHELL, MRS., TasmanU. 

3705 Gum from the Oyster Bay Pine-tree (Gallitris Australia). 

MURRAY, WILLIAM, Hobai-t Town, Tasmania. 

3706 Soap from the Murray Field Works. 

3707 Soap. 

3708 Candles from the Murray Field Works. 

STRUART, J. W., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3709 Writing Ink. 



DEPARTMENT 6. 

Group 16. 

CHANCEELOR, EDWARD, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3710 Ale, in Bottles. 

3711 Ale, in Bottles. 

DEGRAVES, JOHN, Hobart Town. 

3712 Ale, in cask. 

GRACIE, WILLIAM, Hobart Town. 

3713 Ale, in cask. 

LATHAM, J., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3714 Vinegar. 

MITCHELL, JAMES, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3715 Ale, in Bottles. 

MURRAY, WILLIAM, Glenorchy, Tasmania. 

3716 Cider. 

WOOD, R., Hobart Town, Tasmania, 

3717 Porter, in Bottles. 

3718 Ale, in Bottles. 



DEPARTMENT 6. 
Geoup 17. 

GARDNER & M'KENZIE, Lauuceston, Tasmania. 



3719 Skins and Furs. 



iSjs. an 





OMA^NT, J^ Hkibiit TivwB, 


3720 


Furs of FIttfcypiiB (6). 


3721 


„ Bbck OpoBsuni (6). 


3722 


„ Gwy „ (6), 


3723 


„ Ringfcdl ^ (6). 


3724 


„ TigBTHCt (6), 


3725 


„ Native<aifc (6). 


3726 


y, JLangaroo-nt (6). 


3727 


„ Tig«^ (1), 


3728 


Skins of Birds. 



SCHMmr, R, Hobsit Town, 

3729 Rugs and Furs. 

TATLOB, DAVID, St. Johnstone's, TasmMua. 

3730 Wool, 6 Combing Fleeces in the Grease. 

3731 „ 6 Clothing „ „ „ 



DEPARTMENT 8. 
Group 19. 

HUT Ji, HENRY, Tremlett, Hobai-t Town, Tasmania. 

3732 E^s of Tasmanian Birds. 

Group 20. 

COVERDALE, DR JOHN, Port Arthur, Tasmania, 

3733 Shells of the Mutton Fish from Port Ai-thur. 

3734 Gelatinous Searweed, said to produce a valuable jelly for the table. 

DA YIES, ARCHDEACON, Hobart Town, T^maaiii^. 

3735 Shells of the Mutton Fish. 

DA VIES, R H, Torquay, Tasmania. 

TASMANIAN SHELLS; 

3736 Haliotis albicans, Quoy, Voy. of Astrolabe III., p. 311. 

3737 „ noevosa, Martyn. 

3738 Cassis semi-granosa, Lamk. 

3739 „ pyrum, Lamk. 

3740 Voluta fusiformis, Sw. 

3741 „ undulata, Lamk. 

3742 Dosinia grata, Reeve. 

3743 Purpura textilosa, Lamk. 

3744 Fusus pyrulatus. Reeve. 

3745 „ Tasmaniensis, Ad. and Aug., Proc. Zool. Soc, 1HG3, p, 421. 

3746 „ Beckii (?), Reeve, Icon. VIII., 35. 



272 GATAIiOGUE OF THJB 

3747 Natica Sttangei (f), Beeve. 

3748 „ conica, Lamk. 

3749 Sigaretiis zonalis, Gray. 

3750 Fissurella macrochisma, Gray. 

3751 „ scutella, Gray. 

3752 Modiola albicostata, Laink. 

3753 „ Australis, Lamk. 

3754 Triton cutaceus, Lamk. 

3755 „ subdistortus, Lamk. 

3756 „ Barthelemyi, Bernard. 

3757 Phasianella Australis, Gmelin. 

3758 „ ventricosa, Quoy and Gamard. 

3759 Fasiolaria fusiformis, Phil. 

3760 f, coronata, Lamk. 

3761 Nerita atrata, Lamk. 

3762 Lophynis Australis, Sowerby. 

3763 Lepidopleurus variegatus, Ad. and Aug., Proc, Zool. Soc., 1864. 

3764 Mitra glabra, Swains. Exot. Conch., p. 21. 

3765 Patella tramoserica, Martyn. 

3766 „ costata, Sowerby. 

3767 Patella sp. 

3768 „ Gealii. 

3769 Ancillaria marginata, Lamk. 

3770 Emarginula Australis, Quoy. 

3771 Zizyphinus armillatus. Wood. 

3772 Myrtilus Menkeanus. 

3773 Mactra rufescens, Lamk. 

3774 Conus Novae Hollandise, A. Adams. 

3775 Waldheimia Australis, Quoy. 

3776 Bisella melanostoma, Gmelin. 

3777 „ aurata, Quoy, Voy. Astrolabe. 

3778 „ nana, Lamk. 

3779 Turritella Tasmanica. 

3780 Chitonellus Gunnii, Beeve. 

3781 Stomatella imbricata, Lamk.. 

3782 Scalaria granulosa, Sowerby. 

3783 Amphibolina fragilis, Lamk. 

3784 TJvanilla squamifera, Koch in Phil. Abbild., p. 4, f. 9. 

3785 Bittium granarium, Kiener. 

3786 Diloma odontis. Woods. 

3787 Cypraea angustata. Gray 

3788 „ Comptoni, Gray. 

3789 Siliquaria Australis, Quoy. 

3790 Marginella muscaria. 

3791 Mesodesma triquetra, Beeve. 

3792 „ erycina, Dsh. 

3793 „ natida. 

3794 Turbo undulatus, Chem. 

3795 Area velata„ Sow. Proc. Zool. Soc., 1833 

3796 Vulsella Tasmanica, Beeve. 



INTERCOU»(IAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 273 

3797 Eleachos nitidiis, PhiL 

3798 „ irisodontes, Quoy. 

3799 Siphonaria denticalata, Quoy. 

3800 Littoiina unifasciata, Criaj. 

3801 Nassa pauperata, Lamk. 

3802 Yenerofiris carditoides, Lamk. 

3803 „ Diemensis. 

3804 Semele sp. 

3805 Murex trifonnis. 

3806 Vermetus dentifems, Quoy. 

3807 Tellina albida, Lamk. 

3808 Trochooochlea striolata, Wood. 

3809 Buccinum alveolatiim, Kliener. 

3810 Parmophonis Australis, Lamk. 

3811 Clanculus undatus, Montfort. 

3812 Sanguinolaria livide. 

3813 Auricula cornea, Swainson. 

3814 Tapes sp. 

3815 Venus aphrodinoides. 

3816 ,, gallinula, Lamk. 

3817 „ roborata. 

3818 „ aphrodinoides, vara. 

3819 ,, lamellata, Lamk. 

3820 „ gallinula var. a. 

HAYES, J., Gordon, Tasmania. 

3821, Sharks' Fins, dried for Chinese market. 

3822 Mutton Fish, dried for Chinese market. 

INNES, J. H., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3823 Shells from Flinders and other islands in Bass's Straits. 

3824 Shell — two pair of Earrings. 

3825 Trigonia, unset. 

3826 Trigonia, set as a Brooch. 

JOYCE, JOHN^ Launoeston, Tasmania. 
3826a Hams and Bacon. 

SALMON COMMISSIONERS OF TASMANIA. 

3827 Brown Trout. 



DEPARTMENT 9. 
Group 21. 

ARNETT, S., Bothwell, Tasmania. 

3828 Skins of the Kangaroo (12). 

3829 „ „ Wallaby (12). 

3830 „ „ Grey Opossum (24). 

3831 „ „ Black Opossum (12). 

3832 „ „ Wombat (2). 



274 CATALOaUK OP THE 

FRY, G., Ringarooma, Tasmania. 

3833 Cheese (3). 

TASMANIAN COMMISSIONERS. 
3833a Large Black Opossum Rug. 
3833b Do. Grey do. 

3833c Grey Native Cat-skin Rug. 
3833d Ringtailed Opossum Rug. 
3833e Grey Opossum Skins. 
3833f Black Opossum Skins. 
3833G T^er Skin. 
3833H Seal Skin. 

Group 22. 

HOLROYD, KENNEDY, & CO., Hobart Town. 

3834 Jams and Tart Fruits (5 cases). 

JOHNSON (G.) BROTHERS & CO., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3835 Jams and Jellies. 

3836 Tart Fruits. 

LATHAM, J. Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3837 Jams, 14 varieties. 

3838 Jellies, 14 varieties. 

3839 Preserved Rhubarb. 

3840 Raspberries, preserved. 

3841 Black Currants, preserved. 

3842 Gooseberries, preserved. 

Group 23. 

ARNETT, SIMON, Bothwell, Tasmania. 

3843 Leather of Kangaroo Skins. 

GARDNER <k M'KENZIE, Launceston^ Tasmania. 

3844 ISkins of Kangaroo, tanned and dressed (24.) 



DEPARTMENT 11. 
Group 25. 

BULMAN & JOHNSTON, Launceston, Tasmania. 

3845 Woollen Manufactures from Tasmanian Wool only. 

3846 Tweed. 

3847 Shawls. 

3848 Blankets. 

3849 Flannel. 

3850 Hosiery. 

3851 Knitting Yams. 



DOWIXKG k JOBS^VCHSE. 



3853 

3853 
3854 H( 



3855 Hate. 

3856 Cb{& 

3857 Materials lor Hat Xamn^Kmre^ 

Group 30. 

CABSLEX, P. O., PiKt Artlrnr, Tasmaiiia. 

3858 WaDdng Sddc of Sassafras. 

• HAYES, M., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3859 Walking Stick, carved. 

HOOPER, G., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3860 Large Sapling of Sassafras, curiously contorted. 

3861 Walking Sti^ of Macquarie Harbour Yine. 

3862 Club <rf Femtree Wood, polished. 

3863 Cocoanut Wood Canes (2). 

3864 Walking Sticks of Dogwood. 

3865 Whalebone Walking Canes (4), turned. 



DEPARTMENT 13. 
Group 34. 

CARLSEN, P. O., Port Arthur, Tasmania. 

3873 Carved Ivory and Wood Egg. 

3874 Carved Ivory and Wood Cruet Stand. 



DEPARTMENT 14. 

Group 36. 

COYERDALE, DR. JOHN, Port Ai-thur, Ta«mAniii. 

3875 Spinning Jenny, made of Tasmanian Myrtle, carvwl and jniulii 

by exhibitor. 

BLYTH, MISS, Hobart Town, Ttwrnaniii. 

3876 Ornamented Table Top, with wreath of Tanmanian ilowci'H piiinUMJ 

on top. 

t2 



276 CATALOGUE OF THC 

HOPS, MISS MARY, Hobart Town, Tagmama. 

3877 Ornamental Table, with wreath of Tasmanian flowers painted on 

top. 

GRAVES, MRS. JOHN WOODCOCK, Tasmania. 
3876 Table Top, Tasmanian Ferns. 

MEREDITH, MRS. CHARLES, Orford, Tasmania. 

3878 Rustic Ornamental Table, with white flowered Grass-tree, 

(Richea dracophyllum), painted on the top. 

3879 Rustic Ornamental Table, with Flower (Clematis coriacca). Fruit 

(Billordiera longiflora), painted on the top. 



DEPARTMENT 18. 

Group 49. 

HEMATITE IRON COMPANY, Tasmania. J. & T. Muii-, littie 

Flinders-street West, Melbourne. 

3879a Iron Castings, Water-pipes, etc. 

MOIR, J., Tasmania. 
3879b Assortment of Shot. 



DEPARTMENT 22. 

Group 60. 

HULL, HUGH M., Hobai-t Town, Tasmania. 

3880 "Hull's Hints to Emigrants," 50 c«)pies, from the Author. 

TASMANIA, COMMISSIONERS OF, Tasmania. 

3881 Newspapers. 

3882 Volume of Statistics, from the Govei-nment Statistician. 

3883 Volume of Legislative Council Journals for the Session of 1874, 

fix)m the Clerk of the Council. 

WALCH & SONS, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3884 "Guide to Tasmania." 

3885 "Walch's Tasmanian Almanac for 1875," from the Publishers. 

Group 61. 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS OF HOBART TOWN, 

Tasmania. 

3886 Chart of the GreneraJ Cemetery, Hobai-t Town. 



INTERCOLONIAL BXHIBItlON, 1 87 5. 277 

HULL, HUGH M., Hobai-t Town, Tasmania. 

3887 Map of the Island, showing the alienated portions^ the rail- 

ways, and roads, towns and villages. 

MOORE, HON. WILLIAM, Minister of Lands, Hobart Town, 

Tasmania. 

3888 Map of the Island, showing the gold, coal, iron, and tin deposits. 

WALCH «k SONS, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3889 Chart of the City of Hobart Town, showing the electoral divi- 

sions. 

3890 Chart of the Town of Launceston, showing the electoral divisions 

Group 66. 

ROYAL SOCIETY OF TASMANIA. 

3891 Meteorological Tables, published by the above. 

S. WALCH & SON, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 
3891a Tasmanian Postage Stamps. 



DEPARTMENT 25. 

Group 81. 

BAILY, H. H., Tasmania. 
3891b Rembrandt Portraits (porcelain). 

BLYTHE, MISS E., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3892 Flower Paintings from Nature, "Autumn Leaves," painted by 

exhibitor. 

3893 "Mount Wellington," in water colours, painted by exhibitor. 

3894 "Cape Honeysuckle, or Protea Flower," painted by exhibitor. 
3894a ^'Stirling Castle." 

EVANS, G. F., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3895 Oil Painting, " English Landscape," from an original picture by 

Constable, painted by exhibitor. 

GAYLOR, CHARLES 'WILLIAM, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3895a "Ship Natal Queen." 
3895b "Ship Nautilus." 
3895c "Ship Southern Crosa" 

GRAVES, J. W., Hobai-t Town, Tasmania. 

3896 Oil Painting, "Harvest Time," painted by exhibitor. 



978 CATALOaVE OF THE 

LLOYD, GRANT H., New Norfolk, Tasma«i& 

3897 ''Sydney, from Yaucluse." 

3B98 "Port Jackson Heads." 

3899 "Barrenjoey, at tlie mouth of the Hawkesbury." 

3900 "Peat's Ferry on the Eiver Hawkesbuify, by daylight." 

3901 "On the Derwent from Bisden, Mount Wellington in the back- 

groimd/' 
3903 "Launoeston on the Tamar, with Ben Lomond in the distance. "^ 

All the above painted by exhibitor. 

LUCHMAN, J., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3903 "Scene on the River Derwent," in water colour, painted byT^the 

late T. E. Chapman. ^ 

3904 Scene — "Falls on the River Derwent," in water colour, painted 

by the late T. E. Chapman. 

3905 Scene in Water Colours — "Waterfall at Tolosa in Humphrey's 

Rivulet," painted by the late T. E. CSiapman. 

3906 "Scenes in Devonshire," in water colours (3), painted by the late 

T. K Chapman. 

MEREDITH, MRS. CHARLES, Orford, Taamania. 

3907 ''White and Red Waratah Flowers (EUopea Speciosissima) of 

New South Wales." 

3908 " Group of Tasmanian Fish. " 

Both painted by exhibitor; 

SOLLY, MRS. AMELLA., Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3909 Water Colour . Painting, "Neath Castle, Wales," painted by 

exhibitor. 

STTJBBS, MISSES, Tasmania. 
3909a "Scene on the Scheldt." 

STTJBBS, THOMAS, Tasmania. 
3909b " Yiew of Ben Lomond, Tasmania." 

Group 82. 

HULL, MRS. HUGH, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3910 Pencil Drawing, "Avoca by Moonlight," 

Group 83. 

RANDALL, A., C.E., Engineer to the Hobart Town Waterworks, 

Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3911 Chart of the Hobart Town Waterworks. 

BIBBS, T. F., Launceston. 
3911a Chart of LsMinceston. 



iSys* »r* 



BAKDAIX^ ALFRED. HoUxi lV>i 
3911b Flm of Oie Wktonrarks of Hobwi T^yvu soul s«Uirlt$. 

BAILT, H. H., Hoburt Tbva. 

3912 Plate cf FboUignphk BemhniMit Portraits. 

3913 Book cf mioiogn^luc Pordnits. 

3914 Two Books of Photag»{4iic Tiews in T^snuuiiis exhiluW bj tW 



CASTRAY^ L. R, Hobart Town» Tksmaniiu 

3915 Photogn^ of Castnj Espkiuuie, Hob«rt Towiu 

CLIFFORD, &» Hobart Town, Tasmania* 

3916 Two Books of Photographic Views in Tasmania, exhildted by tho 

artistb 

CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF HOBART TOWN. 

3917 Plate of Photogi-aphic Views of the City of Hobai-t Towiu 

HULL, HUGH M., Hobtirt Town, T^ismania, 

3918 Portrait of last Tasmanian Aboriginal Man, '^Billey Lamiey/* 

photographed £vom life by Charles WooUey, Fi-amed iu 
mnskwood. 

3919 Portraits of Aboriginal Women, « Wapperty" and " Patty." Pho- 

tographed from life by Charles Woolley. Fi^amed in slieotvk 
wood. 

3920 Portraits— "Lalla Rookh" and "Bessy Qarke." Photogwiphod 

from life by Charles Woolley. Framed in myrtlewood. 

TONDEUR & LEMPRIERE, Melbourne. 

3920a Photographs of the Biitish and Tasmanian Charcoal Iran Coni" 
pany (Limited), Tasmania. 

WHERRITT, C, Hobart Town, Tasmania. 

3921 Photographic Portraits, exhibited by the artist. 



DEPARTMENT 26. 

Group 88. 

TASMANIA, COMMISSIONERS OF. 
3922 Statistical Tables of Tasmania. 



280 CATALOGUE OF THE 

SOUTH AUSTRALIA— NORTHERN 

TERRITORY. 

The Northern Territory of South Australia embraces an immense 
tract of country, and contains an area of 340,000,000 acres. This part 
of the continent, though as yet little known, will without doubt soon 
command attention, from the importance of its geographical position, 
situated as it is in close proximity to the fertile islands belonging to the 
Govemment of the Ketherlands-India, China, the Straits Settlement, 
Borneo, &c. The climate is tropical, the soil generally rich. All the 
tropical and semi-tropical fruits and plants thrive, and the grasses grow 
from five to seven feet higL During the summer months a dearth of 
water is a decided drawback to settlement, but what there is is good ; 
none appears to be brackish, a fact perhaps to be accounted for by the 
absence of salt. 

The settlement is presided over by a Besident, who is dependent for 
his instructions upon the Govemment at Adelaide. In the year 1872 a 
Land Act was passed by the South Australian Parliament^ enabling 
persons to select land to the extent of two square miles or 1280 acres, at 
an annual rent of 6d. per acre, with a right of pmx;hase at any time 
during the currency of a ten years' lease, at 7s. 6d. per aci-e, or to select 
any extent of land at 7s. 6d. per acre, cash, and without conditions of 
settlement or cultivation. For plantation purposes 1280 acres may be 
selected at the same rental, or if one-half of the land be in cultivation at 
the end of five years, and the land enclosed, the land gi*ant from the 
Crown will issue without any further payment beyond the five yearly 
payments of 6d. per acre. The construction of the telegraph line across 
the continent, which unites Australia with the other parts of the world, 
has tended to bring the settlement into notice. The laying of the sulh 
marine cable between Port Darwin and Banjoewangie, and thence to the 
Eastern world, was commenced in October, 1871, and completed in 
November. Owing to the difficulty of obtaining white labour, Chin&se 
and coolies have been introduced under the auspices of the Government. 
It has been proposed, with a view of encouraging trade, to make Port 
Darwin a free port. During 1875 the Govemment intend expending 
£15,000 on public works and buildings in the Territory. The chief 
harbour is Port Darwin, into which vessels of any tonnage can enter and 
beat out with safety. The Eiver Roper is navigable for nearly 100 
miles, and the Liverpool, South Alligators, East Alligators, the Adelaide 
and Laby Bivers are also navigable to from 20 to 40 miles. 

The principal resources of the Northern Territory are at present its 
minerals and timber. Important discoveries of gold, copper, tin, and 
lead point to a great mineral future for this part of Australia. It<8 
gold mines have ali*eady attracted attention, and are being actively 
worked. Numerous quartz reefs have been discovered, the returns from 
which are of an encouraging char^^cter. 

The Northern Territory has contributed valuable specimens of her 
resources and productions to the present Exhibition. Samples of the 



Dmatcou>NLa. exhibition, 1^75- ^^^ 



various indigenous woods — polislied and in their nahuml state, auriferous 
quartz, oonJ, and shells will be found fully represented. 

The collection of these exhibits is mainly due to the exertions of Mr. 
J. G. Knight, a graitleman whose name has been long and favoiu^bly 
identified wilji Australian Exhibitions, and who, by the seal he has 
displayed on this occasion, has given a practical prcx^ of the warm in- 
terest he still takes in the progress and adranoement of Victoria. 



DEPARTMENT 1. 
Group 1. 

ABBOTT, JONES & BUCHANAN, Northern Territory. 

3923 Samples of Copper Ore from Pine Creek. 

AYLIFFE, T. H., Noi-them Temtoiy. 

3924 Specimens from Prospectiog Claim, about foiu' miles N.W. of 

Union, taken from smfaoe, width of leader 10 inches, 
traceable for 80 yards, beaiing N.N.W. First ciaisliing 
of 19 J tons yielded 66 oz. of gold. 

BECKER, T., Northern Tenitory. 

3925 Quartz fiom Yam Creek, six feet from siuiace. 

BRESE, WILLIAM, & STARKE, AUGUST, Noi-Uiern Territory. 

3926 Specimens from Extended Union Pix)si)ectoi's* Claim, fiom a deptli 

of 40 feet, leader 6 to 18 inches, titiceable for 40 yaitls, but 
extent unknown, beaiing W. ; crushing of 7^ tons yieldwi 
609 ozs. of gold. 

CALEDONIA NEW AMALGAMATED COMPANY (per A, T 

Forbes), Northern Territory. 

3927 Specimens of Quartz from Caledonia Reef, near Union, taken 

from a depth of 40 feet, width of reef 3ft. 6in. 

CLARKE, FRANCIS, & SONS, Adelaide, South Austi-alia. 
3927a Iron Ores. 

GOLDEN STREAM CLAIM, Northern Territory. 

3928 Sample of Washdirt, 16 feet from smfaoe, stratum above, hard 

blue slate, bearing of lead N. and S. (sample in box). 

GRIFFITHS, W. K., Northern Territory. 

3929 Specimens from No. 1 South Union, taken five feet from suifacO) 

width two feet, bearing N.N.W. 

GROVE HILL COMPANY (per W. R. Griffiths), Noi-them Tenitory. 

3930 Specimens of Auriferous Quartz, taken 16 feet from suifacts 

width of reef two to five feet, reef can be traced 500 yarclH 
on Company's ground. 



282 CATALOGUE OF TITB 

OUNN, J. H., Northern Territory. 

3931 Tributers' Specimens of Auriferous Quartz, from Britannia Beef, 

Howley District, taken from a depth of 15 feet, reef about 
one foot thick, first crushing of 33 tons yielded over 7 oz. of 
gold to the ton, the second crushing of 26 tons gave 5 oz. 15 
dwt; bearing N. and S. 

GRIFFITH, W. R., Northern Territory. 

3932 Specimen of Quartz, from No. 3 South Union, from a depth of 

5 feet, several leaders all showing gold — bearing N.N.W. by 
S.S.E. Breadth varies from 2 feet to 2 inches; two of these 
leaders form one the foot and the other the hanging wall 
of what appears the formation of a reef about 9 feet broad 
on surface, and 7 feet at a depth of 12 feet; between the 
two leaders there are bunches of sandstone^ quartz, and a 
conglomeration of both. Gold shows freely, but mostly 
loose, and principally on the gapan. 

KNIGHT, J. G., Government Architect, Northern Territory. 

3933 Samples of Copper and other Ores. 

3934 Specimens of Soils and Rocks of economic value, including 

earths, sands, clays, slate, sandstone, granite, whinstones, 
limeshell, ant hill, beach pebbles, &c, 

LEWIS, JOHN, Northern Territory. 

3935 Specimens of Auriferous Quartz, from Pine Creek. 

MILLER, MESSRS. C. «k J., Northern Territory. 

3936 Specimens of Unbleached Coral. 

MANDERS, — , Northern Territory. 

3937 Small Specimen of Carving on Claystone, for the purpose of 

showing the quality of the stone. 

MENGHINE, BERNARDO, Pine Creek, Northern Territory. 

3938 Specimens of Auriferous Quartz obtained from the Empire Claim' 

from a depth of 10 feet; width of reef about 4 feet 6 inches' 
Yield of gold from stone already crushed, 4 oz. to the ton. 

NEW TELEGRAPH COMPANY, Northern Territory. 

3939 Specimens of Auriferous Quartz, from a depth of 40 feet; width 

of reef, 6 feet. Good payable claim. 

OLDHAM, F. B., Northern Territory. 

3940 Samples of Iron Ore from Paqualin's Hump. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 875. 283 

SANDY CREEK PBOSPBCTING CLAIM, Nortliem Territory. 

3941 Sample of Wash Pirt, one foot thick, off marl and slate bottoms. 

Stratum above ground very similar to wash^dirt. Depth 
from surface, 14 feet; bearing N. (Sample in box.; 

SHEPPEED, E., Northern Tenitory. 

3942 Surface Stones impregnated with fine gold, from John Bull Beef, 

Howley District. 

SANDY CREEK PUDDLING COMPANY (per James Johnson), 

Northern Territory. 

3943 Sample of Auriferous Washdirt, from a depth of 20 feet, bearing 

N. and S« Strata above, bluish gravelly clay (sample in 
bag). 

STRAFFORD, — , Esq.,'K A. & S. Bank, Adelaide, South Australia. 
3943a Specimens of Gold, with Copper, in Quartz, from the Lady Alice 

Mine, near Gawler. 
3943b Specimens of Gold, with Bismuth, from the Balhannah Mine, 

Mount Barker, Adelaide. 

TRIPP, J. P., Northern Territory. 

3944 Specimens of Stone from No. 2, North Lady Alice, Union Reef, 

taken from surface. The reef traceable for 100 yards; width 
15 or 16 inches. Average of crushings, 2 o£. to the ton. 

3945 Specimens of Quartz from Lady Alice Reef, largely impregnated 

with mundic, (be. 

UNION PROSPECTORS' COMPANY (per Adam Johns), Northern 

Territory. 

3946 Specimens taken from a depth of 60 feet; width of reef, 6 to 12 

feet; extent not known; bearing N. by W. Crushing of 
10 tons yielded 770 oz. ; 170 tons, 250 oz. ; 172 tons, 622 oz. ; 
322 tons, 556 oz. 

WHITELAW, E. H.^ Pine Creek, Northern Territory. 

3947 Specimens of Quartz from leader on surfa(!e, 18 inches to 2 feet 

wide. 

3948 Specimens of Lead Ore. 

WESTCOTT, J. S., ik ViSENDUNGER, T., Northern Territory. 

3949 Auriferous Quartz from No. 4 North Union, taken, some from 

surfaoe and some from a depth of 40 feet, several leaders 
varying from 10 to 18 inches. Ten tons from surfieu^e 
yielded 10 oz. of gold. 



DEPABTHBNT 2. 

Gkoup 5. 

FREW, JOHN. (Manager E., S., and A. C. Bank), Northern Territory. 
3950 Sorghum, grown in Bank garden, on red ferruginous earth. 



284 CATALOGUE OF THE 

GOMEZ, EMANUEL, Northern Territory. 

3951 Sample of Maize (first attempt at growing). 

HUGHES, W. B., Government Gardener, Palmerston, Nortliem 

Territory. 

3952 Samples of Sugar Cane, not cultivated. 

3953 Yams. 

3954 Sweet Potatoes. 

3955 Arrowroot. 

3956 Batavian Beans. 

3957 Native Grass, <Smj. 

KELSEY, J. E., Northern Territory. 

3958 Bed Berries, suitable for beans, called by the natives '^ Manoel 

Manoel." 

Group 6. 

HUGHES, W. B., Government Gardener, Palmerston, Northern 

Territory. 

3959 Seeds of Corkscrew Palm. 

Group 7. 

HUGHES, W. B., Government Gardener, Palmerston^ Northern 

Territory. 

3960 Collection of Fungi. 

PERRIN, G. & H., Poi-t Darwin, South Australia. 

3960a Beef Wood. 

3960b Native Water Bottles. 

SCOTT, G. B., Government Resident, Northern Territory. 

3961 Specimens of Useful and Ornamental Woods, chiefly collected by 

W. B. Hughes, Government (Jardener. 



DEPARTMENT 6. 
Group 17. 

KNIGHT, Ji G., Northern Territory. 



3962 Fibres, «kc. 



DEPARTMENT & 

Group 19. 

BEATSON, D. L., Northern Territory. 
3963 Collection of Lepidoptei-ous Insects collected about Palmerston* 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 385 

HUGHES, H. B., Northern TerritoTj. 

3964 Collection of Snakes. 

PEREIN, GEORGE S. £ H. W., Port Darwin, South Australia. 

3964a Alligator^s Head — ^This animal was 16 feet long when alive, 
and was captured near Tumbling Waters, a few miles above 
Southport, 25 miles from Port Darwin. 

3964b Three Centipedes, from 4 to 9 inches long, when alive. 

Group 20. 

BEDNALL, W. T., Northern Temtory. 

3965 Conchological Specimens peculiar to the Northern Tenitory. 

CARDWELL, ROBERT, Noi-them Temtoiy. 

3966 " Trepang," cured at the Fisheiy, Port Essington. 

KNIGHT, J. G., Noi-them Territory. 

3967 Turtle Shells. 

3968 Crocodile Eggs. 



DEPARTMENT 10. 

Group 23. 
PERRIN, GEORGE S. & H. W., Port Darwin, South Australia. 
3968a Bridle and !3it, from Island of Timor. 



3969 Aboriginal Ornaments. 



DEPARTMENT 13. 

Group 33. 

KNIGHT, J. G, Northern Tenitory. 



DEPARTMENT 14. 

Group 38. 

PERRIN, GEORGE S. & H. W., Port Darwin, South AustraHa. 

3969a Native Bag iised by Lubras, string made of human hair and 

bark. 
3969b Native String Ornaments, <kc. 



DEPARTMENT 18. 
Group 49. 

KNIGHT, J. G., Northern Tenitory. 
3970 Aboriginal Weapons. 



286 CATALOGUE OF THE 

PERRIN, GEORGE a & H. W., Fori Dorwm, South Australia. 

39 70a Set of Speai-s, single, double, and treble pronged. 

d970B Set of Spears, flint headed. 

3970c Shear-bladed Spear. 

d970D Wommeras, or Throwing Stidu (oommon). 

3970s Wommeras, for throwing light hunting spears. 

3970f Bow and Poisoned Arrows fi*om Timor. 

Most of the above weapons have been used in warfeure bj the 
Larrakeyah tribe, or Port Darwin black, against a neigh- 
bouring tribe called the Woolners, who are both numerous 
and warlike. 



DEPARTMENT 20. 

Group 55. 

PERRIN, GEORGE S. & H. W., Port Darwin, South Australia. 
3970g Canoe made by Native of . Larrakeyah tribe. 



DEPARTMENT 25. 
Group 81. 

FOELSCHE, PAUL, Palmei-ston, Northern Territory. 
Twenty-four Views of Palmerston and Surrounding Scenery, the 
work of exhibitor: — 

3971 Camp, with Fort Hill. 

3972 View of Palmerston, from Fort Hill, looking North. 

3973 Steamship Tararua at Port Darwin. 

3974 Landing-place at Poii; Darwin, west side of Fort Hill. 

3975 Esplanade, looking South-west. 

3976 New Police Station (unfinished) comer of Esplanade and 

Mitchell-street. 

3977 Mitchell-street, looking North-west. 

3978 „ „ South-east. 

3979 "The Residence." 

3980 Mitchell-street and Esplanade. 

3981 Telegraph Buildings. 

3982 Telegraph Station. 

3983 Mango Tree at the Old Settlement, Port Essington, abandoned 1849. 

3984 Tomb, Old Settlement, Port Essington. 

3985 Port Darwin Natives. 
3986 

3987 Peers Well, Garden and Hospital. 

3988 Hospital. 

3989 Telegi-aph Allotment and Buildings. 

3990 Wesleyan Chapel and Mission-house. 

3991 Mr. John Lindsay's Stor^, Mitchell* sti^eet. 

3992 English, Scottish, and Australian Chartered Bank, Smith-street. 

3993 Mr. Joseph Shelton's Store, Bennett-street 

3994 Telegraph Station-master's Residence. 



iSr^ ;^^ 



M .l>< 



STRAITS 

Owing to the mt€Te>t tak^i bv the late Gv^vwikc v^ the Struts 
Settlement, Sir Andrew Clarke, the list of exhibits at the Inter- 
colonial Exhibition of 1S75 has be^^i consideTabiv inctx'tiks^Hl iu 
number and valae by the ct«tril:»utions frv^ou Singajv>re. Siuipfc- 
pore is one oi several dependencies called the Straits Settlements 
and is an island on the soath>westem extr^mitT of the Straits of 
Malacca. The circnmferaice of the British settlement is lil> 
miles, and is composed of about seventy-five islands ; the chief of 
these is separated from the main-land by a strait, which in the 
early period of European navigation was the thoroughfare from 
India to China. But the commercial highway between the 
eastern and western portions of maritime Asia now passes along 
the south side of the island, on which the town is built The 
settlement was founded in 1819, the islands being covered with 
primeval forest, and the only inhabitants being a few Malay 
fishermen. The right of the British to found a settlement was 
disputed by the Netherlands Government, on the ffround of a 
prior cession to them by the native sovereign. The objection was 
withdrawn, and Singapore and numerous of the adjacent isles wei^ 
by a treaty concluded in 1824, ceded to the East India Company. 
Singapore from its foundation has always been a free port, open to 
flags of any nation and without either export or import duties on 
goods. The only charge made Ls a small one for ships, whicli goes 
towards the maintenance of lighthouses. To this, combined with 
the manifold advantages of its position, it is indebted for the mpid 
progress of its commercial prosperity. Singapore is tlie entirp^t 
in which are brought together the products and manufactures 
of the western world, of India, Cochin China, Siam, tlie Malay 
Peninsula, and of the Eastern Archipelago, from its western 
limits in Sumatra to the meridian of New Guinea and the Philip- 
pine Islands. The Straits Settlement is of itself rich in products. 
Tin is found in Malacca and at Penang; the former being re- 
markable for keeping its brightness, while the latter Ir, on ac- 
count of its greater purity, of more commercial value. Singa))()re 
pepper is the largest product of the Straits, and is nioHtly 
produced in Johore and Karimons. The pepper is both black 
and white, the difference in colour arisirig from tlie fact of the 
outer skin being removed in washing. Tapioca is pro(luc(?(l in 
Singapore, Malacca, and Penang, while supplies of hr^o flour 
are derived from Borneo. The production of the latter artic^h? Ih 
rapidly ina-easing. Coffee is grown in the CelebcH, at Timor, Dcili, 
and Bally, and to a small extent in Sumatra. The production in 
the Straits is restricted to a limited quantity iroin Penang. 
Borneo also yields white gutta and an article called Boruro 



288 CATALOGUE OF THE 



I 



rubber. From the island of Banda is derived the chief supply of 
nutmegs, although they are produced at Penang, Province Wel- 
lesley, and on the west coast of Sumatra. The attempts to 
acclimatise the nutmeg tree at Singapore have as yet all been 
failures. Mace worth 3s. per lb. is derived from Banda, and a fine 
description of cloves from Penang. An enormous quantity of 
copal is produced at Celebes, while gambouge striclse, produced 
by an insect and formed on twigs of trees, comes from Siam and 
Cochin China. Teel-seed is exported in great quantities from 
Siam to the south of Europe, where an oil is extracted to 
imitate olive oil. Sugar is derived from Penang, and supplies of 
cutch come from Burmah, and a vegetable tallow principally 
from Sumatra. Everyone is acquainted with Malacca canes and 
mttans, which, together with Chichi canes, form no inconsiderable 
portion of the Straits exports. Bete-nut, much used by the 
natives as a masticatory in conjunction with serai leaf, gambler, 
and lime, is another article of export. 

Exhibits of all these various novelties of products and speci- 
mens of plants have by the kindness of Messrs. Bonstead and Co. 
and Mr. D. Little, the chairman of the Raffles Library, Museum 
and Garden, Singapore, been collected and forwarded u> 
Melbomne, with full information as to their commercial value ; 
particulars of which will be found in the Catalogue. 



BONSTEAD & CO., Singapore. 

3995 No. 1. Sample of Malacca Tin. 

3996 No. 2, Sample of Penang Tin. 

These are sent to show the shape of the slabs. Malacca tin 
is usually moulded in slabs weighing about 84 catties = 
llSlhs., and Penang in slabs of 50 to 75 catties. 

3997 No. 3, Cutting of Malacca Tin. 

3998 No. 4, Cutting of Penang Tin. 

These show the difference in quality between the two descrip- 
tions. The Malacca, it will be noticed, shows considerable 
roughness, caused by the presence of impurities, while the 
Penang is smooth where bent, being more pure. For this 
reason the latter description of tin is preferred for most 
purposes, but the Malacca in some cases is taken in pre- 
ference in consequence of keeping its brightness longer. 
Total production in 1874 was about 129,000 piculs = 13,00(1 
tons ; of which was received at Penang from Laroot^ Junk, 
Ceylon, and Perak, 159,000 piculs; and at Singapore^ from 
Malacca, 60,000 piculs. The exports were as rollows: — 
United Kingdom, 79,000 piculs; Continent of Europe, 
3000 piculs; United States, 47,000 piculs; China, 70,00C* 
piculs; India, 20,000 piculs. Owing to the discorery of 



INTERCOLONIAL KXHIBITION, 1875. 289 

tin in Australia the value of this article lias fallen greatly 
of late years, and the present cost is only 24| dols. per 
picul, equal to £93 per ton in London. On 26th May, 
1875, the })rice had further fallen to 22;^ dols. 

3999 Sample "No, 5, Singapore Gambier. 

4000 „ No. 6, Bhio Cute Gambier No. 2. 

4001 „ No. 7, Bhio Cute Gambier No. 1. 

These samples represent the three descriptions of this important 
article, so much used for tanning and dyeing. The exports 
from Singapore in 1874 were 621,000 piculs = 31,300 tons, 
divided as follows: — ^To United Kingdom, 334,000 piculs; 
Continent of Europe, 96,000 piculs; United States, 92,000 
piculs. In addition to the above there are large quantities 
exported to neighouring markets for dyeing, tanning, and 
also, of the finer kinds, for eating; the natives use it in 
conjunction with serai leaf, lime, and betel. 

4002 Sample No. 8, Singapore Pepper. This is the most important 

article produced in the Straits, of what is called Singapore 
quality ^produced in Johore and the Karimons); an average 
crop will be — 120,000 piculs, and of Bhio, which is inferior, 
30,000 piculs. Penang draws its supplies mainly from Su- 
matra, and an average crop is about 160,000 piculs; but for 
the last two years the Acheen war has greatly interfered 
with the production. Exports from Singapore and Penang 
in 1874 were, in all, 283,000 piculs = 17,000 tons, divided 
as follows: — England, 116,000 piculs; Continent of 
Europe, 26,000 piculs; United States, 63,000 piculs ; China, 
51,000 piculs; India, 27,000 piculs. The price of Singa- 
pore Pepper is now 11*75 dols., 5fd. per lb. in London; 
the price has very considerably advanced during the past 
few years, owing to the increasing demand for the article 
all over the world without an adequate increase in the 
production. 

4003 Sample No. 9, Singapore White Pepper. This is the product 

of the same plant as Black Pepper, an'd the difference in 
colour is in consequence of the outer skin being removed 
by washing. The supply is regulated entirely by the 
demand, as producers, as soon as they find that the white 
pepper pays Letter than black, at once make this descrip- 
tion, ^lack Pepper will give from 60 to 7b per cent, of 
white, according to its condition. Exports in 1874 from 
Singapore 33,000 piculs = 2000 tons, divided as follows: — 
England, 30,000; Continent of Europe, 2000 piculs; 
America, 1000 piculs. 

4004 Sample No. 10, Flake Tapioca. 
4006 „ „ 11, Pearl Tapioca. 
4006 „ „ 12, Tapioca Flour. 

This article is produced in Singapore, Malacca, and Penang. 
Total exports of Flake and Pearl in 1874 were 63,000 piculs, 
equal to 3800 tons, divided as follows:— United Kingdom, 



290 CATALOGUE OP THE 

49,000 piculs; Continent, insignificant; United States, 
14,000 piculs. The price of Flake and Pearl runs from 4 
dols. to 5 dols., and tne present value is 4i- dols. per picid. 

4007 Sample No. 13, Borneo Sago Flour. Supplies of this are 

derived from Borneo. The production is largely increasing; 
in 1874 the total exports were 230,000 piculs, equal to 
13,800 tons, divided as follows : — United Kingdom, 
215,000 piculs; Continent, 5000 piculs; United States, 
10,000 piculs. The value is now 2 dols. 50 c. per picul, 
equal to 13s. 3d. per cwt in England. 

4008 No. 14, Small Pearl Sago. The production of this is entirely 

regulated by the demand, as the supply of raw material 
is to all intents unlimited. The present value is 
3 dols. 25 c. per picul = 16s. 6d. in England. Exports in 
1874 were— 64,000 piculs = 3840 tons, divided as fol- 
lows: — United Kingdom, 57,000 piculs; Continent of 
Europe, 5500 piculs; United States, 1500 piculs. 

4009 No. 15, Bontyne Coffee. 

4010 No. 16, Timor Deli Coffee. 

4011 No. 1 7, Bally Coffee. Our supplies of this article are derived 

from the Celebes, Timor Deli, and Bally, and to a small 
extent from Sumatra. The production in the Straits is 
quite insignificant, being restricted to a few hundred piculs 
yearly from Penang. There is no doubt whatever tnat if 
the Malay Peninsula is opened up to trade, as there is 
every likelihood of it being before long, we will be receiving 
large supplies of a very fine coffee from that district, as the 
country is admirably suited for its production. Total 
exports in 1874 were 32,000 piculs = 1900 tons, divided 
as follow: — United Kingdom, 15,000 piculs; Continent of 
Europe, 8000 piculs; United States, 9000 piculs. The 
present value of Bontyne Coffee, which is the best obtain- 
able here, is 20 dols. 50 c, equal to 83s. 9d. per cwt. in Eng- 
land. On 26th May, 1875, the price had risen to 23 dols. 

4012 No. 18, No. 1, 70 dols. 

4013 No. 19, No. 2, 46 dols. 

4014 No. 20, No. 3. 

4015 No. 21, Soonie Kayong. 

4016 No. 22, White Gutta. The above samples show the principal 

varieties of this article and their present values. Our 
supplies are principally derived from Borneo, the riches of 
which island we are only beginning to know something of. 
The exports in 1874 were 20,600 piculs = 1230 tons, against 
37,000 piculs in 1873, thus showing a considerable falling- 
off in the demand. 

4017 No. 23, Borneo Rubber, a sample of fair quality. This article, 

as the name implies, is produced in Borneo. The value of 
fair quality, present value, is about 45 dols. per picul. 

4018 No. 24, Indiaruboer. A sample of fair quality; present value 

is about 40 dols. per picul. 



IXTKBCQLOSIAJL BXJUBITWeC^ lS^> ^l 






4019 NoL35,n«itdrtikeX«feM|pl^Kfli,slM»viiq^dM 

4020 Na 96, Nvtflwss m ^ke slwlL 

4021 No. 27, Xiitne^of Commncef lined to pi^Tettt viiwii^^ CKir 

sapplies are prindinllT deiired fironi tiie Ishttd <Q4r BmiiIii 
but Penaiigv Ptonace WdlesIeT, uid tiie £it^ Omk^I «i|' 
Sumatra also produce some. The calture of thb IK« liaa 
been triedin Singapore, bat without snccetss^ Th» pi«s«nl 
Talne is about 85 dbls. p«r picul for 110 to the Ik; as. p«r 
lb. in England. Total enorts in 1874 wer^ about 4000 
picols (240 tons), of which bj fiur the largest portion went 
to America. 

4022 No. 28, Banda Mace, worth 85 doI& per picul, 3& per lb. in 

England, total exports from Singapore and Penang in 1$?! 
were 700 picols = 42 tons; England and Amerioi takiiig 
about 350 piculs each. 

4023 No. 29, Amboina OoTes, worth about 45 dol& per picid ; the finest 

description is obtained in Penang, where, on an average> 
about 300 piculs are obtained jearij« 

4024 Na 30, Celebes Copal, worth about 5 dols. per pioul. The pro-^ 

duction of this article Yari^ Teij much, taere is an enor* 
mous quantity of this article in the Celebes, and every 
time the price advances to about present value, supplies 
increase. 

4025 No. 31, Palembang Sumatra Gum Danmar, worth at present 

about 13^ dols. per picul, but 10 dols. may be considered 
an average value. 

4026 No. 32, Gamoouge (Siam), worth at present about 60 dols, per 

picul; the cylindrical shape of this article is given by its 
being run into bamboos irom the trees. 

4027 No. 33, Siam Striclae, worth 24 dols. per picul. This is j)ro- 

duced by an insect, and is formed on twig's of trees; sup- 
plies are derived from Siam and Cochin China. 

4028 No. 34,Siam Teel Seed. Worth 2 dols. 85 c. per picul This article 

is exported largely from Siam to tlie soutli of Europe, 
where an oil is made from it to imitate Olive Oil. 

4030 No. 3«, Pmuig No. 2 Sug». ■) „ ^ j>„,^ j„ „ ^^ p.^,j 

4031 No. 37, Cutch. Our supplies are derived from Burinali, und tlie 

quantity varies very much. Present value is dol». per 
picul, but this is considerably over the average cost, which 
is from 4 dels, to 4-^ dols. 

4032 No. 38, Cubebs. Produced in Java. Present value is (!J doln, 

per picul. No attention is now i)aid to the cultivation 
of this article. 

4033 No. 39, Vegetable Tallow. This article is brought i)rincii)ally 

from Sumatra. The present value is 8^ dols. i)er j)icul, 

4034 No. 39a. Value is 10 dols. 50 c. per picul. 

4035 No. 40. Chasserian Tapioca, larffe flake. Value 5 doln. 

4036 No. 41. „ „ medium flake. ,, 4 dolH. 60 o. 

v2 



292 CATALOGUE OP THE 

4037 No. i2. Gliasserian Tapioca, small flake. Value 4 dols. 50 c. 

4038 No. 43. „ „ flour. „ 4 dols. 25 c. 

4039 No. 44. Rice, Moulamein. Value, 68 dols. percoyan of 40 piculs- 

4040 No. 46. „ Rangoon. „ 61 „ „ „ 

4041 No. 46. „ „ „ 60 „ 

4042 No. 47. „ Siam. „ 47 „ „ „ 

4043 No. 48. „ Sai^n. „ 66 „ „ „ 

4044 No. 49, Rattans, Feelye. Value 6^ dols. per picul. 

4045 No. 50, „ Feelye Oolo, „ „ „ 

4046 No. 61, „ Banjermassin, „ „ „ 

4047 No. 52, „ Koomie, „ „ „ 

4048 No. 53, „ Jambee, „ „ „ 

4049 No. 54, „ Pagartan, „ „ „ 

4050 No. 55, „ Kayong, „ „ „ 

4051 No. 56, „ Kooboo, „ „ „ 

4052 No. 57, „ Passir, „ „ „ 

4053 No. 58, „ Coarse Passir, „ 3^ „ 

4054 No. 59, Malacca Canes, unprepared, 16 dols. per 100. 

4055 No. 60, Malacca Canes, prepared, 24 dols. per 100. 

4056 No. 61, Chichi Canes, 12 dols. per 100. 

4057 No. 62, Bete But, value 1 dol. 12^ c. per picul, the fruit of the 

Areca Catechu, much used by the natives as a masticatory, 
in conjunction with serai leaf, gambier, and lime. 

RAFFLES LIBRARY, MUSEUM, AND GARDEN, Singapore. 

4058 Ancectochilus Lowii. 

4059 „ Oreliani. 

4060 „ Dawsonianas. 

4061 Macodes pelota. 

4062 Oissus porphyllorum. 

4063 Oissus species from Borneo. 

4064 Cypripedum concolor nireum. 

4065 Cypripedum Hookeri. 

1066 Nephelaphyllum scapigerum. 

4067 Kompferia Shicus. 

4068 Saccolabium Crookshanki. 

4069 Dendrobium Daii. 

4070 Caryota lobolifera. 

4071 Arenga saccharifera. 

4072 Areca Malayensis. 

4073 Borassus flabelliformis. 

4074 Varieties of Calamus. 

4075 Nepenthes RaflSesiana. 

4076 „ distillatoria. 

4077 „ ampullacea. 

4078 Pure Tin from Perak, Malay Peninsula. 

4079 Lead Ore from Patain Galena Mining Co. 

4080 Raffles Library and Museum, Singapore, Report, 1874, and other 

pamphlets. 

4081 Ganore, Dyak. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 293 

4082 Passenger Boat^ Singapore. 

4083 Laucha, Padang. 

4084 Lannoon, Pirate Boat. 

4085 Badar, Fabing Fingi. 

4086 Laucba, Padang. 

4087 Sampan Pandak, Dobas Boat. 

4088 Sampan Kolak or Fishing Boat. 

4089 Sampan Rota, Kalong or Fishing Stake Boat. 

4090 Sampan Jaring, or Net Fishing Boat. 

4091 Malacca Fishing Boat. 

BRODIE, W. G., Kuching Sarwak, Borneo. 

409S Antimony Specimens. 

4093 Cinnabar irom Borneo. 



JAPAN. 

It is only within the last few years that a more accurate know- 
ledge of the earlier Japanese history, than is contained in the old 
booKS written in European languages, has been obtainable. Now, 
however, every year adds to the amount of information, by the 
translation of native historical works, the chief of which is Nihon 
Ouaishi (published in 1827) containing twenty- two volumes, and 
which occupied the author twenty yeara in compilation. This is 
the chief source of Japanese education, and from which they 
derive their acquaintance with the history of their own country. 
The earliest history of Japan is wrapped in mystery. The tradition 
is that after the erection of heaven and earth, an island of soft earth 
swam upon the water like a fish. At the same time between heaven 
■and earth, a thing was bom similar to the plant Ashi. This was 
changed into a god, and he was the first of seven celestial spirits. 
He reigned ten millions of years, as did also his two successors. 
The first three spirits were self-bom and were males. The fourth, 
fifth, and sixth spirits had female companions and reproduced by 
mutual contemplation. After a fabulous number of years arose a 
male spirit Izanagi-no-Mikoto and a female spirit Izanami-no- 
Mikoto. To them were bom two daughters, the Sun Goddess 
and the Moon Goddess, and two sons. After living on earth for 
many years Izanagi and Izanami returned to heaven, and it is 
asserted that the present Emperor of Japan is descended without 
a single break from the " Sun Goddess." This is the legendary 
accoimt of the foimdation of the Japanese Empire. It is not 
known whence the invaders came who dispossessed the aborigines 
of the land now called Japan. There is certamly Chinese, Mongolian, 
and Corean blood in their veins, and as it seems Malay also. The 
first mortal ruler of the country was Jimnu, who probably came 



294 CATALOGUE OF THE 

from Asia. He it was who established the Kioto or capital. 
From the aborigines who remained attached to their native soil, 
and who became the bondsmen of the conquerors with' an admix- 
ture of the invaders, sprang the flat-faced peasantry which form 
the lowest class of Japanese society. From the ranks of the 
invaders was formed the militaiy class which constituted the 
nobility of the land. The form of Government established by 
the early emperors was purely monarchical. The history of 
Japan during the seventeenth century is taken up with intestine 
broils and civil wars. The Daimios or chiefs, strong in wealth 
and the number of their followers, rose up against the emperor, 
and the struggle for ascendancy was carried on with bitterness, 
and much blood shed on both sides. Constituted authority 
appears to have at last got the upper hand, for at the end of the 
century an ordonnance was issued compelling all the daimios to 
live in Yeddo. Between the years 1859-60 Japan entered into 
diplomatic relations with other countries. It would occupy too 
much time to do anything in a short introduction like this but 
to recall the passing events of the next few years. Every one 
will no doubt remember the advances made to Japan to open her 
ports to foreign trade. How, after much demur, foreigners were 
allowed to effect settlement in the land. How some of the law- 
less natives, backed up by powerful chiefs, took the lives of 
the settlers and their dependents. Great Britain took up the 
matter warmly, and the results of Sir Rutherford Alcock's mis- 
sion to Japan, and the payment of the indemnity asked for, must 
be fresh in the minds of all students of European history. 
Japan remained for some time obstinate to the offers of inter- 
change of trade held out to it, now seeming willing to comply, 
then retreating sullenly, and negativing every advance made. At 
last a better policy prevailed, and about the year 1867, the 
Japanese ports were opened to the world. Since this time Japan 
has prospered so rapidly that she now stands in the foremost 
rank of modern states, and to the enlightened policy of govern- 
ment she owes her success. 

The power of the Mikado is absolute, and he governs through 
the medium of an executive Ministry, or Great Council, to whom 
are submitted all important measures. The provinces, of which 
there are seventy-five, are administered by prefects, whose 
position is exalted, and whose powers are most extensive. The 
Daimios, or feudal lords of Japan, an\J who seem ever ready to 
incite broils and insurrections, have been forced to surrender 
up their castles and troops to the reigning Mikado, who, 
since then, " has been pushing forward reforms of a social and of 
a political character, which have stimulated the trade and 
industry of the country, and raised the standard of education 
n ongst the people to a remarkable degree." No sooner did 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 295 

Japan come in contact with other nations than it began to 
assimilate to itself the sciences, arts, and manufactures of 
the strangers. Eaihroads were projected and carried out, 
telegraphic communication was established, lighthouses were 
erected, roads and bridges constructed, and all other appliances 
of civilisation were quickly copied. Factories were rapidly es- 
tablished, and not only were articles of commerce fashioned by 
native sldll, aided by foreign science, but the difficult branches of 
engineering were soon carried on with success, so that a great 
portion of the railway plant needed, and the engines for the 
Japanese steamers, are manufactured in the country. Deter- 
mined to master all the advantages of civilisation, embassies were 
despatched to Europe and the United States to observe and 
report upon the political institutions and the social aspects of 
the countries that they visited. One of the results of these 
observations is, it is to be presumed, that the Japanese Govern- 
ment have authorised the formation of a Parliament, consist- 
ing of two houses of legislature. The Upper House will consist 
of the heads of the departments — of which there are eight — 
and of nominees of the Mikado. The membei-s of the Lower 
House " will be elected by popular vote." 

Great attention has been paid to the education of the people. 
In 1871 a Board of Public Instruction was appointed, which not 
only established public schools, but encouraged the formation 
of private schools throughout the land. In 1873 a number of 
European professors were called to Japan, at the expense of the 
country, to teach the inhabitants the languages of the 
civilised West, while at the present time Japanese students 
are, at the public expense, studying in Europe and America. 
The principal exports of Japan are silk and tea, but the 
greatest attention is now being turned to agriculture and 
the breeding of cattle. The mines of Japan are virtually 
Government property, for the royalty payable for workij^ them 
is so large that it leaves but little margin for profit. There is 
a gold and silver mine ninety miles from the city of Osaka, 
and a gold, silver, and copper mine twenty miles north of the 
same city. The Japanese Government have piu'chased the 
machinery and apparatus lately belonging to the Hong Kong 
mint, so that they are now in a position to coin and assay 
their gold and silver. 

One of the principal native industries is cabinet-making, and 
it is wonderful how skilfully myriads of separate pieces of wood 
are blended in colour and design into one harmonious whole. 
Wood, inlaid with brass, making a sort of original ormolu work, 
shows most artistic taste and design. As artisans of potteryware 
and china, the Japanese workmen have made themselves a name. 
Nothing comes amiss to their skilful fingers, whether a vase of 



296 CATALOGUE OP THE 

coarse ware, six feet high, or the deUcately^coloured BXid chastely- 
designed ornaments that have become the fashion in modem 
boudoirs and in the china collections of cognoscenti. In the 
grotesque, too, the Japanese excel. As workers in metal they are 
proficient, and the ornaments made of a dtdl metal resembling 
platinum in everything but weight, inlaid with gold and silver 
designs of artistic value, would do honour to Albert Durer or 
Cellini. Their silk fabrics are exquisite, and their painting on 
silk is unique in its way. As manufacturers of nick-nacks — 
such as fens, cigar-cases, glove-boxes, &c. — ^they display great 
art in skilfully manipulating the most fragile materials. 

The Government of Japan, although at first afraid that they 
would be unable to take any part in the Victorian Intercolonial 
Exhibition of 1875, have made their desire to enter into 
communication with other countries subservient to their own 
convenience. Every assistance was given to the Japanese 
merchants who wished to exhibit in Melbourne, and the 
Government further gave evidence of the interest they took in 
the matter by appointing an Imperial Commission to visit 
Australia, and to represent Japan during the ExhibitioiL The 
Commissioners thus appointed, and who arrived here a few weeks 
ago, are M. Hashimoto and Harua Sakata, both gentlemen hold- 
ing high official positions in the civil service of Japan. The 
exhibits under their charge will be found to fully represent the 
industries of Japan, and are of such a nature that they cannot 
fail to attract the attention of all those who take an interest 
in the progress of manufactures and arts. 



" SHIPPO COMPANY," Japan. 

4094 Twenty Pieces of Thin Silk, various colours, 54 feet long, 

32 inches wide 

4095 Piece Brown and Gold Velvet, 54 feet long, 32 inches wide 

4096 Do. Silk, 44 feet long, 32 mches wide 

4097 Do. Striped Violet and White Velvet, 54 feet long, 32 

inches wide 

4098 Do. Silk, 72 feet long, 32 inches wide 

4099 Do. Green and Gold Velvet, 54 feet long, 32 inches wide 

4100 Do. Blue and Gold do., do. do. 

4101 Do. Silk, 56 do. do. 

4102 Do. Violet and Gold Velvet, 54 do. do. 

4103 Do. Silk, 36 do. 4o. 

4104 Do. Silk, 36 do. do. 

4105 Do. Velvet, 54 do. do. 

4106 Do. SUk, 43 do. do. 



do. 


45 do. 


do. 


45 do. 


do. 


45 do. 


do. 


45 do. 


do. 


45 do. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 297 

4107 Piece Silk, 72 feet long, 32 inches wide. 

4108 Do. Gauze, 54 do. do. 

4109 Do. SUk, 54 do, do. 

4110 Do. Black Velvet, 54 do. do. 

4111 Do. Silk, 54 do. do. 

4112 Do. Silk, 54 do. do. 

4113 Three hundred and forty-four Silk Pocket Handkerchiefs 

4114 One hundred and eleven do. do. 

4115 One hundred and forty-six do. do. 

4116 Two hundred and forty-three do. do. 

4117 Two Pieces Silk for Umbrellas, each 64 feet long, 8 inches 

wide 

4118 Nineteen Pieces White Silk Cord, 45 feet long 

4119 Do. do. Violet 

4120 Two do. Yellow 

4121 Do. do. Green 

4122 Three do. Pink 

4123 Five do. do. 

4124 Two Silk Dressing Gowns for Gentlemen 

4125 Two Do. do. 

4126 One do. do. 

4127 Two hundred and thirty Ladies' Silk Neckties, various 

colours 

4128 Ten Pieces Embroidered Silk for Cushions. 

4129 Ten Do. do. 

4130 Ten Do. do. 

4131 Three do. do. 

4132 Seven do. do. 

4133 One Piece do. 

4134 Six Copper Cigar Cases, ornamented with leather and 

various metals. Made in Tokei. 

4135 Pair Solitaires, made of shiakudo (a black metal formed 

by mixing gold and copper), inlaid with various metals. 
Made in Tokei. 

4136 Crystal Scarf Ring. Made in Tokei. 

4137 Do. do. do. 

4138 Thirty Smoking Pipes, made of brass, and orhamented 

with lacquer. Made in Tokei. 

4139 Do. do. do. 

4140 Do. do. do. 

4141 Do. do. do. 

4142 Fifteen do. do. 

4143 Fifteen Smoking Pipes, made of brass, and with chased 

work in silver. Made. in Tokei. 

4144 Two hundred Cigar Cases. Black lacquer, ornamented 

with gold lacquer. Made in Tokei. 

4145 Three Cigarette Cases. 



298 CATALOGUE OF THE 

4146 Five CSgarette Cases. 

4147 Thirty do. ornamented with leather and gold 

laeqner. Made in Tokei. 

4148 Do. do. do. 

4149 Five Card Cases. 

4150 Fifteen Cigar Cases, superior quality. Made in Tokei. 

4151 Do. do. inferior quality do. 

4152 Do. do. imitation leather do. 

4153 Ten Cigarette Cases do. do. 

4154 Fifteen Cigar eases. Tortoise-shell, ornamented with gold 

lacquer. Made in Tokei. 

4155 Seventy-six* pair Solitaires, carved ivory, inlaid with 

lacquer or metals. Made in Tokei. 

4156 Two himdred Cigar Cases, of painted Kiri (a kind of 

soft white-wood). Made in Tokei. 

4157 Three Hundred and forty-two Head-dresses, composed of 

silk, bone, &c., worn by girls between the ages of 
seven and ten. Made in Tokei. 

4158 One hundred and twenty do. do. do., do., 

worn by older girls. 

4159 Cigar Case, of basketwork, ornamented with tendrils of 

Westeria. Made in Tokei. 

4160 Eight Basketwork Cigar Cases, made of coloured whale- 

bone. Made in Tokei. 

4161 Silk Pouch, the fastening composed of lacquer and metal. 

This pouch was used by Japanese gentlemen for 
carrying small articles when they went from home, 
but went out of fashion a few years ago. 

4162 Silk Pouch, fastening of inlaid stone and ivory. Made in 

Tokei. See Lot 90. 

4163 Cigar Case, whalebone basket-work, with gold lacquer 

fastening. Made in Tokei. 

4164 Rich Silk Pouch, with ivory fastening. Made in TokeL 

4165 Twenty-four Tortoiseshell Watch Chains. Made in TokeL 

4166 Three Pairs Solitaires, gold lacquer on ivory. do, 

4167 Jwo Cigar Cases, made of Kaba (the bark of the Cherry- 

tree.) Made in Tokei. 

4168 Two do. do. do. 

4169 Six do. do. do. 

4170 Fourteen Cigar Cases of basket work, ornamented with 

tendrils of Westeria. Made in Tokei. 

4171 Twenty-six do. do. do. 

4172 Twenty- two do. do. do. 

4173 Sixty do. do. do. 

4174 Twenty-five Fans of Paper and Bamboo. 

4175 Twenty-five do. do. 

4176 Fifty do. do. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION^ l375. 299 

4177 Fifty Fans of Paper and Bamboo. 

4178 One hundred do. do. 

4179 One hundred do. do. 

4180 Twenty do. do. 

4181 Twenty do. do. 

4182 Twenty do. do. 

4183 Twenty do. do. 

4184 Fifteen Paper Fans, handles ivory, and gold lacquer. 

4185 Fifteen do. do. do. 

4186 Thirty do. do. do. 

4187 Two Paper Fans, lacquered ivory handles, inlaid with 

stone. Made in Tokei. 

4188 Two do. do. do. do. 

4189 Silk do. do. do. do. 

4190 Paper do. do. do. do. 

4191 Paper do. do. do. do. 

4192 Two Whalebone Watch Chains. Made in Tokei. 

4193 Watch Chain, made of silk and shiakudo (a black metal 

formed by mixing gold and copper). Made in Tokei. 

4194 Watch Chain, crystal and gilt metal. Made in Tokei. 

4195 Watch Chain, pearl set in shiakudo. do. 

4196 Watch Chain, shiakudo. do. 

4197 Watch Chain (large size), shiakudo. do. 

4198 Watch Chain, Tortoiseshell and gold lacquer, do. 

4199 Fan, Tortoiseshell and gold lacquer. do. 

4200 Fifty Hand Screens, of silk and lacquer. do. 

4201 Fifty do. of paper, with landscapes, figures, &c., 

painted on them. 

4202 Sixty do. do. do. 

4203 Sixty do. do. do. 

4204 Sixty do. do. do. 

4205 Fifteen hundred Hand Screens do. 

4206 Fifty Hand Screens do. do. 

4207 One hundred and ninety Hand Screens, of painted Kiri. 

4208 Twelve Boxes Tooth Powder (each box containing four 

smaller boxes). ^ 

4209 Twelve Boxes Tooth Powder (each box containmg two 

smaller boxes). 

4210 Twelve Boxes Tooth Powder. 

4211 Fifty-one Boxes Tooth Powder (each box containing 

twelve smaller boxes). 

4212 One thousand and Ten Boxes Tooth Powder. 

4213 Two hundred Leather Paper Tobacco Pouches. 

4214 Do. do. do. 

4215 Fifty do. do. 

4216 One hundred do. do. 



300 CATALOGUE OF TUB 

4217 One hundred Leather Paper Tobacco Pouches. 

4218 Five do. do. 

4219 Do. do. do. 

4220 Five Leather Paper Tobacco Pouches. 

4221 Two do. do. 

4222 Two do. do. 

4223 Two do. do. 

4224 Two do. do. 

4225 Leather Tobacco Pouch, with netzuke (a kind of large 

button, used for suspending the pouch to the belt). 

4226 Do. do. do. 

4227 Twenty Sets (of three boxes each set) Incense Boxes, 

straw-work and lacquer. Made in Ohmori. 

4228 Fivehundred andforty Pieces Wall Paper. Made in Tokei. 

4229 Two hundred and two Pieces Leather Paper for wall, 

furniture, boxes, tobacco pouches, &c. Made in Tokei. 

4230 Cabinet of Shitan (a kind of hard black wood) ornamented 

with birds and flowers of gold lacquer. 

4231 Do. do., vrith carved dragon. 

4232 Cabinet, of imitation red lacqner. 

4233 Do., black lacquer ornamented in gold lacquer. 

4234 Needle Boxes, do. do. 

4235 Do. do. do. 

4236 Do. do. do. 

4237 Card Boxes, do. do. 

4238 Glove Box, do. do. 

4239 Cabinet (with shelf), do. do. 

4240 Tortoise Shell Dish, ornamented in gold lacquer. 

4241 Sixty Lacquered Picnic Boxes, made in Aidzu. 

4242 Ten Lacquered Letter-boxes. These boxes are used bv 

Japanese of high rank to send letters, but they are 
now out of fashion. Made in Aidzu. 

4243 Cabinet of Lacquer, of best quality. 

4244 Pair Porcelain Vases, painted peony. Made in Hi^en. 

4245 Do. do. do. soldiers. Do. 

4246 Two do. do. do. peony. Do. 

4247 • Do. do. do. flower basket. Do. 

4248 Three do. do. do. Do. 

4249 Four do. do. do. flowers. Do. 

4250 Foiu" do. do. do. figures. Do. 

4251 Pair do. do. do. deer. Do. (very large.) 

4252 Do. do. do. figures. Do. 

4253 Do. do. do. do. Do. 

4254 Do. do. do. do. Do. 

4255 Do. do. do. dragon and tiger. Da, 

4256 Do. do. do. peony. Do. 
^ (One of this pair is slightly damaged.) 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 301 

4257 Pair Porcelain Vases, painted fowls. Made in Hizen. 

4258 Do. do. do. figures. Do. 

4259 Porcelain Vase, various sizes and shaped. Do. 

4260 Porcelain of various sizes and shapes. Do. 

4261 Bronze Vases, ornamented with inlaid gold and silver. 

(Subject— peacock and peahen.) 

4262 Do. do. do. 

(Subject— hunting on Fujiyama.) 

4263 Do. do. do. • 

(Subject — ^nobleman of old style.) 

4264 Bronze Vase Figures. ^ 

4265 Do. do. 

4266 Do. do. 

4267 Large Incense Burner. 

4268 SmaU do. 

4269 Fifty Sets (of three each), Leather Paper Boxes. 

4270 Do. four do. do. with glass tops. 

4271 Do. three do. do. 

4272 Ten Bamboo Basket-work Glove Boxes. 

4273 One hundred Sets (of three each) of Straw-work Trays. 

4274 Straw-work Card Case. Made in Ohmori. 

4275 Box of Mulberry-tree Wood. 

4276 Pair of Screens, made of paper, covered with gold-leaf, and 

ornamented with storks. 

4277 Cabinet, inlaid with various woods. 

4278 Small do. do. do. 

4279 Small Writing Table, do. do. 

4280 Two Ladies' Writing Tables, do. do. 

4281 Five Ladies' Writing Desks, do. do. 

4282 Lady's Writing Desk, do. do. 

4283 Thirty-two Sets (of two each) of Inlaid Trays, do. do. 

4284 Eight Round Tables, do. do. 

4285 Two Octagonal Tables, do. do. 

4286 One hun(&ed and tweniy Bread Trays, outside basket 

work, inside red lacquer. 

4287 Bamboo Basket-work Cabinet. 

4288 Cabinet, inlaid with varioas woods. 

4289 Pair Porcelain Vases. 

4290 Do. do. 

4291 Thirty Pairs Porcelain Teapots. 

4292 One hundred and thirty-six Porcelain Teapots. 

4293 One hundred and forty-four do. 

4294 One hundred and thirty-one do. 

4295 One hundred and forty-two do. 

4296 Seventy-three do. 

4297 One hundred and thirty-six do. 



302 CATALOGUE OF THE 

4298 One [hundred and thirty-seven Paper and Bamboo 

Parasols, for small girls. 

4299 Sixty Paper and Bamboo Umbrellas. 

4300 Twelve do. do. do. 

4301 Paper Box, rich gold lacquer. 

4302 Jewel Box, do. Moonlight Scene. 

4303 Do. do. Flowers and Birds. 

4304 Do. do, Chrysanthemums. 

4305 Jewel Box. do.. Flowers and Birds. 

4306 Two Cigar Stands, do.. Flowers. 

4307 Do., do., da 

4308 Mirror Case, do. 

4309 Jewel Box, do.. Fan. 

4310 Do. do.. Fans. 

4311 Five Jewel Boxes, do. 

4312 Four do., do. 

4313 Two do., do.. Landscape. 

4314 Five do., do., do. 

4315 Ten do., imitation gold lacquer. 

4316 Fifty do., lacquer. 

4317 Do. do., do. 

4318 Do. do., do. 

4319 Six do., papier-mache, ornamented with gold 

lacquer. 

4320 Writing Brush Stands, lacquer. 

4321 Twenty-four Lacquered Trays, inlaid with porcelain. 

4322 Twelve do. 

4323 Twenty-four do. 

4324 Eighteen Sets (of six each) Lacquered Trays, in various 

colours. 

4325 Six Lacquered Trays. 

4326 Forty Sets (of six each) Lacquered Sweetmeat Boxes. 

4327 Thirty-nine Sets do. do. 

4328 Fifty Small Lacquerware Dishes, used at a Japanese dinner. 

4329 Three hundred do., do. 

4330 Four Lacquered Trays, various shapes, sizes, &c. 

4331 Ten dp. do. 

4332 Do. do. do. 

4333 Five do. do. 

4334 Do. do. do. 

4335 Ten do. do. 

4336 Fifty Small Lacquered Dishes, gold ornamented. 

4337 Fifty Sets Lacquered Trays (of three each). 

4338 Fifty Red Lacquered Trays. 

4339 Fifty do. 

4340 Fifty Lacquered Trays. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1 87 5. 303 

4341 Fifteen Sets (of six each) Lacquered Trays. 

4342 Ten Sets (of three each) do. 

4343 Twenty Sets (of three each) do. 

4344 Thirty Sets (of two each) do. 

4345 Ten Sets (of three each) do. 

4346 Two Sets (of three each) do. 

4347 Ten Red Lacquered Trays. 

4348 Ten Black do. 

4349 Twenty-five Sets (of three each) do. 

4350 Ten Sets (of three each) do. 

4351 Twenty Black Lacquered Trays. 

4352 Three Pieces Porcelain,Teapot, Sugar-basin and Cream-jug, 

ornamented with gold. 

4353 Twelve Porcelain Coffee Cups and Saucers, painted red. 

4354 Twelve do. do. do. 

4355 Twelve do. do. do. 

4356 Two do. Teapots. 

4357 Three do. do. 

4358 Six do. Winecups. 

4359 Three do. do. 

4360 Fifty Earthenware Teacups. 

4361 Twenty Porcelain Basins. Made in Hizen. 

4362 Six do. Coffee Cups and Saucers. 

4363 Twelve do. do. 

4364 Twelve do. do. 

4365 Twelve do. do. 

4366 Twelve do. do. 

4367 Twelve do. do. 

4368 Twelve do. do. 

4369 Twelve do. do. 

4370 Twelve do. do. 

4371 Twelve do. do. 

4372 Twelve do. do. 

4373 Twelve do. do. 

4374 One hundred Sets (of three each) Tea Caddies, of Kiri. 

4375 One hundred Straw work do. 

4376 Fifty Sets (of five each) Straw- work Sweetmeat Pots. 

4377 Fifty Sets (of three each) do. do. 

4378 Straw-work Jewel Cabinet. 

4379 Do. do. 

4380 Do. do. 

4381 Do. do. 

4382 One hundred Toy Tortoises, in glass boxes. 

4383 One hundred * do. do. 

4384 One hundred do. do. 

4385 One hundred Children's Toys. 



304 CATALOGUE OF THE 

4386 One hundred Children's Toys. 

4387 Five hundred do. 

4388 Five hundred do. 

4389 Five hundred do. 

4390 Five hundred do. 

4391 Fifty do. 

4392 Fifty do. 

4393 Thirty do. 

4394 Thirty do. 

4395 Four hundred do. 

4396 Five hundred do. 

4397 Fifty do. 

4398 Ten do. 

4399 Fifty . do. 

4400 Procession (in porcelain) of Daimios. 

4401 Do. do. Daimio*s Wife. 

4402 Do. do. Prince. 

4403 Ornament, Flower-basket on Waggon. 
4403 Ivory Model of River Boat. 

4405 Do. do. in summer time. 

4406 Do. do. 

440? Do. of Street Carriage, for two persons. 

4408 Do. do. for one person. 

4409 Ivory Ornament. 

4410 Dd. 

4411 Do. 

4412 Do. 

4413 Do. 

4414 Do. 

4415 Do. 

4416 Do. 

4417 Do. 

4418 Netsuke, made of bone. 

4419 Do. do. 

4420 Thirty do. 

4421 Two Ornaments, made of bone. 

4422 Thirty Solitaires, ivory, inlaid with stone. 

4423 Twenty Netsuke, made of bone. 

4424 Ten do. do. 

4425 Card Case of Ivory, inlaid with stone. 

4426 Do. carved in ivory. 

4427 Do. do. 

4428 Five hundred Paper Toys for Childreiu 

4429 One thousand do. do. 

4430 Five hundred do. do. 

4431 One hundred do. do. 

4432 Thirty do. do. 



IHTERCOLOXiaL EXHIBITIOX, 1^73- ^^ 

4f^SS Twenty-five Paper Toys for Children. 

4434< One hundred do. da 

4435 Water Colour Picture on silk. 

4436 Thirty dozen Photographs of Japanese Views^ &c. 

4437 Old Lacquer Cabinet^ ornamented with silver. 

4438 Do. Writing Case» richly ornamented with gold; 

with paper box. 

4439 Do. do. do. 

4440 Do. do. do. 

4441 Do. do. do. 

4442 Do. do. do. 

4443 Do. do. do. 

4444 Do. do. do. 

4445 Small Cabinet of Old Lacquer for Writing Paper Ink, &c 

4446 Do. do. do. 

4447 Old Lacquer License Box. 

4448 Do. Writing Case, with Paper Box. 

4449 Gold Lacquer Jewel Cabinet. 

4450 Do. do. painted ornament. 

4451 Do. do. do. 
44o2 Gold Lacquered Letter Box. 

4453 Do. do. 

4454 Do. do. 

4455 Do. do. 

4456 Set (six in each), Pic-nic Cases. 

4457 Do. (two in each) do. 

4458 Do. (four in each) Old Lacquer Incense Boxes. 

4459 Do. do Rich Gold Lacquer Incense Boxes. 

4460 Old Lacquer Incense Box. 

4461 Do. do. 

4462 Do. do. 

4463 Do. do. 

4464 Pair Lacquer Incense Boxes. 

4465 Old Lacquer Incense Box. 

4466 Old Lacquer Sweetmeat Pot, with stand. 

4467 Old Lacquer Incense Box. 

4468 Large Old Lacquer Tray, used for carrying gifts. 

4469 Ten Rich Gold Old Lacquer Round Trays. 

4470 One do. do. Fan-shaped Tray. 

4471 Five do. do. do. Sweetmeat Trays. 

4472 Pair Old Lacquer Jewel Casea 

4473 Piece do. do. 

4474 Do. do. do. 

4475 Do. do. do. 

4476 Pair do. do. 

4477 Do. do. do. Seal Box. 

4478 Set (four pieces each) Old Lacquer Incense Box, 

w 



306 CATALOGUE OF THF. 

4479 Rich Old Lacquer Stand, for Tea Cups. 

4480 Saddle and Stirrups, of old gold lacquer. (The stirrups 

4481 are made of steel and lacquered.) 

4482 Old Lacquer Sword Stand. 

4483 Old Lacquer Cabinet, with writing case. 

4484 Writing Case, with Paper Box. 

4485 Do. do. do. 

4486 Old Lacquer Incense Box, about 500 years old. 

4487 Do. do. do. 400 years old. 

4488 Do. do. do. 300 years old. 

4489 Old Lacquer Medicine Box, carried at the belt. 200 years 

old. 

4490 Do. do. do. 

4491 Do. do. do.. 100 years old. 

4492 Old Lacquer Jewel Cabinet. 

4493 Porcelain Vases, various sizes, &c. 

4494 Do. do. 

4495 Three do. do. 

4496 One do. 

4497 Do. do. 
44198 Do. do. 

4499 Do. do. 

4500 Do. do. 

4501 Do. do. 

4502 Two do. do. 

4503 Do. do. 

4504 Bronze Pagoda. 

4505 Do. Indian Figure on Root of Iree. 

4506 Do. Incense Burner, figure of Peacock. 

4507 Do. ' do. do. 

4508 Do. do. do. Man on Cow. 

4509 Do. do. do. Man on Deer. 

4510 Do. do. do. Peacock. 

4511 Do. do. do. Cock. 

4512 Do. do. Crane. 

4513 Suit of Armour, made of lacquered steel and silk ribbon. 

4514 Sword, ornamented with chased silverwork; the scabbaiM 
of lacquered wood. 



4515 Do. 

4516 Do. 



do. 
_ do. 

4517 Do. sharkskin handle do. 

4518 Do. do. do. 

4519 Do. do. do. 

4520 Do. do. do. ^ 

4521 Portable Inkstand, gold and silver, inlaid on iron, llu^ 

is carried suspended to the belt. 
4523 Bronze Vase, inlaid gold and silver. 



f 



INTERCOLONIAL BXHIBITION, 1875. 307 

4524 Twelve Fishing Bods, telescopic and four yards long. 

4525 Five do. do. do. 

4526 Five do. do. do. 

4527 Two do. do. do. 

4528 Two do. do. with wheel. 

4529 One do. do. in seven pieces. 
Note. — These fishing rods are lengthened by blowing througli 

them as you blow a pea from a peanshooter. 

4530 Forty-eight Gilt Leather Money Pouches, large size. 

4531 Twenty-four do. do. medium size. 

4532 Twenty-four do. do. do. 

4533 Sixty do. do. small size. 

4534 Four hundred Toy Pictures for Children. 

4535 Ten Short Swords. 

4536 Ten do. 

4537 Ten do. 

4538 Ten do. 

4539 Two Large Pouches. 

4540 Two Smoking Pipes. 

4541 Three Sets (of two each) Inlaid Lacquered Trays. 

4542 Cabinet of Bamboo Work. 

4543 Do. do. 

4544 Pair Porcelain Vases. Hizen. 

4545 Do. do. do. 

4546 Do. do. do. 

4547 Do. do. do. 

4548 Do. do. do. 

4549 Do. do. do. 

4550 Do. do. do. 

4551 Do. do. do. 

4552 Do. do. . do. 

4553 Do. do. do. 

4554 Do. do. do. 

4555 Do. do. do. 

4556 Do. do. do. 

4557 Do. do. do. 

4558 Do. do. do. 

4559 Do. do. do. 

4560 Do. do. do. 

4561 Do. do. do. 

4562 Do. do. do. 

4563 Incense Bmner do. 

4564 Forty Richly Painted Perfume Bottles. 

4565 Sixty Cigar-ash Holders. Painted Wan-iors. 

4566 Twenty-one Richly Painted Sweetmeat Pots. 

4567 Twenty-four Richly Ornamented Flower Pots, with stands 

4568 Twenty-five do. do, without stands. 

w 2 



308 



CATALOGUB OF TUB 



4569 

4570 
4571 
4572 
4573 
4574 
4575 
4576 
4577 
4578 
4579 
4580 
4581 
4582 
4583 
4584 
4585 
4586 
4587 
4588 
4589 
4590 
4591 
4592 
4593 
4594 
4595 
4596 



4597 
4598 
4599 
4600 
4601 
4602 
4603 
4604 
4605 
4606 

4607 
4608 
4609 
4610 
4611 
46 J 2 
4613 



Six Porcelain Cigar Boxes, richly painted. Hizen, 

Three hundred Porcelain Incense Boxes. do. 

Four Richly Painted Porcelain Dishes, 2 ft. 2 in. do. 

Six do. do. do. do. 

Thirteen do. Porcelain Wine Cups. do. 

Twenty-five Richly Painted Porcelain Tumblers. do. 
Sixteen do. do. Wine Cups. do. 

Eight dozen do. do. Coffee Cups. do. 

Seventeen do. (with saucers). Porcelain CoflFee Cups. do. 

do. 



Thirty-three 

Thirty-six 

Twelve 

Six 

Six 

Ten 

Five 

Five 

Five 

Ten 

Twenty 

Twenty 

Twenty-five 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



do 
Chocolate Cups do. 

do. 
do. 



do. 
do. 

do. do. 

do. do. 

(saucers and covers) do. 

Basins 

(1 ft. 6 in. wide) 

do. 

do. 

(1 ft. 1 in. wide) 



Dishes 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Tea Cups 
Tea Pots 



do. (saucers of wood) Tea Cups 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Six Richly-Painted Porcelain Basins. Hizen. 

Six do. do. Dishes do. 

Six do. do. do. do. 

Five do. do. do. do. 

Five do. do. do. do. 

Portion of Porcelain Dinner Service, consisting of 8 oval, 2 

round, and 2 vegetable dishes; 1 dozen coffee cups 

and saucers, and 1 dozen egg cups. 
One thousand Mechanical Porcelain Toys. 
Two hundred and eighty do. do. do. 
Pair Porcelain Vases, Flowers and Birds. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do.' 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Human Figures 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Flowers. 



Porcelain Picture, Water Fowls. 

Pair Porcelain Vases, Floweis and Birds. 

Do. do. do. Dragon and Tiger. 

Do. do. do. Deer. 

Do. do. do. Warrior. 

Do. do. do. Birds and Flowers. 

Do. do. do. do. 

Do. do. do. . Tortoise aud Fish. 



Tokei. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 309 

4614 Pair t^orcelain Vases, Birds and Flowers. Tokei. 

4615 Do. do. do. do. do. 

4616 Do. do. do. Landscape. do. 

4617 Do. do. do. Dragon and Tiger. do. 

4618 Do. do. do. Falcon. do. 

4619 Do. do. do. Grapes. do. 

4620 Do. do. do. Eagle. do. 

4621 Do. do. do. Historical Picture. do. 

4622 Do. do. do. Chrysanthemums. do. 

4623 Do. do. do. Cards. do. 

4624 Do. do. do. Fans. do. 

4625 Do. do. do. Human Figures. do. 

4626 Do. do. do. do. do. 

4627 Do. do. do. Geometrical Figure. do. 

4628 Do. do. do. do. 

4629 Do. do. do. Human Figures. do. 

4630 Do. do. do. Fisher. do. 

4631 Do. do. do. Human Figure. do. 

4632 Do. do. do. Landscape. do. 

4633 Do. do. do. Flowers. do. 

4634 Do. do. do. do. do. 

4635 Do. do. do. Flowers and Birds. do. 

4636 Do. do. Tea Jars, four. do. 

4637 Do. do. Vases, historical. do. 

4638 Do. do. Tea Jars, Tea-leaf Gatlierers. do. 

4639 Do. do. do. four do. 

4640 Six Coffee Cups, with Saucers. do. 

4641 Twelve do. do. do. 

4642 Twelve do. do. do. 

4643 Two Trays of Red Lacquer. 

4644 Writing Case Lacquer, ornamented in gold. 

4645 Two Pair Solitaires, ornamented with various metals. 

4646 Seven Scarf Pins, do. do. do. 

4647 Match Box, made of silver. 

4648 Small Sword, ornamented with variors metals. 

4649 Do. do. with gold work. 

4650 Do. do. with gold and silver work. 

" KIRITZUKOSHO COMPANY," Japan, 
Enamelled articles are formed in the following maimer : — ^A founda- 
tion of copper is formed of the shape requu-ed; upon this a network of 
brass wire is formed, according to the design of the ornamentation. The 
interatices of the wire are then filled up with the different enamels imtil 
the surface is quite smooth. The articles are then submitted to a great 
heat, and after they are cool more enamel is put on, and they are again 
put into the furnace. This is repeated four or five times. When this 
operation is finished they are rubbed with rough stones, then with finer 
ones, and so on until the articles are smooth and polished. 



310 CATALOGUE OF THE 



4651 


Pair Okaii Porcelain 'V 


4652 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4653 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4654 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4655 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4656 


Do. 


do. 


' do. 


4657 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4658 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4659 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4660 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4661 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4662 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4663 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4664 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4665 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4666 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4667 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4668 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4669 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4670 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4671 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4672 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4673 


One 


do. 


do. 


'4674 


Pair 


do. 


do. 


4675 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4676 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4677 


Pair Ka^ Porcelain V 


4678 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4679 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4680 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4681 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4682 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4683 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4084 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4085 


Pair 


Okari Porcelain \ 


4686 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4687 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4688 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4689 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4690 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4691 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4692 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4693 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4694 


One 


do. 


do. 


4695 


Pail- 


do. 


do. 


4696 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4697 


One 


do. 


do. 


4698 


Pair 


do. 


do. 


4699 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


4700 


Do. 


do. 


do. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 311 

4701 Twenty Okari Porcelain Basins — ^Flowers. 

4702 Thirty do. do. Flower Pots—Willow Trees. 

4703 Thirty do. do. Basins. 

4704 Seventy-two do. Tea Pots. 

4705 Five pair Okari Porcelain Flower Pots — oblong shape. 

4706 Five sets (of three each) do. do. 

4707 Pair Incense Burners. 

4708 Do. Water Pots. 

4709 Do. do. 

4710 Twenty Okari Porcelain Basins — Lacquered. 

4711 Forty do. do. do. 

4712 Three Hundred Japanese Tea Cups — Okari. 

4713 Thirty Sweetmeat Pots. do. 

4714 Two pairs Water Pots. do. 

4715 Pair do. 

4716 Do. do. 

4717 Porcelain Filter. 

4718 Pair Copper Enamelled Vases. 

4719 Do. do. do. 

4720 Do. do. do. 

4721 Do. do. do. 

4722 Do. do. do. 

4723 Do. do. do. 

4724 Do. do. do. 

4725 Do. do. do. 

4726 Do. do. do. 

4727 Do. do. do. 

4728 Do. do. do. 

4729 Do. do. do. 

4730 Do. do. do. 

4731 Do. do. do. 

4732 Do. do. do. 

4733 Do. do. do. 

4734 Do. do. do. 

4735 Do. do. do. 
4236 Do. do. do. 

4737 Do. do. do. 

4738 Do. do. do. 

4739 Do. do. do. 

4740 Do. do. do. 

4741 Do. do. do. 

4742 Do. do. do. 

4743 Do. do. do. 

4744 Do. do. do. 

4745 Do. do. do. 

4746 Do. do. do. 

4747 Do. do. do. 

4748 Do. do. do. 

4749 Do. do. do. 

4750 Do. do. do. 



■ 



312 CATALOGUE OP THR 

4751 Pair Copper Enamelled Vases. 

4752 Do. do. do. 

4753 Do. do. do. 

4754 Do. do. do. 

4755 Do. do. do. 

4756 One do. do. 

4757 Do. do. do. 

4758 Do. do. do. 

4759 Pair do. do. 

4760 Do. do. do. 

4761 Do. do. do. 

4762 Do. do. do. 

4763 Do. do. do. 

4764 Do. do. do. 

4765 Do. do. do. 

4766 Do. do. do. 

4767 Do. do. do. 

4768 Do. do. do. 

4769 One do. do. 

4770 Do. do. do. 

4771 Charcoal Copper Enamelled Brazier. 

4772 Pair Copper Enamelled Vases. 

4773 Do. do. do. 

4774 Do. do. do. 

4775 Do. do. . do. 

4776 Do. do. do. 

4777 Do. do. do. 

4778 One do. do. 

4779 Pair Copper Enamelled Trays. 

4780 Do. do. do. 

4781 Copper Enamelled Vase. 

4782 Pair Copper Enamelled Trays. 

4783 Do. do. 

4784 Do. do. 

4785 Do. do. 

4786 Do. do. 

4787 Do. do. 

4788 Do. . do. 

4789 Do. do. 

4790 Do. do. 

4791 Do. do. 

4792 Do. do. 

4793 Do. do. 

4794 Do. do. 

4795 Do. do. 

4796 Do. do. 

4797 Do. do. 

4798 Do. do. 

4799 Pair Copper Enamelled Vases. 

4800 Pair Copper Enamelled Trays, oblong, 18 in. 



do. 




do. 


24 in. diameter. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


octagon. 


do. 


14 in. diameter. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


• do. 


do. 


square. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 



INTERCOLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1875. 313 



4802 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


"V ^ — I ' 

do. 


4803 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


4804 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


4805 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


4806 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


4807 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


4808 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


4809 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


4810 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


4811 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


4812 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


4813 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


4814 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


round, 12 in. 


4815 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


square, 12 in. 


4816 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


4817 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


4818 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


4819 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


4820 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


^ do. 



4821 One Copper Enamelled Vase, 3 ft. 7 in. high. 

4822 Do. do. do. do. * 

4823 Pair do. do. 21 in. higL 

4824 Do. do. do. 24 in. high. 

4825 One Copper Enamelled Tray, 24 in. diameter. 

do. do. 

do. Sweetmeat Pot, 18 in. high. 



4826 


Do. 


do. 


4827 


Do. 


do. 


4828 


Do. 


do. 


4829 


Do. 


do. 


4830 


Pair 


do. 


4831 


Do. 


do. 


4832 


Do. 


do. 


4833 


Do. 


do. 


4834 


Do. 


do. 


4835 


Do. 


do. 


4836 


Do. 


do. 


4837 


Do. 


do. 


4838 


Do. 


do. 


4839 


Do. 


do. 


4840 


Do. 


do. 


4841 


Do. 


do- 


4842 


Do. 


do. 


4843 


Do. 


do. 


4844 


Do. 


do. 


4845 


Do. 


do. 


4846 


Do. 


do. 


4847 


Do. 


do. 


4848 


Eleven do. 


4849' 


Twentydo. 


4850 


Pair 


do. 



do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 
do. 


do. 

24 in. 


12 in. high, 
diameter. 


do. 


12 in. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 
do. 


oblong, 
do. 




do. 


do. 




do. 


do. 




do. 
do 


square, 
do. 




do. 


do. 




do. 


do. 




do. 


do. 




do. 


do. 




do. 


do. 




do. 


do. 




do. 


do. 




do. 


do. 




do. 


Sweetmeat Pots. 



316 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Iilthograi»h«m. 

Page 

Hamel and Ferguson ... 9 
Whitehead (£.) and Co. ... 47 

Merohants and Warahonae- 

mmtf% 

Macfarlane Bros, and Co- ... 81 
Webster, Corrie and Co. ... 79 

Mnaical Inatramanta. 

Fincham, George 70 

Furlong (W. R.) and Co. ... 6z 

Kilner, J. ... ... ... 70 

Mater and Co. (A. C. Hue- 

nerbein) 39 

Mathews, William 56 

Nicholson and Ascherberg, 

and page of Cover. 
Osbom, Cushing and Co. ... 53 

Steinfeld, E a8 

Weatherill, Thomas 74 

Ovena, Stovaa, ata 

Jeans (S.) and Co 55 

i'arker and Co 79 

Walker, A. R. 34 

Wallis (F.) and Sons ... 35 

Photosrajthara. 

Baily, H. H. 79 

Batdielder and Co. 77 

ClifTord, S. ... ... ... 80 

Johnstone, O'Shannessy and 
Co back of cover. 

PrinUnff Matariala and bika. 

Cooke Brothers 58 

Freemantle and Co 77 

Gordon and Gotch 51 

Wimble, F.J 38 

Saddlery and Hamaoa. 

Adams, J. ... .... ... 63 

Altson, D ix 

Seedamen. 

Creswell, C F. 
Grant and Cameron ... 
Law, Somner and Co. 

Sewlnff Maohlnea. 
Mack and Ellis 
M'Lean Bros, and Rigg 

Stattonara. 

Detmold, William ... 
Gordon and Gotch ... 



33 
77 
33 



... 30 
... 35 



47 
51 



... 59 
... 68 



Page 

Jackson, Robert 81 

Sands and M'Dougall ... x 
Walch (J.) and Sons ... 80 

Whitehead (E.) and Co. ... 47 

Tatlora. 

Camaby, George 69 

Peapes and Shaw 73 

Tobacoo, Bnuff, and Cigara. 
Dudgeon and Amell ... 71 
Moss, White and Co. ... 63 
Partridge, C J 73 

Veterinary Madiolnaa. 
Davy and Rocke 

Lay, John 

Noms,T.W. 3rd page of Cover 

Watchmakera. 

Gaunt, Thomas 45 

Kilpatrick and Co b 

Webster, J. R. 71 

Wlnea, Spirlta, A Provialona. 

Bear and Ford 63 

Smith, Ferguson and Co. ... 46 

Wool Broken. 
Goldsbrough (R.) and Co. 15 
Macfarlane Bros, and Co. ... 8z 
Renard Bros, and Co ... 55 

Webster, Corrie and Co. ... 79 

MISOBI.LANBOU8. 

Alcock & Co. (billiard table) 38 
Australian Manufacturing 

Company ... 73 

Bannister, Milligan and Co., 

advertising agents ...66 

Barton, WiUiam, John Bull 

Hotel ... ... ... 5s 

Berry, C. A., assayer, &c ... 49 
China Hall, (J. Dynon) ... 49 
Cit^ of Melbourne Gas and 

Coke Company 76 

Clark, W. T., Rubber Stamp 53 
Collingwood, Fitzroy, ^nd 

District Gas and Coke Co. 14 
Colvin, Charles, shipchandler 79 
Decourtet, Madame, stay 

maker 7s 

Dillon and Burrows, cdnfec> 

tioners ... ... ... 73 

Douglas and Cameron (man- 
telpieces, tiles) 60 

Dunckley and M'Bride, gut 

manufacturers 5s 

Evans, Thomas (tents and 

tarpaulins) 6z 



Page 
Evett, ^Uiam, gold and 
silver beater ... ... 70 

Francis, Birley and Cx)., auc- 
tioneers ... ... ... 67 

Fry, J. S., and Sons (cocoa 
and chocolate) ... ... 64 

Gaunt, Thomas, jeweller aud 

optician 45 

Gilbrook Pottery 69 

Graham, J., hairdresser, &c. 65 
Harker, John (bolts & nuts) 63 
Hennessy, Mr., architect ... 67 
Houghton (W. G.) and Co. 
(perambulators) 67 

fennines, J., spectacles ... 69 
ones, J., surgical instruments 59 
«ighton (James) and Co. 
(trunks and portmanteaus) 71 
Lewis and Whilty, blackin^^. 



etc., manufacturers 



68 



Lloyd and Son (window 

blinds shutters, etc.) ... 6x 
M'Carron, Bird and &>., 

printers ...• iv 

M'Oiw, Adamson and Co., 
grain and produce mer- 
chants ... ... ... 50 

Markby and Azzopardi, 
electrotypists, etc. ... 78 

Martin, C. R. (embroidery) 56 
Melbourne Glass Bottle 

Works ... vii 

Montgomery, R. (corks) ... 67 
Murphy, E. (ventilators) ... 76 
Perry, John, timber mer^ 
chant ... ... ... 62 

Pullinger, F.,belUiangerand 

locksmith 60 

Renard Brothers and Co. 

(Yale locks) -.55 

Roeszler, C. G., die sinker... 62 
Rosier, James W., ^nmaker 46 
Rowlands and Lewis, cordial 

manufacturers 68 

Simmonds, J., sculptor ... 69 
Stewart, Robert, jam manu- 
facturer * ... 66 

Stoneman, A., spring manu- 
facturer 67 

Temperance News 74 

Turner, William, tanner ... 80 
Ullathome and Co. (shoe 

mercery, &c.) 63 

Victoria Vami^ Company 66 
Warburton, Thos. (spouting) 60 
Walson and Paterson, ham 
and baccn curers 70 



* The Address is 33 Flindbks Lane Wbst (not X58 Queen Street, as printed). 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTl^SER. 



VICTORIAN PERMANENT 

Igroptrtg Inhestmtnt anb ^uitotiig ^odttjj. 



Instituted cmd Registered Autjtufl^ tSb'J,. 



The Largest, Meet SucceBifiilr uid Most EqnitaUe Boilding Society ta thd 

Anstniiaa Ook>nie& 

THE LOANS ON FREEHOLDS EXCEED £800,000. 



Entrance Fee, Is. per Share. Fortnhjhthj Suh<t'riptkm^ Is, per Investing Sharv. 

SUBSCRIBED CAPITAL, £1,500,000. PAID UP, £325,000. 

SPKGIAL ADVANTAGES TO BORROWKRS, 

1. Borrowing Members may enter the Society aiwl obtain an Acivanoe without 
making any previous payment beyond the Entrance anil Survey Feetik. 

2. No Premium chiu^ed on Loans. 

3. The Repayments may spread over any number of years, fi'ora One to Twelve, 

4. AU Future Payments may be redeemed at any time on e4)\iitable terms. 

5. When the Loan is for the erection of New BuildiugN, the repayments do not be^du 
iintil the whole of the money is advanced. 



THE FOLLOWINP REPAYMENTS INCLUDE PRINCIPAL AND INTEHE8T FOR A 




LOAN 


r OF £100: - 






No. of Years for which 


Fortnightly 


Total Amount 


T(JtaI Amount 


Interest for 


Loan is effected. 


Repayments* 


per Annum. 


HeiHild, 
£105 6 


whole term. 


One 


£4 1 


£105 6 


£5 6 


Two ... 




2 2 8 


55 9 4 


110 IM 8 


10 18 H 


Three ... 




19 8 


38 11 4 


115 14 


16 14 


Four ... 




13 4 


80 ^ 8 


121 H 


21 6 8 


Five ... 




19 8 


25 11 4 


127 16 8 


27 16 8 


Six ... 




17 


22 2 


132 12 


82 12 


Seven ... 




15 4 


19 18 8 


130 10 8 


3U 10 H 


Eight ... 




14 


18 4 


145 12 


45 19 


Nine ... 




13 


16 18 


152 2 


52 2 


Ten 




12 4 


16 8 


160 6 8 


60 6 8 


Eleven... 




11 8 


15 3 4 


166 16 8 


m 16 8 


Twelve 




Oil 


14 6 


171 12 


71 1*2 



The Repayments may be made Monthly, Quarterly, Half- Yearly, or Yearly, 

TO DEPOSITORS, 

Sums of Money received on Pixed Depositit on the following terms : lle^)ayabLe 3 
onths from date of depont^ 4 per oeat.; 6 ditto, 5 i)er cent. ; 12 ditt<i, 6 pei' u^nt. pe^- 



months 
annum. 



The Office i> opea dailj for receiving and paying De|>osltH, AU Cli»qum and Poi»t 
office Orders are payable to Jamk MutfBO, BeKa-etary, 

rm s p et tu ses. Bale s, Ammsi Reports, aad every information can \)e oUaiued at tJi« 

socrfrirs offices, 

46 COLLINS STREET EAST, MELBOURNE, 

JAMES MUNRO, SacRJOTARy. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



THE 



NATIONAL BANK OF AU8TRAU8IA, 

(JncorportUed by Acts qf Victorian, South Austraiian, and Western Awtralian ParliamewUJ 

Capital, £1,000,000 in 200,000 Shares of £5 Each. 
PAID-UP, £750,000. RESERVE Fund, £250,000. 

HEAD OFFICE - - - MELBOURNE. 



Directors : 



R. MURRAY SMITH, Esq., M.L.A., Chairman. 
THOMAS SMITH, Esq. 

Chief Manager: F. O. SMITH. Esq. 



ANDREW SUTHERLAND, Esq. 
Hon. WM. WILSON, M.L.C. 
Inspector of Branches : J. SALMON, Esq. 



Accountant: F. E. STEWART, Esq. Auditors: W, H. TUCKETT, Esq.; A. BURNS, Esq. 
SoUcitors: Messrs. MALLESON, , ENGLAND, and STEWART. 



Elizabeth-street, 

Melbourne. 
Bacchus Marsh. 
Baimsdale. 
Ballarat. 
Blackwood. 
Buninyong. 
Casterton. 
dunes. 
Colac. 



BRANCHES AND AGENCIES IN VICTORIA 



Coleraine. 

CoUingwood. 

Dookie South. 

Emerald Hill. 

Euroa. 

Footscray. 

Geelong. 

Hamilton. 

Horsham. 

Koroit. 

BRANCHES IN 



Kyneton. 

Learmonth. 

Longerenong. 

Macarthur. 

Mafi&a. 

Northcote. 

Penshurst. 

Prahran. 

Richmond. 

Romsey. 

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 



Sale. 

Sandhurst. 

Sandridffe. 

Scarsdale. 

Stratford. 

Taradale. 

Violet Town. 

Warmambool. 



Hon. WILLIAM 
HON. HY. KENT 

Aberdeen. 

Ansaston. 

Auburn. 

Clare. 

Edithburgh. 

Gawler. 

George Town. 

Hin&iarsh. 

James Town. 



Local Directors: 
EVEBARD, M.L.C. I HON. A. BLYTH, M.P. 

HUGHES, M.P. I HENRY SCOTT, BSQ. 

Adelaide— R. G. WILKINSON, Esq., Manager. 



Kadina. 

Kapunda. 

Kooringa. 

Laura. 

Mallala. 

Moonta. 

Mount Barker. 

Mount Gambler. 

Narracoorte. 



North Adelaide. 

Norwood. 

Nuriootpa. 

Penola. 

Port Adelaide. 

Port Augusta. 

Port Macdonnell. 

Port Pirie. 

Port Wakefield. 



Red Hill. 

Riverton. 

Saddleworth. 

Strathalbyn. 

Truro. 

Wallaroo. 

Weaner's Flat. 

Willunga. 

Yorke Town. 



WESTERN AUSTRALIA— Perth, Fremantle, Albany. 

LONDON Office: 149 Leadenhall Street, E.C. 

Directors : 

J. W. MUTTLEBURY. Esq. 1 THOMAS GRAVES, ESQ. ( ABRAHAM SCOTT, Esq. 

Manager : T. M. HARRINGTON, ESQ. Solicitors : MBSSR8. MARKBY, TARRY, & STEWAHT. 

Bankers : The Bank of England and the London Joint Stock Bank. 



TASMANIA ... ... ... 

NEW SOUTH WALKS AND 
QUEENSLAND 

NEW ZEALAND 

VICTORIA 

GREAT BRITAIN 

INDIA AND CHINA 

VALPARAISO 

SAN FRANGISOO 

RIO JANEIRO 

CAPE OP GOOD HOPE ... 



.A-O-EIiTTS. 
The Commercial Bank of Van Diemen's Land. 
The Commercial Banking Company of Sydney ; The Australian Joint 

Stock Bank ; Queensland National Bai^, Limited ; City Bank. 
The Bank of New Zealand. 
Portland, Belfast : Bank of Australasia. 
Scotland: The National Bank of Scotland. Ireland: The ProTindal Baok 

of Ireland ; The National Bank; The Ulster Banking Oompany. 
The Chartratid Mercantile Bank of India, London, and China; Agra 

Bank, Limited; Chartered Bank of India, Australia, and China. 
F. Huth, GrUning & Co. 
Hellmann Ilrotho* A Co. 
English Bank of Rio Janeiro. 
The London and South African Bank. Port Elizaheth, GrahamV 

Town, Cape Town. NATAL: D'Urbaa. 



r%^^'.^%^cns: jirv\aart?s«x .^ 



lanb mKism Hank of l^imm. 



lustrmrtmi wm^r •^S%i '4 ^mi » ^aCuKv S^«^ 



HEAD OFFICE: OOLLIXS STREET SJkST^ 

Capital, dSSOOjOOO, in 50,000 Shares of £10 «Mshs 

Hie HoK. &m Fbjlscs MrKnrr. 11.UC I'lminMMi^ 
The HosL C. J. Jeexol. 1LL.C Vki^ClMacMMk 
Hie Hox. B. Btesil. J.P., ^raK^nMii-^tK^t. 
WnxLAJi IhErxoLD, £b^. C4:4]ni»^te«K. 



LONDON OFFICE: 17 KINlVS ARMS YAKMV 

LOXDOX BOAKD OF MANOKMKNT* 

Lord Alfbsd Spencer Churchill, 1^ RuUtuit) iUl<\ 

Alexander M' Arthur, Esq. (Messrs. W. luu) A« M'ArUm)\> 

James Rae, Esq. {Director of tkeSHfifijitky Sc^tistk^ «^ AHsh\ih%^n OA««)>hl>\^ l^t»4<> t 

Adolfhus Willlam Young, Esq., M.P. 

Manager - - RoRERT MoRiUN Voi^NQ, K«)« 



OBJECTS.— The objects of the Company are ~ 

1. To make advances in the Colony of Victoria on MvcAtt^f KiiiAW tin/^ 

2. To receive money on Debenture or on Dvptwit forthv imrptmo tvf h\\\A\ HitvtiUiHMi. 

3. To act as Agent for Investing Capital. Nt>^)tiatiutr LtmnM, (S)llm>(inu IUi\(n. 

Debts, &c.; Managing the Estates ox AbHttntm^M, 1^'\iiiiPt>M, mw] uihiMfii HUM 
generally conducting a Trust and AuKNCY DtiMtuMM, 

INTEREST.—The following is the Rate of Iuter«Ht allttwttil on I)d|iiwUmi > |#. , 

12 Montlis and upwards ... 6 per oont. par Annum. 
6 Montlis do. ... 6 do. do. 

3 Months do. ... 4 do. do. 

Special arrangements may be made for lart(u nwiun for lotiijtft' lUtuN, 

SECURITY.— The Deed of Incorporation pvoyfU\tm tlmt liU tlia fumln ttf Uttf hiiii)* 
whether derived from j5/mwm, i)e6en<//rivr. or y>r/;W/« imiai !»«» I»hi(. mm /'Vii^Am/i/ 
Property onlj; and the Investors are fiirthM)' WM*\\Ytki\ hy i\\u \\\\\mi\\\m\ imm) 
Paid-up Capital, which must alwayN \m in aximntk itt Uim wMMMnit UwuMM IiImim 
affordjbg the most imdoubted security. 

LOANS.— Advances are made on Fr^etioU VrttymiVt Mi tmnt^wi ni(/U«, f/»f /i^ml 
periods, or subject to repayment Xiy instAlmtMiU, mm mi^)/ \ti* M^»<^u<i- 

Arrangements may also be made for ob(aiftir»|f < Wi < 'rtfiiUt, ou iU»* lm«^M nf H^mtyn^ufi 
Freehold Security, whereby isieniMt U ehirtimi only im iU** tiim httu*i, 

Further informatioii may be bad on MnAhmiU*m i/p 
CiMiMM-itred EaM^ MeSbomrtu, WO. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



THE 



Ittfitkn €i|arteeJ)f ^mk 0f l^ustralia. 



Incorpoi'ated by Royal Charter ^ 1852, 



Paid-up Capital - One Million Sterling. 
Reserve J5md_j^_iB120,0 00. 

LONDON OFFICE— 88 CANNON STREET, CITY, E.G. 



Charles George Bamett, Esq. 
Richard Henry Browii, Esq. 
Tlioinas Chapman, Esq. 



Court of Directors 

William Fane De Salis, Esq. 
Daniel Thomas Evans, Esq. 
John Ralph Engledue, Fsq. 



Charles Falconer, Esq. 
R. B. Wade, Esq. 



&cr#tory— William Martin Young'. | A xsisfant Secretary — Charles Guthrie. 

Auditors — J. Q. Henriques, Eaq.', J. V. Foster Fit^erald, Esq. 

Bankers — ^The Bank of England; Messrs. Bametts, Hoares, Hanburj^s & Lloyd. 



Inspector and General Manager— ^hvin Brett. [ Assistant Branch Inspector— E. D. Puekle. 

VICTORIA: 

Melbourne Branch: 
Local Directors -The Hon. Sir James M'Culloch, M.Ij.A.; The Hon. James Henty, M.L.C. 

Manager- John R. Ross. 

Melbourne Sub-Branch— 185 Bourke Street East: Sub- Manager -DoraXd^ MacLeod. 



Ararat— Manager, J. B. Littlejolm. 
Ballarat West— Manager, G. A. Chalmers. 

East — Sub-Manager, B. J. Nicholls. 
Carlton — Manager, S. M. Fuckle. 
Clunks — Manager, Jas. Mackenzie. 
DuNOLLY— Manager, W. 8. Puckle. 
Gkklo'O- Manager, John Galletly. 
GoRDOXS— Manager, David Myers. 



Landsborouoii— Manager, T. Anketell. 
Majorca— Manager, P. H. Callan. 
M ARYBORoroii— Manager, John Sutherland. 
Saxdiurst— Manager, W. B. Reid. 
Stai»T!LL— Manager, J. S. Trew. 
Talbot— Manager, James Fowler. 
Wasoaratta— Manager, W. Reid. 



NEW SOUTH WALES: 

Sydney Branch: Local Director— The Hon. Henry Moore, M.L.C. Manager- Malcolm C. Macardr. 

Newcastle Branch: Manager— E. J. Webb. 



-A. C3- E :N- T S. 



England .. The National Provincial Bank of England and its Brandies. 

and the Commercial Bank, Liverpool. 

Scotland . . The National Bank of Scotland and its Branches. 

Ireland The National Bank and its Branches. 

Adelaide The Bank of South Australia. 

Bombay, Madras, and Calcutta . . The Chartered Bank of India, Au8tralia,aQd China. 

Boston, U.S Messrs. Kidder, Peabody, and Co. 

Canada Bank of British North America. 

Cape of Good Hope and Natal . . London and South African Bank, 

Colombo Chartered Mercantile Bank of India, London, and China ; and 

Messrs. A. and R. Crowe and Co. 

HONO Koxo, Shakouai, and Java. . The Chartered Bank of India, Australia, and China. 

Manila Messrs. Russell and Sturgis. 

MAURrriVB The Mauritius Commercial Bonk. 

New York and San Francisco . . Bank of British North America. 

New Zealand Bank of New Zealand. 

Point db Galle The Oriental Bank Corporation. 

Sinoapork The Chartered Bank of India, Australia, and China ; and 

Messrs. Madaine, Fraser and Ca 

Psrtii (Western Australia) . . . . The Western Australian Bank. 

Valparaiso Messrs. Huth, Grttning and Co. 

Yokohama The Oriental Bank Corporation. 

Madras . : « Chartered Mercantile Bank of India, London, aad China. 

SANpwxGii IsLANDB Messfs. Bishop and Ca, HoDolulu. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



5 



TIE BANK or VICTORIA. 

(INCOEPOBATED BY ACT OF COUNCIL.) 

CAPITAL, £1,000,000, in 20,000 Shares of £50 Each. 

RESERVE FUND, £220,000. 

EST.A.BLISIIEI5 OCTOBER, leeS. 



DIRECTORS. 



The Hon. HENBY MILLBB, Esq., Chairman, 
WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Esq. 
J. K. FBEYEB, Esq., J.P. 



H. N. HULL, Esq. 

GENERAL MANAGER. 

JOHN MATHESON, Esq. 



JAMES BLAIB, Esq., J JP., Deputy auiirmau. 
WILLIAM LANE, Esq. 
GEBMAIN NICHOLbON, Esq., J.P. 

AUDITORS. 

I E. P. B. 6TUET, Esq., P.M. 

I SOLICITORS. 

I Messrs. VAUGHAN, MOULB, and SBDDON . 



HEA-D OFFICE. MELB.OUKNE. 



JOHN MATHESON, General Manager. 
E. Gr. HARRISON, Inspector of Branches and 
Secretary. 



RICHARD SHANN, AssUtant Manager and Ac- 
countant. 
A. K. SR^VPABIiy AssUtant Inspecixn' of Branches. 



LONDON OFFICE. 

Local Directors— Edmund Westby, Esq. ; Robert 
Sutherland, Esq. H. L. Taylor, Manager 

Belfast— Murdoch McLeod, Manager 
Sandhurst, with Agencies at Epsom, Eaglehawk 

and Huntly — W. Meudell, Manager 
Gastlemaine, with Agency at Guildford— Thos. 

Young, Manager 
Ballarat, with Agency at Sebastopol — Wm. Robert- 
son, Manager 
Avoca— R H. Lambert, Manager 
Maryborough, with Agencies at Chinaman's Flat 

and Carisbroolc— John Dunn, Manager 
Beaufort — W. A. Jennings, Manager 
Warmambool— L. Ogilby, Manager 
Port Albert— W. H. Parr, Manager 
Beechworth, with Agency at Eldorado— J. D. 

Law, Manager 
Portland-^. L. Archer, Manager 
Hamilton, with Agency at Penshurst— James 

Manson, Manager 
Sale— A. Battersby, Manager 
Maldon-^. R. Griffith, Manager 
Echuca— A. B. Boyd, Manager 
Daylesford-^ohn Jamieson, Manager 
Woodspoint— W. B. Lucas, Acting Manager 
Rushworth— T. W. R. Benbow, Manager 
Mortlake— H. G. Soilleux, Manager 
Heathcote— A. G. W. Scott, Manager 
Stawell— Wm. Fairclough, Manager 
Yackandandah— ^. S. Campbell, Manager 
Kilmore— J. McD. Lamach, Manager 
Wahgunyah, with Agency at Rutherglen— J. F. 

Danieu, Manager 



New South Walks . 

QCBBXBLASn) .. 

South Australia 

WBSTBRN AuSTRALLk . 

Tasmania 
India and China 
Nbw Zealand. . 



GEELONG BRANCH. 

Local Director— Andrew B. White, Esq.* William 
Young, Manager 

Walhalla— J. H. Langhome, Manager 

Inglewood— J. D. Mills, Manager 

Dunolly — E. Gilliland, Manager 

Murchison — C. J. Reid, Actmg Manager 

St. Amaud — A. R. Mackenzie^ Manager 

Casterton — A. L. Archer, Actmg Manager 

Horsham — J. Mclnnes, Manager 

Kjaieton— Robt. Hyndman, Manager 

Seymour— F. Merson, Manager 

Coleraine — H. Chambers, Manager 

Merino- J. A. Adamson, Acting Manager 

Wodonga — J. Wigmore, Manager 

Harrow -M. McOonechy, Managfer 

Corop — R. Gates, Acting Manager 

Queensclifif— G. B. H. Cathcart 

Ararat — W. Blackburn, Manager 

Foster- -F. H. Wallen, Manager 

Footscray -J. G. Thomson, Manager 

Prahran — G. Clipperton, Manager 

Fitzroy — R. Gladstones, Muiager 

Emerald Hill — J. Cahill, Blanager 

Baimsdale — R. C. Smallman, Acting Manager 

Avenel — G. P. Taylor, pro S^mager 

Colac— H. A. White, Acting Manager 

Fryerstown — J. Chester, Manager 

Graytown — A. W. Pollock, Acting Manager 

Malmsburj'- T. S. Etheridge, Acting Manager 

Camperdo>«ii — C. W. Woodward, Acting Manager 

Hotham — C. Thorpe, Mana^r 

Oxley— H. W. Francis, Actmg Manager. 



of 
of 



The Australian Joint Stock Bank and Commercial Banking Company 

Sydney. 
The Australian Joint Stock Bank and Commercial Banking Company 

Sydney. 
The Bank of South Australia. 
Tlie Western Australian Bank. ■ 

The Commercial Bank of Van Diemen*s Land and Bank of Tasmania. 
Chartered Mercantile Bank of India, London, and China. 
The Bank of New Zealand. 



f{ 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



ck 



7 BANK BUILDINGS, LOTHBURY, LONDON. 



ESTABLISUET) IN 1837. LIABILITY OP SHAREHOLDERS UNLIMITED. 



Paid-up Capital 
Reserve Funds 



BANKERS. 



£1,280,000 
£400,000 



THE BANK OF ENGLAND AND MESSRS. GLYNN, MILLS, GURRIE AND GO. 

AGENTS. 



The National Provincial Bank of England. 

Tlie London and County Bank. 

BiKMiNOiiAM— Lloyd's Banking Company; The 

Town and Dietrict Bank; The Butningham 

Banking ComiNtny.* 
LivKRPOOL.— The Bank of Liverpool; Tlie Lan- 
caster Banking Company. 
Bristol— Messrs. Cave, BaiUie & Co.; Messrs. 

Miles & Co. 
Lbsds, &c.— Parr's Banking Company; Messrs. 

Beckett & Co.; Messrs. William Williams, 

Brown & Co. 
Portsmouth— Messrs. Grant, Oilman and Long, 

Bankers. 
Plymouth — ^The Devon and Cornwall Banking 

Comi>any. 
Penzanck — Messrs. Bolitho, Sons & Co. 
Southampton— Messrs. Ma4di8on, Atherley & Co. 
York— Messrs. Swann, Clough & Co. 
The Bank of Ireland. 
The Royal Bank of Ireland (Dublin). 
The Northern Banking Company. 
The National Bank of Scotland. 



The Commercial Bank of Scotland. 

The Union Bank of Scotland. 

The City of Qlasgow Bank. 

The Clydesdale Bank. 

The Aberdeen Toi»ti and Comitry Bank. 

The Halifax and Huddersfield Union Bank. 

The Bradford Commercial Bank. 

Messrs. Oarfit, Claypon & Co. (Boston, &c.) 

Messrs. Moore & Robinson's Nottingham Bankin^r 

Company. 
The Northamptonshire Union Bank. 
Messrs. Basset, Son & Harris (Leighton Bozcard, 

&c.) 
Messrs. Foster & Ck>. (Cambridge, &c.) 
Messrs Round. Qreen & Co. (Colchester). 
The West of England and South Wales District 

Bank. 
The Gloucestershire Banking Cominny. 
The County of Gloucester Bank. 
Messrs. Tweedie^ Williams & Co. (Truro, &c.> 
Messrs. J. M. Williams & Co. (Redruth, &c.) 
Messrs. Dingley & Co. (Launceston, &c.) 
Messrs. Vivian, Grylls, Kendall & Co. (Helston). 

India & China, &C. — The Chartered Mercantile Bank of India, London and China; Hong Kong and 
Shanghai Banking Company ; The Chartered Bank of India, Anstralio, and China. 

Batayia— The Chartered Bank of India, Anstralia, and China ; Bank of Rotterdam. 

Brazils— The New London and Brazilian Bank ; The London and River Plate Bank. 

New York. Quebec, Montreal, Halifax- -The Bank of B.N. America. 

Manila — Messrs. Russell and Stnrgij^s. 

SAN Francihco— Messrs. Hellman Brothers k Co.; The London and San Frnucisco Bank (Limited); 
The Bank of B.N. America. 

Valparaiso — iVfessrs. HuCh, Grlining & Co. 

Cape op Good Hope— Standard Bank of British South Africa. 

Mauritius— The Mauritius Commercial Bank. 



ESTABLISHMENTS IN COLONIES. 

Jfnsptttor vitib (Central P^anuger: 
J. F. Mcmullen, Esq., Melbourne. 

BR'ANGHES. 

New South WAIiES— Sydney. 

Queensland— Brisbane, Rockhampton. 

Victoria— Melbourne, Geeloiifr, Portland, Ballaarat, Sandhurst, Smythesdalc, StaweU, Gluncs, Tar- 

nagulla, Dnylesford, Alexandra, Rochciiter, Maryborough. 
South Auhtralia— Adelaide, Port Adelaide. 
TASMANIA— Hobart Town, Launceston. 
New Zealand— Auckland, Grahamstown, Napier, Gisbome, Wellington, Nelson, Hokitika, Qtoy- 

mouth, Charleston, Ross, Walmca, Christchurcli, Lyttelton, Timam, Rangiora, Southbrid^, 

Ashbnrton, Dunedin, luvercargUl, Ganmru. 

J. CURTAYNE, Manager, 

ifl:EiL.BOXJi?:NrE. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



%\t (£jmmxml % mk d ^mix^u 



LIMITED. . 

Intorporated under the "Comf antes Statute, 1864." 



CAPITAL 



- £1,000,000. 



ginttors. 



The Hon. JAMES SERVICE, M.L.A., Chairman. 
GEO. S. COPPIN, Esq., M.L.A. I THOS. MOUBRAY, Esq., J. P. 

JAMES MASON, Esq., J. P. | The Hon. C. J. JENNER, M.L.C. 



Head Office : 30 COLLINS STREET WEST, MELBOURNE. 

(7eftaral Afanagei^HENRY GYLES TURNER. Assisiaul Manager— WILLIAM TURNER. 
Accouniani— ARTHUR NICHOLS. Inspector of Braftches—KL1^R£.T> PRIESTLEY. 



^^BvLUftU •■■ ••• ••• ••• •■• ••• 

^^9C9iAXCfc& MlV ••• «•• ••• ••• •■• ••• 

Suin Sulii ••. 

Bnmswick (with Agency at Coburg) 

Cftrlton (wtth Agencies at Haymarket^ North* 
cote^ and Whittlesea) 

ColHnfi^ood 

CrOBWlCk (with Agency at Kingston) 



W. H. Mortimer, 
Wm. Hamilton, 
Wm. Fulton, 
J. Bartholomew, 
T. C. Russell, 



Manager. 



... E. Towle, 

... W. A. Gilbert, 

Dandenonlt (wUh Agencies at Benvick and II. M. Sutherland, 

Cranboume) 
£c]lllCft ••• ••• ••• ••• ••• ••• Thomas Ellison, 

Gteelong Christopher Caldwell, 

H6id6lb6Tg^ (with Agencies at Eltham and Thomas Leach, 

Diamond Creek) 
Lancefield (with Agency at Romsey) . . . 
HoorOOpna (with kgency at Shepparton) 

MuTchisoii 

Kagambie (with Agency at Avenel) . 

Ssndhnrst ••• 

3 V* xuucia ••* ■*■ ••* 
Wangaratta 

Woodond (with Agency at Gisborne) . 



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II 



11 



II 



liOndoii ••• 
New South Wales and ) 
ftueensland j 

South Australia 

Western Australia 

Tasmania 

Hew Zealand 



... Z. W. Carlisle,- 

. . Thomas Stewart, 

... R.St. J. Mitchell, 

... James Swift, 

... A. Williamson, 

... J. D. St. Pinnock, 

... A. J. Smith, 

... R. L. Dugan, 

.A-O-EITOIBS. 
... The City Bank. 

. . . The Commercial Banking Company of Sydney 

... The Bank of South Australia. 
... The Western Australian Bank. 
. . . The Commercial Bank of Van Diemen*s Land. 
The Bank of New Zealand. 



8 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 





CHARTERED BANK, 

INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER. 1852. 

Paid-up Capital • - . £600,000, 

Witli power to inorease to £1,000,000. 



Court 
Alex. L. Eldbr, Esq. 
Sib GEOfiGE Obey, K.C.B. 
Fbedk. a. Hankey, Esq. 
Stephen P. Kennabd, Esq. 

Colonial Inspector 



OF 



Directors. 

James Bab, Esq. 
John B. Thomson, Esq. 
James D. Thomson, Esq. 
Thomas W. Watson, Esq. 

AND General Manager. 
Hon. Sir G. F. Vebdon, K.C.M.G., C.B., F.B.S. 

Director In Melbourne. 

The Hod. James Gbaham, M.L.C. 

Manager — Geo. Eobt. Tyssen, Esq. | Accountant— Qeo. Walker, Esq. 

BRANCHES. 

Jfh Victoria — Melbourne, Williamstown, Collingwood, Hawthorn, North Melbourne. 

Hay Market (North Elizabeth Street), Bichmond, Emerald Hill, Ke«v, 

Brighton, St. Kilda, West Melbourne (King Street). Agencies at 

Brunswick, Coburg, and Essendon. 

In New South Wales — Sydney, Wollongong, Eiama, Moss Vale, and Broughton Creek. 

In South Augtralia — ^Adelaide, Eapunda, Clare, Mount Gambler, Palmerston, and 

Port Darwin. 

AGENTS. 

jEz/^/rtwrf— National Provincial Bank of England. 



/relattd— The Bank of Ireland, and the Ulster 

Banking Company. 
Scotiafui—Tht British Linen Company, National 

Bank of Scotland, and North of Scotlancl 

Bank. 
Manchester — Heywood Bros, and Co. 
Plymouthr—'Rsitrx&y Bulteel and Co. 
Southampton — The Hampshire Banking Co. 
Liverpool — A. Hey wood, Sons and Co. 
Nevo-Castle-on-Tyne — Lambton and Co. 
Birmingham — Lloyd's Banking Company. 
Chester— 'VfiV&ams and Co. 

FOREIGN 

The English Bank of Rio de Janeiro. 
The Mauritius Commercial Bank. 
Bank of British Columbia, San Francisco. 
Messrs. Hainsworth and Co., Valparaiso. 



Bristol^ Newport^ and Cardiff— liht. West of 

England and South Wales District 

Bank. 
Tntro and Camborne^ C<»r«tMfli//— Willyams and 

Co., Miners' Bank. 
Z-wfearrf— Robins, Foster and Co., East Cornwall 

Bank. 
Tasmania — Bank of Van Diemen's Land, and 

the Bank of Tasmania. 
Cape of Good Hope— Thomsoxif Watson and Co. 
Ne^v Zealand— liAtional Bank of New Zealand. 

Limited. 

AGENTS. 

Messrs. Moses and Son, G. Melchior, Copen- 
hagen. 

The Chartered Mercantile Bank of India, Londuu 
and China. 



Solicitors— YAVGHA^, MOULE AND SEDDON. 

Drafts on the London Office, Branches, and Agents of the Banks issued at 
Current rates of Exchange. 

Approved Bills on England, France, or the Australian Colonies, purchased or 
remitted for Collection. 

Local Bills discounted, and Advances made on approved security. 

Interest allowed on Fixed Deposits at the most favourable rates. 

6E0SOE BOBEBT TTSSEN, Uanager, Metbonrne. 

ENGLISH, SCOTTISH, AND AUSTRALIAN CHARTERED BANK, 

EUsabetli and Little FUxidon Btreets, Mellxmnie. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



9 



THE 



m a ■ aJ 



ESTABLISHED 1834. 
Ificorporated by Act of Cotincily 184S. 



Directors. 
Richard Jones, Esq., Chairman. | Walter Lamb, Esq., Deputy Chairman. 

Edward Knox, Esq. I John Brewster, Esq. | F. H. Dangar, E^q. 

Auditors. 

Charles Smith, Esq. | J. R. Street, Esq. 

Manager -t. a. Dibbs. j Accountant— F. N. Biirt. 

Solicitors — Messrs. Want and Johnson. 

Seal Office— &eorffe Street, Sydney- 

Branch Inspector— t. b. Gaden. | Assistant Branch Inspector— G. H. Green. 



Branches in Sydney- 
Eastern Branch : Oxford-street— Colln Brown, Manager, 
Southern B r an c Ti : Ha^'market, George-street south — Jas. Antrobus, Manager, 

Discount Z>ai^«— Tuesdays and Fridays. 

Branches in Ziondon— 39 Lombard Street. 

Directors — J. A. Youl, Esq., C.M.G.; H. G. Smith, Esq.; and Chas. Parbury, Esq. 

i/ana<7fr— Nathaniel Cork. 



Adelong 

Albury 

Annidale 

Bathurst 

Bcga 

Berrima 

Bingera 

Blayney 

Bombala 

Bourke 

Brewarrina 

Brisbane 

San Francisco 
New Tork 



Branches 

Campbell town 

Cannonbar 

Carcoar 

Casino 

Cooma 

Dubbo 

Dungog 

Forbes 

Glen Innes 

Goulbum 



-Ne'w Scuth 

Grafton 

Gunnedah 

Gunning 

Hill End 

Inverell 

Kempsey 

Kiama 

Maitland 

Milton 

Morpeth 



T^ales. 

Moss Vale 

Mudgee 

Murrurundi 

Muswellbrook 

Narrabri 

Newcastle 

Orange 

Parkes 

Parramatta 

Queanbeyan 



I Dalby 



Queensland. 

I. Mackay 



Shoalhaven 

Singleton 

Tamworth 

Wagga Wagga 

Walcna 

Warren 

Wilcannia 

Windsor 

Wollongong 

Yass 

Young. 



Maryborough | Kockhampton 



ENGLAND- 
LONDON .. 
LIVERPOOL 
MANCHESTER .. 

IRELAND 

SCXXTLAND 

VICTORIA 

WESTERN AUSTRALIA. 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA . . 

TASMANIA— 

HOBARTTOWN .. 

LAUNCESTON 
NEW ZEALAND . . 

VALPARAISO 
INDIA, CHINA. & SINGA 
POREf. 

CEYLON 

BATAVIA 

MAURITIUS 
HONOLULU 



Bank of British Columbia, Messrs. Macondray and Go. * > 

Messrs. Drexel, Morgan and Co. 

London and Westminster Bank, London and County Bank. 

Liverpool Union Bank. 

Manchester and Salford Bank. 

Belfast Banking Company and Branches, National Bank and Branches. 

Commercial Bank of Scotland and Branches. 

Bank of Victoria and Branches, National Bank of Australasia, Colonial 

Bank of Australasia, Commercial Bank of Austndia. • 
National Bank of Australasia and Branches. 
National Bank of Australasia and Branches, Bank of South Australia, 

Bank of Adelaide. 

Bank of Van Diemen's Land. 

Bank of Van Diemen's Land. 

National Bank of New Zealand and Branches, Bank of New Zealand 
and Branches. 

Banco Nacional de Chile, 
j The Chartered Bank of India, Australia, and China ; The Cliartered 
( Mercantile Bank of India, London, and China. 
The Chartered Mercantile Bank of India, London, and Cliina. 
The Chartered Bank of India, Australia, and China. 
Messrs. Scott and Co. 
Messrs. Bishop and Co. 



10 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



THE 



Australian Initit Btath §ank 

Incorporated by Act of Council, 1853, 

PAID-UP CAPITAL - - £500,000. 

With power to increase to £1,000,000. 



Jamis S. Mitchell, Esq., Chaixman. 
Alexandeb Leabmonth, Esq. 
Kdwabd Lobd, Esq. 



DirtetoTM: 



Jebbmiah Bbice Rundle, Esq. 
The Hon. John Fbabeb, M.L.C. 
William A. Long, Esq. 



Auditors: 

W. B. Walpobd, Esq. I A. H. J. Baass, Esq. 

^oZtcttor«— Messrs. M*Cabtht and Robebtson. 

Otneral Manager— Vincent Wanostbocht Giblin. 



Fbancis Adaus, Aamtawt Manager, \ Gbeooby G. Blaxland, Accountant, 

London Office: 18 King AA/'illiam- street, E.G. 

Directors : 
James Hendebson, Esq. | Paul Fbedebick Mobgan, Esq. 

William Mobt. Esq. 

Jfano^er— John CfHBiSTiB. 

Bankers — The National Provincial Bank of England. 



Branches in New South Wales: 



Fbancis Adams, 
Albury. 
Armioale. 
Balranald. 
Bathurst. 
Bourke. 
Braidwood. 
Coonabarabran. 
Coonamble. 
Cowra. 



Br^bane. 
Bowen. 

Charters Towers. 
Clermont. 
Cookto¥ni. 



Branch Inspector. 
Deniliquin. 
Forbes. 
Goulbum. 
Grafton. 
Grenfell. 
Gulgong. 
Hay. 
HiU End. 



I Edwabd Gbippith, 
Home Rule. 
Lambton. 
Molong. 
Mudgee. 
Newcastle. 
Orange. 
Parkes. 
Raymond Terrace. 



Branches in Queensland: 

H. P. Abbott, Branch Inspector, 



Assistant Inspector, 
Rylstone. 
Singleton* 
Tenteifield. 
Waffga Wagga. 
Wallsend. 
Wentworth. 
West Maitland. 
Wilcannia. 
Yass. 



Copperfield. 
Glanstone. 
Gympie. 
Ipswich. 



Mackay. 
Maryborough. 
Milcnester. 
Ravenswood. 



Rockhampton. 

Stanthorpe. 

Toowoomba. 

Townsville. 

Warwick. 



The Bank of Victoria ; The E. S. & A. Chartered Bank : The 
National Bank of Australasia ; The Bank of New Zealand. 
The Bank of Van Diemen*s Land. 

The Bank of South Australia ; The National Bank of AustralaBia. 
The Bank of New Zealand : The National Bank of New Zealand 
The Australian Joint Stock Bank, 18 King William-stioet, £.C. 
The Royal Bank of Scotland. 
The Provincial Bank of Ireland. 
Messrs. Brown Brothers k Co. 
Agency of the Bank of British North America. 

The Bank discounts bills, makes advances unon ajmroved security, negotiates produce bills and 
documents, grants drafts and credits upon all its Branches and Agents at current rates, aIlo«-a 
Interest upon fixed deposits, n^fotiates or coUeots bills payable at any of the above-mentioned placses 
or elsewhere ; collects dividends on local stocks for its customers free of commission, also interest 
on debentures, and undertakes the custody of same ; is open to transact every kind of banking 
business, uid to undertake the Agency (rf other Banks upon such terms as may be agreed upon. 



ViCTOBLA ... 

Tasmanu ... 
South Austbalia. 
New Zealand 
London 
Scotland ... 
Ibeland 
New Yobk... 
San Fbancisco 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



11 



THE CITY BANK 



PAID-UP CAPITAL - - - iB240,000. 

With Power to Inorease to £500,000, 



ROBERT GRAY, Esq. 
JOHN ALGER, Esq. 



• Directors : 
JAMES WATSON, Esq., M.L.A., Chairman. 



GEORGE THORNTON, Esq. 
EDWARD WRENCH, Esq. 

Auditors : 

Hon. JOHN BLAXLAND, Esq., M.L.A. 
J. G. RAPHAEL, Esq., pro tew. 

Manager : Secretary : 

WILLIAM NEILL. EDMUND ROUSR 



Accountant : 
THOMAS T. ORTON. 



Solicitor : 
W. W, BILLYARD, Esq. 



HEAD OFFICE: PITT STREET, SYDNEY. 



YOUNG. 



BATHURST. KIAMA. CARCOAR. 



LONDON 

SCOTLAND 

SAN FRANCISCO 

NEW YORK 

HONGKONG 

QUEENSLAND 

VICTORLA. 

SOUTH AUSTRALIA ... 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA 

TASMANIA 

NEW ZEALAND 
NEW CALEDONIA ... 



The London Joint Stock Bank. 
The Commercial Bank of Scotland. 
The Bank of California. 
Laidlaw and Co. 



The Chartered Mercantile Bank of India, London, 
and China. 

The Queensland National Bank. 

The National Bank of Australaaia. 

City of Melbourne Bank, Limited. 

The National Bank of Australasia. 

The Bank of Van Diemen's Land. ' 
The Bank of New Zealand. 
Compagnie de la Nouvelle Caledonie. 



This Bank adopts and transacts all usual Banking business with either of the 

places above mentioned. 



12 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 

NORWICH UNION 

FIRE INSURANCE SOCIETY. 



INSTITUTED. 1797. RE-ORGANISED. 1821. 



PAID-UP CAPITAL - - iB66O,O00. 

RESERVE FUND - HALF A MILLION. 

REVENUE OF VIGTOSIAN BRANCH INVESTED IN THE C0L0N7. 



BiijecioriS: 

EDW. STEWART, Esq., President, 
GEORGE DURRANT, Esq., Vice-President, 



H. S. PATTESON, Esq. 
WALES C. HOTSON, Esq. 
CHARLES E. TUCK, Esq. 
1). DALRYMPLE, Esq., M.P. 
W. R. CLARKE, Esq. 



GEORGE E. SIMPSON, Esq. 
Col. JAMES COCKBURN. 
THOMAS BKEVOR, Esq. 
HENRY BACK, Esq. 
Capt. F. a. CUBITT. 



CHIEF OFFICES: 



Norwich— -Surrey-street. 
Edinbueoh— Princes-street. 
Liverpool— Castle-street. 
London— 50 Fleet-street. 



Dublin— 67 Sackville-street. 
Manchester— 11 Cross-street. 
Birmingham— Bennett's HiU. 
Bristol — Corn-street, 



CHARLES EDWARD BIGNOLD, Esq. 



rpHIS Office is distinguished by its liberality and promptness in the Settl^- 
JL ment of Claims, £2,948,106 having been paid to Insurers for Losses by 
Fire. 

The Policies of this Society cover Losses arising from Lightning aiul 
Explosions of Gas. 

The confidence of the Public in the Norwich Union Fire Office is 
shown by the continuous increase in its Business, whioli now 
exceeds £110,000,000. 



AGENCIES IN THE PRINCIPAL TOWNS OF VICTORIA. 

I-iO"V;rEST Pi.A.TES. 
LOSSES PROMPTLY PAID IN MELBOURNE. 

A8:eiits Wanted in localities wliere tlie Society is not represented. 



VICTORIAN BRANCH CHIEF OFFICE: 

44 QUEEN STREET, MELBOURNE. 

E. F. YENCKEN, Agent. 



OffFIv'ILLL LArAlCCirS ArvSBTr^KB. \:% 



oTbe .^ontbcrn Insunnct (f ompann Itimto. 



EDWARD LAXC-TT-X jAi^li^ L.' 3L::^i5l , W. 6L rbtv\M<is^\ 

r.o:xi>o:N' bo^^jri> op* i>ikectojrs- 

3 BcvuKi^ Gaaarl. 



Sffca^T tiT— O. F. wa: l\ 
The Iiwiw tad. Trwwzmaal Xsnatf Iflaa r >ai» CamjaxT. 9 Stral ^^>-»»(p BwiMtBgs. 

syt>2«:e:t' bojlrt> ok i>rKEcxoit?> 




J. axrrCHELL FR^^I^E rick parsons r ALFERTSMriH 

SscEaTJLiT— JAM£:> LAID LEV. 

►E BO-A.KI> OF r>IKi:CXOI{Sw 

OFFICES: Temp^ ChUBban. 

rOHX DARLENX; DAVID MURR^W 

SccstiTAiT— W. J. FVLLARTOX. 

A A p Mfi c^ 

Malritils RICHARDS«^X ;£ CO. R v^^v .. T. X. WADl A'S SOKS i CO. 

FRSJtA-vruE .- _. BICKLEV i CO. 

MARIXE lySi'RAXCES EFFECTEP OX FAi'dRASLE CCXPrrrCXS. 

DA VI D M OFF AT. Gremt: ^ A^t*^» ^ . 

ESTABLISHED 183S. 



DERWENT & TAMAR 

Fire and Marine Assurance Company. 

CAPITAL - - £100,000. 



H. B. TONKIN, Esq. 
ISAAC WRIGHT, Esq. 



grrettoTS. 



GEORGE SALIER, Esi,K 
JAMES BAYLEY, Esi^. 



Hon. a. KENNERLEY, Esq., M.L.C. 

Manager— C. M. MAXWELL, Esq. 

Accountant— T. M. EVANS, Esq. Solicitor— HY. DOBSON, Es^^ 

Marine Surveyor— JOHN WATSON, Esq. 



AGEN TS — Launceston 

Melbourne 
Adelaide 
Sydney 
London 



C. J. WEEDON & CO. 
JAMES HENTY <fc CO. 
J. S. TURNER, Esq. 
A. L. PARK, Esq. 
RICHARDSON BROS. 4r CO, 



U OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



Imperial Jf ire |nsur ante (H^ompattg ai'^anam 

Capital - - £1,600,000. Invested Funds - - £1,142,814. 

AUSTRALIAN BOARD: 
James Blackwood, Esq. T. .J. Nankivell, Esq. A; J. Wi!ight, Manager. 

MELBOURNE OFFICE, 58 COLLINS STREET WEST. 

AGENCIES THBOUGHOUT AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND. 



XtATZS MODSXIATZ. SSaxniZTT T7ND0T7BT2D. 

Adelaide Marine & Fire Assurance Company. 

MELBOURNE OFFICE - - - 41 FLINDERS LANE WEST. 

Directors — George Martin (Messrs. George Martin and Co)., William Howard Smith (Melbourne 
Steamship Company), H. K. Hogg (Messrs. Hogg, Robinson & Co.) 

Marine Risks accepted at current rates. Claims payable in Melbourne, London, Sydney, or Adelaide, 

as desired. 

THOS. PARSONS, Res. Sec. 



^\t f tgal ^ §mxnl fife %Bmxutt Bamt^, f imiteb, 

89 Queen Street. 



' Directors : 

W. G. LEMPRIERE, Esq., CHAIRMAN. 

JOHN ELLA, Esq. 

H. A. CRAWFORD, Esq. 



WILLIAM M'CULLOCH, Esq. 
HARTLEY WILLIAMS, BsQ. 
Hon. R. RAMSAY, M.P. 



Policy Holders have security of Subscribed Capital, with Share of Profits, 

ROBERT WALKER, Secretary. 

The CoUingwood, Fitzroy, & District 

GAS & COKE COMPANY 

Supplies Gas for Lighting and Cooking in 

Melbourne, Fitzroy, Richmond, Hotham, East CoUingwood, Hawthorn, 

Eew, and Brunswick. 

Services, free of cost, put on at the shortest notice. 
Office— 26 Swanston-street. THOMAS VASEY, Secbetart. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 15 



AdvdAces on Wool, Stations, Stock, &o. 



RGOLDSBROUGH&CO 



WOOL BBOEEBS, 




toth antr Statbn %QtntB, 



ARE PREPARED TO MAKE 

LIBERAL CASH ADYANCES 

ON MOST FAVOURABLE TERMS, 

On the ensuing Clip of Wool, 

Whether for Sale in the Colony or Shipment to London, 

ALSO ON 

STOCK, STATIONS, & ALL DESCRIPTIONS OF SQUATTING SECURITIES. 



Auction Sales of Wool held twice each week during the 
Season, and Sales Of Tallow, Hides, Sheepskins, and other 
Produce on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, throughout the year. 



Station Accounts, and all departments of Financial Business in 
connection with the Pastoral Interest, promptly attended to. 



GOLDSBROUGH'S WOOL WAREHOUSES^ 

MELBOURNE, VICTORIA. 



le OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 

VICTORIA MUTUAL 

InBorporated under " The BaiUling Societie$ Act, 1874." 





PRESIDE.NT ; 




THOUAS ALSTON, Esq, J.P. (AWlon nnd Dro«n), CoUins^trMt. 


Committee: 




Committee: 


H.M. C. OBMMBLL. Beq 




JOHN C. LLOYD, Esq.. 


(Gsmmell. Tockelt ana Co.) 
CoUins-streeli. 


/^^^ 


SIComii8.rtr«tWB,t- 
JAllESUAS0K,E5q,. 


C.J. HAM,Baq.,J.P. 


Grer.Btreet,St.KLMB. 


(C. 1. ana T. Ham), Bwan 


T. MOUEEiY, Esq^J.r 




f^-lwlK^^BKmvA 


<Moobrov, Lush Bn.d Co. 


B.C. HAKMMAN,Baq., 


p n^SHB ^ 












B.A.SUTHEBLAND,K*. 


M. HOOD, Esq., 


CiwaLawOBlMS. 


AuitralUn Bre"My. FHn 


W.C. WATTS. Esq.. 






J. R LA WHENCE, Esq. 
{LB»reDMaaidAdBin),Wil 


Temple Ooait. 




Solicitors: 






M««r!. WILLAN AND SON, Queen-sliw 
THOS. WATTS, E<q, Snanston.slreel. 









SHARES, £10 EACH; ENTRANCE FEE, 6d. PER SHARE. 

Shares oan be taken up at any time. 

The Minlmnm Monthly Subscription Is One Shilling per Share, 

bnt a Member may pay more if he thiuks proper, and may thua make hia Shares 
aniTe sooner at maturity, or be may pay the fnU amount of £10 per Share in oiie 

The Proflta are divided at the end of every six months among aD the 
Shares, in proportion to their value at the beginninfi of tie half-year. The 
Profits ao allotted to Paid-up Shares are paid to the holdera in caBk 

BoTTOnrers ol)tain the advance of the ultimate value of the Shares, 
without any deduetionB for Premiuraa, at the current rata of interest. Aa the 
Shares can be taken at any time, no back payments are required. 

The whole or any part of a Loan can be paid off at any time, the 
value of the Shares being deducted from the amount advanced. 

All UnboTToved Shares oan be withdrawn at a month's notioe. 

OFFICE: 50 ELIZABETH STREET. 



iTHOS. MYEY & CO. 

IMPORTERS. 

IRON AND MACHINERY MERCHANl 



"^y'mi"-^^=itim 




EVEllY DESflill'TJOX OF MACHINEIIY 

(SEW AKD bEUOXDnASD) 
GALVANISED IRON AND OTHEK MKTALS. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER, 



METROPOLITAN 



H. H. HAYTEB. Esq. 

Auditors : 
J. W. F09BERY, Es* 
D. CRAWFORD, Est). 




THOMAS WATTS, Es* 



Smrfitonr; 
Mr. R. O. BENSO 

Office: 32 Collins Street East, Melbourne. 



Tbe recent alterations made in the Rules of tbis Society offer advanta;^ to 
Borrowers unequalled hy any kindred institution. 

The application for an Advance can be made at once and decided in a few days, ng 
dedactioD being made from the a^Mwmpanyin;> tables. Special arraDgementa can b* 
made. The Borrower can redeem at any period. 



TERMS FOE ADVANCES UPON FIRST-CLASS SECURITIES. 
BEPATHEKTS, INCLUDINQ PRINCIFAL AUD IKTEREST, FOS A LOAK OF ftlOO. 



ko. of Yean. 




Uouthly 


AB.onat per 






Repfij-menls. 


Anuum. 


Repnid. 






£ s. d. 




£ .. d. 












Four 




2 10 


SO 










2? 6 


128 10 














15 1 


1 12 9 


IS 13 


137 11 






1 10 


18 


144 a 




12 


1 6 


15 12 




Twelve 


Oil 


1 3 11 


14 7 


172 4 



Deposits received, and Interest allowed thereon at cnrrent rates. 

Current Accounti kept, and interest at tbe rate of FIVE per cent per annum npon 
the minimum monthly balance allowed. 

Cheque Books provided as at ordinary Banks, 



R. G. BENSON, Secretary. 



'hitney, Chambers &Ca 

Wholesale and Retail Ironmongers, 

Iiivil:. an irisij..ai(,u (,f tbeir Large nnti VwicJ St.s'k of 




i-r iF-^ill ■'>"" 




i 



■PtaAOOx Kitcuenehs. 

ElWICTBIIRII GlUTKS. 

''' iJuriiH' EpjiKiti Wasii- 
I'xxtan NiiVfti,TV Clothes 

IKBS. 
lu-'iiuA.N LiWN 

MuWncM. 

IKKO M*M)LR8. 






A Splekddi Show of 
ELKt-TKo -Plated Waiie 7s 

TKi & COFSBE SehviCKS. 

Wine & Liqubdh Frames. 

DjKNKB iBD BnEAKFAST 

CauMTa. 
BrsL-urr Bi)xks. 
BuTTBB Disnits, 
SiUK DrsnBs. 
Spoons jum Pom 



Garben and Verandah 
Choquet SKTsataJlprieBB 

WaTKR FlLTSRS. 

WiBK Meat Sates. 

Ice Chests. 

Table and Poi-ket 

CuTLEivr. 

BBDaTKADS ft; BeDDINO, 

Baths, Sponges, fto. 



WHITNEY, CHAMBERS & CO 
Oonier of CoHins and Swanston streets, Melliurne. 



2) OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 




WILLCOX & GIBBS' 

OXKUIKE ABISRICAN SnXHT 

Sewing lacMne 



The only Machine that combines all the 
essential quoIilicationB of a Perfect Family 
Sewing Machine, viz., Simplicity, 

" Adaptation to all kinds of Family 
Sewing, Ease of Management, aiia 

' Lightness of Running. 

MACK & ELLIS, 80 Collins Street East. 

IMPOKTERS AND SOLE AGENTS 
For the WILLCOX & GIBBS MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 

Hhome shuttle^ 

GENUINE AMERICAN LOCK-STITCH 



Tlii3 ia without doulit the Best Hand Sewing Machine in the World. 
1111,1 is Guaraiitee<l by Uie mamitactiirerH for Five Years. It will Hem, t\-ii. 
Kiud, Cord, Kraid, Seam, Tuuk, RiilHe, Hemstitch, Gatlier and Sew oii at \.\.l- 
same time, aiid will uork e<iually well ou Silk, Linen, AVoollen and Cotton Cond?. 
witJi Silk, Linen and Cotton Thread 

SIMPLE, COBIPACT, EFFICIENT, DURABLE AHD COKFLETB. 

MACK & ELLIS, General Sewing Machine Agency, 

80 COLLINS STREET EAST. 

^O.CK & ELLIST 

■Wholesale Manufacturers 

Patent Frillings, "Skirts, Costumes, 

Boys' Knickerbocker Suits, Ladies' and Chidren's 
Underclothing, Ac. Ac. 

80 COLLINS STREET EAST. Opposite Athen^um. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 21 



E. STEIN FELD, 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 



FURMTURE 



IMPORTER OF GERMAN, FRENCH, AND ENGLISH 




X .A. 3Nr o ^ 



CABINET & UPHOLSTERY 

79 ELIZABETH STREET, 

(Adjoining Messrs. James M'Ewan and Go.) 

MELBOURNE, 

And at 37 d 39 BRIDGE STREET, BALLARAT. 



Drawing, Dining, and Bedroom Suites 

. (IN EVERY STYLE) 

TO SUIT ALL CLASSES OF PURCHASERS. 



pq 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVEETISBB. 



s " HE? is 




J S * i II * I ' I i H 5 2 



Swallow & Ariell 



MANUFACTURERS 



SHIP, CABIN, and DOG'S 

SCUITS 




AND ALL KINDS OF 



MACHINE, FANCY, AND DESSERT 



X s o XT X a:> s. 




AlfllBUlY ©AKES. 



CHRISTMAS CAKES, &o. 



Manufaotory: 



Office and Store: 

11 Flinders St. ^est. 



MELBOURNE. 

b2 



24 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



BRISCOE & CO., 

WHOLESALE, RETAIL & FURNISHING 




And Iron HEerohants, 

11 COLLmS STREET EAST, 

AND 

245 ELIZABETH STEEET NORTH, MELBOURNE. 

MP0RTER8 OF IRONMONGERY 

SUITABLE FOR 

^cpxntkxB, Jfarmers, §mlkrs, €anixndaxs, 

AND PRIVATE FAMILIES. 

BRZSOOB ft 00. IwTo al-vrayi in atook a fine Mleotion of 

MARBLE AND ENAMELLED SLATE CHIMNEY PIECES 

REGISTER STOVES, FENDERS, FIRE IRONS. 

KITCHEN RANGES, AMERICAN STOVES. 

ELECTRO-PLATE TEA AND COFFEE SERVICES, URNS. 

• BISCUIT BOXES, CRUETS, SALVERS. 

SPOONS, FORKS, AND TABLE CUTLERY. 

CRYSTAL AND BRONZED GASALIERS. 

HALL LAMPS, BRACKETS. 

CRYSTAL AND BRONZED KEROLIERS. 

KEROSENE LAMPS. 



Inspection is respectfully invited. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 




Little Wanzbr 

And 'Waazer A 
Se^ving Machines 



^M'LEANBR08.&RIGG 



(wn^hV^ck). FuTUiahing and General Hardware 

-with: is ExxEaAs, Dealers, 

May bs pnwurad from our Affonw in 

?^ AtSfz^"™*""" *"* 69 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne. 

THE CELEBRATED 

DIAMOND SPRING MATTRESS, 

M'LEAN BROS. & RIQQ, MELBOURNE. 



Oval Samson Fencestg Wire 

WWch shows a saving of FORTY PER CENT, in the cost of Wire Fendng, 
Circulars on applicaliim. 

M'LEAN BROS. & RIGQ, MELBOURNE. 



M" 



If 'LEAN BROS. & RIGO, IMPORTERS and DEALERS in every description 
of BritiBli, Foreign and American HARDWARE, TOOLS and LABOUR 
SATING IMPLEMENTS. The Utest Novelties in all the above Branches con- 
tinnally arriving. 



69 Elizabeth Street, UeHiffome, Viotoiia. 



26 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 

ESTABLISHED 1854. 

RoBisoN Bros. & Co. 

Coppersmiths, Brassfoimders, Plumbers, 

31 Flinders Street West, lEel1}ounLe. 

im:i>obtebs of 

SHEET COPPER AND BRASS, COPPER AND BRASS TUBE. 

WROUGHT IRON TUBE AND FITTINGS (BLACK AND GALVANISED), 

BOILER TUBES, HYDRAULIC TUBES, CAST-IRON PIPES, 

ENGLISH AND AMERICAN PUMPS, DONKEY PUMPS, 

BOILER PLATE, SHEET AND BAR IRON, 

HYDRAULIC, VACUUM AND STEAM GAUGES, WATER METERS, 

LEATHER BELTING, RUBBER AND CANVAS HOSE, 
SHEET RUBBER & INSERTION, ENGINE PACKING, DIVING DRESSES, 

AND 

Eybij Desoription of Goods connected witli the above Branches. 

ICanufacturers of 

Steam Engines and Boilers, Hjdranlio and American Hoists. 

Hjdranlic Pumps and Presses, Hydraulic Rams. 

Pumps for Hand, Horse, Windmill, and Steam Power. 

Steam Ck>ndensers, Injectors and Electors. 

Steam Stop Valves, Safety Valves. 

Feed Water Heaters, Feed Pumps, Lubricators. 

Sluice Valves, Fire Plugs, Hydrants. 

Centrifugals, Air Pumps, Wetzel Pans, Glarifiers, Vacuum Pans. 

Ice Machines, Stills, Refrigerators, Attemperators. 

Steam Distributors, Mashers, Fining Machines, Steam Coils. 

Brine Pumps, Preserving Pans. 

Engineers' and Plumbers* Brasswork. 



SHEET LEAD, LEAD PIPE, AND COMPOSITION GAS TUBE. 



Aebated Water Manu- 

FACTUBBRS. 

Brbwebs. 

CaiOMLE MANXnrACTUREBS. 

Confectioners. 
Distillers. 



Sffachinery fbr 

Gas Works. 
Glue Makers. 
Jam Makers. 
Meat Preservers. 
Rope Makers. 
Tallow Refiners. • 
Wool Scourers, &c. &c. 



Soap Makers. 

SgUATTERS. 

SuoAR Refiners. 

Tanners. 

Tobacco MANUFAcruBXRa. 

Waterworks. 



AVorks: Yarra Bank, Melbourne, 



Hughes & Harvey, 

GALVANISERS, 

lianttfattttring Ciitsmitl]S, 

AND COPPER. BRASS AND SHEET-IRON WORKERS. 



H. and H. beg to draw attention to the 
dass of Goods exhibited, as per Catalogue, 
and to state that purchasers can toe sup- 
plied -Nwith any class of Goods required in 
the trade, and forwarded to any part of 
tte Colonies, carefully packed. 



IM LONSDALE ST. EAST, llellounM, 

OPPOSITE WESLBTAN CHURCH. 



Shep Tmughlitgi Well Buckets, and Iron Water Tanks, 

TO ANY SIZE, 

LETTERS CUT IN COPPER OB ZINC, FOR BRANDINO. 



SHEET XROIT PBE.FOR.A.TBD 

FOE MACHINE PUBP08ES, TO ANY BIZE. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 




WORLD-RENOWNED CHAMPION SINGLE & DOUBLE FURROW PLOUGHS. 



lo dispv^^ment to this cnterprinnc 

laniBi, NBtlonsl tind Govern 
.to £M to £10 ; or the mer: 
won tha highest diplomas d 

s for Ihe London Exhibition 




Labour-saving principle. — PaUnt Elastic Spring Seals. — Unrivalled /or Li^nest 
in Draught.— Worked with lino Light Iforiies.— Double and Single Speei 
FIRST PHIZES STarded b 



ISIl i Vletoriin AKrtouHui»l Bodoiy 

1BT4 I Bin»ton Agricultunl Show ISOtolS^i 

"" imerattioiml BihibilioD 188atol887. 

Manufactory at NoiHh Melbourne Station. 

Show Rooms, 83 <& 85 £lizabeth-st N., MelboTne. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 29 

SWAN & WHITE'S 

60 AND 62 ELIZABETH STREET NORTH. 

/ 




SWAN ft WHITE, in order to meet the requiretnenta of Farmers for the 
coming harvest, at« now prepared to supply, in addition to their well-known 
Double and Single Speed Back Delivery Reapers, Roy's Patent Self-Raking 
Reaper, which, as a Side-Delivery, is unequalled for Lightness of Draogbt 
&nd the general manner in which the work is performed. It delivers the sheaves 
very compactly and evenly ; and as the machine requires only one man to work it, 
a. ^;eat saving is effected. 

The whole of the front of the Platform can be instantly raised over any 
obstacle which ma_y be in the way, or can be depressed in order to allow the 
Machine to cnt gram which may have been beaten dTown. 

Theyaro also making a Mowing Maoblne with all the Latest and Best 
ImprOTemente, which is guaranteed to be second to none. It is exceedingly 



light in draught, cuts wonderfully clean, and is strong, simple and durable. 

Having enlarged and made considerable improvements in their pros 
SWAN * WmTE can now offer Ranaome's ThreshlilK Maohinea, witii 



Straw Elevator and all the Latest Improvements, viith MarenaU'S Celebrated 
Engines, from 7 to 10 horse power; also, Bentall's Cbaffoutters, all sizes. 

A Large Stock of Colonially-made Chaffcutters and Horse Powers, all sizefl; 
Com Crushers, Ploughs (Colonial and Imported, also aU Fittings for same). 
Harrows, Cnltivatois, Horse Hay Rakes, Ik., always on hand. 

N.B.-PRIGE LISTS & ILLUSTRATIONS FREE BY POST ON APPLICATIOIt. 



CO & 62 ELIZABETH STREET NORTH, MELBOUSNB. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVEETISEIL 




Established 1853. 



T. ROBINSON & CO., 

Agricultural Implement Manufacturers 

AND MACHINERY IMPORTERS, 

247 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne. 




At the National Agricultural Society's FIKI.D TRIAL of Ploughs, held on the aCth 
and 21st May, 1875, T. ROBINSON and CO. were awarded the 

Soputmnit of AsrlcTUture's Flf at Prize (£6) for tlie Beat SonU*- 
Forro'V FIoheIi. 

Tha ConditionB at the trial were — Lightness of Draught, as tested by the Dynanko- 
meter; General Quality of Work; Simplicity of Conetnictioii combined with Strength; im 
all these points the Judges unanunoualy awarded T. BOBIHSON k Co. the Boud'a Priie. 





T 


3st of Dyn 


amometef: 






H. LBUNOir. 


a. QUAKT ft 00. 




4S1> 

507 ^.Average 182. 

458/ 


n 


►Average B22. 


6771 

B91 V Average 377. 
666/ 


sesi 

604 Average 686. 
58fl 



Also, Bole Affsnts lor Vlctorln tor 

MARSHALL, SONS & CO.'S PATENT PORTABLE STEAM ENGINES & STEAM MAGHIKERV. 

Oalalogtitt forajanJUd on api^icotion. 

Admiebs— 247 ELIZABETH 8TEEET, MELBOUEMB. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVKRTISEB. X 

JOSEPH NICHOLSON'S 



CELEBBATED 



Prize Reaping and Mowing Machines. 




PATENT DOTTBL&SPEED REAPING 4 MOWING MACHINE, 

aiKPIA STBONQ, BASILT HAHACUED, and tha Hiwt imraUe of all IlMp«n. 

J. N.'b EEAPING and MOWING MACHINES 

HAVE NEVER BEEN DEFEATED, 



TRIAL held 24th NoTsmber, 187i, the Renpera wars awarded FIRST and SECOND 
FRIZES againet all other maken. The MOWING MACHINES also obtainnd 
the FIRST and SECOND PRIZES. 
FmST-OLASS FfilZES AWASDED TO DOUBLE-S^EB BEAPEB. 

FiiHt Prize— GOLD MEDAL, Dunedin Agricultarel Show. 

Piiet Prize— NaUonal Agricultural Sodety of Tictoria after (rial in the field. 

Sint Prize— Ballarat ABTicaltantl Show. 

Firet Prize— SILVER MEDAL, Mutland, N.3.W., Agricultnntl Society, 

Pint Prize— SILVER MEDAL, Melbourne Intercokmul Ezhibitioo. 

Flnt Prize — Gippeland A^cultural Show. 

Firet Prize — G™long Agncultoral Show. 

Judges' Certiiicate-O^ngford, Tasmania, as the Best Reaper for general purpoas*. 

First Prize— Beaufort Agricultural Show. 

FiiM Prize — Smeaton Agricultural Show. 

Firet Prize— Clunea Agncultnral Show. 

FliBt Prize — Ararat Agricultural Show. 

FirBt Prize — Sale Agricultoral Show. 

23 BOUVEiaS STKEET, ICELBOURirE. 

Cr CATALOODES SENT FREE BY POST. "W 



32 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 

THOS. HENDERSON & CO. 




Manufacturers of Reaping and Mowing Machines, 

STRIPPERS, WINNOWING MACHINES, CORK SCREENS, 
HORSE WORKS, CHAFF CUTTERS, 
SINGLE AHD DOUBLE FURROW PLOUGHS, HARROWS, SCARIFIERS, EARTH SCOOPS, 

And every description of AGBICULTUEAL MACHINERY. 
lUuilrated Calalogna post frte on applieiUion. 

AgrionltRral Haohine Works, 89, 91, & 95 Elizabeth-st. Nortli, 

M E L B O U EN E, 

MALDEN ISLAND GUANO. 



To enable Farmers to avail themselves of this valuable Guano, the 
Importers have decided to allow the following terms: — 

X7 lOs. W ^*>°) -^^ Credit, payable on the let day of 
April the following year, for all Onauo purohaeed during 
the Season ; or J^Q 15s. P^i" Ton, Net Gash. 

Delivered in Melbourne (bags included). 

Ouano is carried per Kail at Special Low Rates. 



GEICE.SUMNEE & CO., 

24 Elindns Lane West, Uelboame. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 33 

LAW, SOMNBR & GO., 

WHOLESALE AND EETAIL 

s E E ZD s im: El nsr, 

87 ^^ FARMER'S ALLEY, 

SWAN8T0N-ST. j^^^ Li..,, o^m.. s.,... 

And Octagon, Dunedin, New Zealand. 

Agents for Mr. George Brunning, St. Kllda Nurseries, Briihton Road. 

C. F. CEESWELL, 

Plant & Seed Merchant, 

37 8WAN8TON ST„ MELBOURNE, VICTORIA; 

Also, 

MURRAY ST., HOBART TOWN, TASMANIA; 
478 fleorge-st,, Sydney, New South Wales. 



44 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTI8BE. 

EOWDEN BEOTHERS 



MANDFACTUREB8 OF 



74 LITTLE COLLINS STREET, Near Russell-street, 

Oalvanialnff 'Works 35 Latrobe Street Melbourne. 




VentUatOTB 
to ClmrcIieB, 
SctioolB, Pnhflc 



Pp ce L sts on Applicat 



A. R. WALKER, 



GAS STOVES & C6L0NIAL OVENS, 

40 LATROBE STREET WEST. 



TTHE latest improvements have been made in these Stoves, rendering them the 
■^ most perfect that have yat been introdnced to public notice. 

Economy, effectiveness, and cleanlineas, have been the desideratum of the 
msnufactarer; and he confidently solicits inspection and trial from those to whom 
economy and the highest efficiency in the culinary department of their establish- 
ment is a sine qtia non. 

A laige assortment of the various kinds may be seen in operation at the 
Maunfoctory, 40 Latrobe Street West, where every infonnation c^ be obtained. 



PRICES FROM £.3 lOs. 

CAN BE HAP FROM ALL IBONUOHQEfiS. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISBB. 



Gas Cooking Apparatus 



s 

£ 
I 






^ ^ 







S p. 

O El 



VlTABTIllS 

nflwt the hut 
porpow of ro 
tbaorm with 



IS faom^a old lyvb 
iplued^<ihMetbe!ol 
le hut ; ths Hme ba 



miof Ou CookiDB. wh 

■ner belo^ fthove tbo J 
InK at th« nUD* time 
, Aehe^ litlwnbr 



■t UAllr^ a 



sued, the combuatlon Is rendered compter 
ft t^:!!!!^ dliidbntlon of hut nil ova the 
n «}!■ •«»»•• nnw In uje^ ui, oven la klwni 
Hot » Joint in u ordi- 



__ F_ . .»_.ia tha lb& couamMDtljp It la & comniDD owuirence for t Joint in u oiSi- 

.tobarkwInonetairtuUlbunitlamnotlMr. Tlita li prevented bj the hot »lr (urrouodlmr 

rsH mrruKed tbitt » iunlb dliuiar »n be cooked witbout the aid otu! 

lo«H proctMM or routine, UUog, bollinc. griUli^', or touting, an lU tie 

«( on b« reeuliled to Bnatul ulatr bj the ndlunmenti with which 



hotMtiDlliMpHt 

nuT oven to be t&w 

tlie oven. Thus itoTH m h mrrmnged 

othn ii^dlanoe. The voriooi proctuas 

carried oti, and each procev can be n 

each novel) atted. 

F. ■w.a.XjI-iIS sc .aonsrs, 
49 Otter-st., and 211, 213, and 215 Wflllington-st., GoUmgmiod, 



■h procea* can be regulated to inatul 






36 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



ABYSSINIAN TUBE WELL PUMPS, 



JOHN DANKS, 



42 Bourke Street West, IffeHsoume. 



SLUICE VALVES, FIRE PLUGS, STAND PIPES, 



STOP AND BIB COCKS FOR WATER SUPPLY. 

OtBB Works for Towns or Mansions, of the most approved make, 
including Mains, Meters, Service Pipes, and every description of 
Gas Fittings. 

Force and Lift Pumps, of the best make, for every purpose. 

The Victorian Windmill, for Water Pumping and other Works. 

Stop Valves, in Iron and Brass, all sizes. 

Improved Sheep Washing Jets. 

Self-acting Valves for Sheep Troughs. 

And every description of Engineers' ^ Plumbers' Brasswork. 



And on Sale the following- 
Wilson's Donkey Pumps 
Special Steam Pumps 
Pressure and Vacuum Gauges 
Giffard's, Gresham's, and Friedman's 
- Injectors 

Roscoe's, and Suet Lubricators 
Sheet Pewter, Block Tin 
Enamel Sinks and Urinals 
Lieuvain's Patent Needle Lubricators 
Jennings', Kirl^wood's, and other Closets 
Water Meters 

Indiarubber and Patent Canvas Hose 
Babbitt's Antifriction MetaL 



Cast-iron Pipes, for Gas and Water 

Fireclay Retorts, Fire Bricks and Clay 

Wrought Iron Pipe, Black and Galvan- 
ized 

Com DO., Lead, Brass and Copper Pipe 

Gas Fittings 

Globes, Baths, Plumbers' Earthenware 

High-pressure Ta^, Stocks and Dies, 
Gas Stoves, Indiarubber Hose 

Dry and Wet Gas Meters 

Sheet Copper and Brass 

Copper and Brass Wire 

Lathes— Screw, Cutting and Surfacing 

AND EVERT DBSCBIFTION OV 

COPPERSMITHS', PLUMBERS', and GASFITTERS' MATERIAL. 

S£B EXHIBITS. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGIIE ADVERTISER. 37 

DAVID MUNRO&CO. 

UACEHTERY ICERCHAITTS, 

154 (^TTElEIir ST, nyCEXiSOTJIiaiTE. 




ENGINES, BOILEHS, 

MiTiiTig, Sawing, and Flonr Uill ICaohinery 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION, NEW AND SECONDHAND. 

ENGIKEEES' TOOLS 4 EAILWAY CONTMOTOES' PLANT, 



Or FOR HIRE on a Purchasing Lease. 
Deposit and B«nts nefconel ai part paTuunt. 



PURCHASERS AND VALUATORS OF MACHINERY. 



Sr ftwlal ^polntsunt tc E. B. IL tlis Duke of Bdlabv 
MASVCACTi 
ALCOCK 

COMBINATION DINING AJ^D BlLLIAIiD T^ 

CJiS DB ALTEItBli I'm iriTliniC ITfU'iME iH itM fkriKfT 




,1ft ntlllf tu WBJV,,,. 



F. T. V/IMBLE. 

SIASliFAlTUilEli OF 

f fttti'jii'css !ii>(l|Litl\oj)i[ii^liii;|]i;iiilinig : 

VARNISHES, &C. 

PRINTERS' AND BINDERS' SUNDRIES. 

70 Little Collins Street Ej| 

ia:EX.BOTr»3irE. 

VlsttDia ure iDvttEd to insiicct Ilio FuoLor;. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER, 




40 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISEE. 



lEIfRT P. WELCH & CO, 



Imprfers & ^^iuuMmm' %^mh. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR- 

Cylark and Co.'s Revolving Steel Shutters. 
Eastons and Anderson's Centrifugal Pumps. 
Fowler and Co.*s Steam Plougliing Machinery. 
Galloway and Co.'s Nails, Floor Brads, etc. 

Hartley and Co.'s Sheet, Rough, Plate, Coloured and Ornamental Glass. 
Hill and Smith's Sheep Fencing ; Entrance, Field and Garden Gates. 
Hodkinson and Clarke's Metal Venetian Blinds. 
IJpscorabeand Co.'s Patent Water Filters. 

Lowe, Sleigh, Bevan and Co.'s Carriage and Buggy Lamps, Fittings, and Coach- 
builders' Ironmongery. 
Nicholson and Son's Endues and Agricultural Machinery. 
Penney and Co.'s Com Screens and Grain-Cleaning Machines. 
Sowerby and Co. 's Cut and Pressed Glassware. 
Webster and Co.'s Mining Ropes, etc., etc., etc. 



H. P. W. & Co. are prepared to execute INDENTS for any of the above 
Manufacturers FREE OP COMMISSION, and for goods of every description 
at Lowest Current Rates. 

AGENCY FOR THE 

PATENT SELF-OOILING EEVOLVING STEEL SHUTTERS 

Which are being so extensively used for closing 



Shop Fronts, 
Book Cases, 
Cupboards, 
Drapers' Fittings, 



Doorways, 
Fireplaces, 
Hatchways of Ships, 
Railway Sheds, 



Office Fittings, 
Wardrobes, 
Warehouses, 
&c. &c. 



ALSO FOB THE 

WINDO^A^ BLIND OF THE PERIOD. 

(PATENT METALLIC VENETIANS.) 

These Blinds are manufactured from metal of the thickness of notepaper ; are light, 
durable and elegant; and when drawn up occupy less than h^ the space of 
wooden blinds. 

H. P. W. & Co. have for some years past confined themselves to represent in i; 
English Manufacturers in this market, and receiving consignments of English and 
Foreign Goods ; and also act as Agents for Absentees from the colony for Purchase 
and Disposal of Property, Collection of Rents, &c. 



Offices «Sc Warehouse, 172 QUEEN STREET 

Engine Yards, MORAY STREET, YARRA BANK. 

♦ 

And at Pitt St., SYDNEY, and 35 Gresham St., L0ND0>'. 



^^wwuziAZ. jATX^vcT A.:?v£5rr.soX -^ 



BRIGHT BROTHERS cl CO. 

AGEXrS FOR 

THE EASTESJ A5D AIISTSAIIAJ 3QIL 3TBAX vW 
Limited, via Toetk Scnhs. 

THE LIVERPOOL AJSTD AUSTSALIiS ITAYKIJLTIO^J CW 
And EAGLE LOB of STEAM sad SAIUXa SHIFSk 
to and fiom England. 

THE STEAMER "HERO," to and from AUCn.ANI>, N.2, 



BRIGHT BROTHERS & CX), 

SMELTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

ANTIMONY, "STAR REGULUS." 



BRIGHT BROTHERS & CX). 

AGENTS FOR THE SALE OF 

X: I^ XT "V X .A. N GII-X7Jk»TO, 

MILNER'S FIRE-RESISTING SAFES, 

AND FOB 

The "VICTORY" Printing Machine Co., Liymvaau, 
And COWAN & CO., Paper Manufacturkiw, Kmsuvmu. 



IHBSHTS promptily executed from all parte of tbe World* 

g 



42 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



Jas. F. M'Kenzie & Co., 



€dtt ^ §pia pertjants, 



AND 

Mi\.NUFACTURERS OF 

Cocoa Oatmeal 

Chocolate Maize Meal 

Mustard Groats 

Chicory Pearl Barley 



&c. &c. 



AWARDED FIRST PRIZE 
For all Goods Exhibited Melbourne Interoolonial Exhibition, 1875. 



J. F. M*K. and Co. having received from England the most improved Machinery, 
are now manufacturing Hom<eopathic, Pearl, and Soluble Cocoa, and Chocolate. 
Their preparations being fresh made from the best Trinidad Cocoa Nuts, wiU be found 
much superior to the imported 

J. F. M*K. and Co. are also manufacturing Mustabd, from Victorian-grown Mustard 
seed. It only requires a trial to prove its quality. 



Government Analytical Laboratory, Melbonme, 14th January, 1878. 
I have analysed samples of Cocoa and Chocolate, manufactured by Messrs. Jas. F. IfKeniie and 
Co., Queen-street, Melbourne. I found them to be wholesome, fragrant, and fresh preparationa of the 
Cocoa Bean. (Signed) WM. JOHNSON, Government Analytical Chemist 



I have examined samples of Mustabd, labelled "Genuine," mannfactoied by Messrs. Jas. F. 
M'Kenxie and Co., Queen-street, Melbourne, and found it to be entirely free from any artifldal colour* 
ing, or any other admixture, and to possess the active stimulating properties characteristic of part 
flour of mustard. (Signed) WM. JOHNSON, Government Analytical Chanist. 



.AWARDED INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION MEDAL. 

3 & 6 QUEEN ST., MELBOURNE. 



OFPICUL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER 



CLAYTON & SHUTTLEWORTH 

Agricultural & General Engineers, 

stamp End Works, Lincoln, England. 




IMPROVED TRACTION ENGINE, from a to 14 tp. 

THE BboTB fofrmvlng nprewnts one of C. & R.'b Impniveil Traotlon Engines. An impoTtant ts 



nme Urae are kept In gsu uid receiie the full power from Ihe Bngine, The abseooe ol Ibia tnCure 
la > TncUon Ei^iiia li a def«C, [)etriiseiital a)ike to Ita etfidenoj and dutublllt;. 
CLA7TDH & SHUTTLEVOETH'S POBTASLE STEAU EITGINES, tram 4 to 30 b^ 
~ ~ - . - - - I CyUutler, feed 



Water Hating ApparAtoa, e 



atteuUle tor adjnacmait or i 

tOKB at CLITTOH b BHUTTl 

£Hh Engine is fitted itltt 
Khlttlt^ and la anppUed with 



■Grilug parts re 



Bpeclaiiy 



Always forjnod HigHTi(F»i^h<.\|> f^,^ 






Lple diEDenalDDB, far covering up and protecting 
Dua juiKiuB injLu woMuer vi uiiu, flriuf tooli, ol] Can, a ccmpLete set cf wrenclia, screw bunmei 
and (pan gangg glaseeg. tree at eitr^ charge. 

BOBIZOHTiL FIXED & FOBTABLE FIXED 8TEAU EIGISES, frnm 4 to 40 Lp. 
PATDITTXnSaEDFBAtlED THBASHING HACRIBES, fi«i» 30. ein. to dft. 6in. Dnmii. 

AH CUTTON It BHDITLKWORTH's Thrashing Machina are made with Patent Trnssed Frame, Im." 
moved Bttttj Feed-Board, Steel Tlrum Sntn^le, Fatcut Rolled Steel Beater Flatea, Coolaon'a Faten' 
§|wtng Hangoi, 0004*8 Fatent Bbaker, and all other known IraprCTemEuU, rendering tbem tb* 
moit pnteot and efflcient made. Thejr »ie oonatruoted either with Bruckaliav St Undfrfaill's Patent, 
BlMt MSntor. or the old itjle of Cap ElsTator, without Bnj diSereuce in price. All iliilitiiiic 
Uaotalnea an fitted sftb a Futaiit Adjottibi* Botarjr Screen. 

Thil improred cUh oT Uaoblne prcHnta manj adTanta^s orer tbe older Forms of Piniahine 
UadilDei, The peculiar conitncUon of tlie fmniOK providw room for a mnch larger inrfaoe at 
aeeond drmlin and flntohlng apparaMa ■Mcltln the framing, huiead of projecting from the side. 
Tboa tbo new Uadiine presents a twofold adTautage : it Is much more compact, and jet it dresiea 

. . it tbrasbing all Uods < 
ai a single operation. 

PntaUa Floor Hills, with Fnnob Burr or I _. _ 
diusatir; S>t BBndtei, Sot- 1, S, and 8; Fmdi 

mtUr; Boilar TnbsB, Finban, Liatlier Belting:, and L , 

and Pamay k Co.'i A^initable Botaiy Corn Sctmiu; CMtrlfticu Pnm^ Appdd'a FatMtt. 

WM. SHUTTLEWORTH, AGENT, 160 QUEEN STREET, MELBOURNE. 



irbTgUra OraritDdai, from 2ft. Sin. 
ill Burr HillstoiML from tOin- to H _ 
i,L>atIierB«lting:,andallkindtafI>ii;luat«s; RalnforUiftSai' 



>D application. 



«2 



44 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 





LIAl 




NUTTING & LEEK 

16 Little Collins Street East, 



ton t)^ Cin llntt &r krs 





MANUFACTURERS OF 

Plunge, Pillar, & Shower Baths with Force Pumps, 

Hip and Sitz Baths. 

Sponging and Children's Baths. 

Portable Shower Baths and Toilet Sets, in variety. 

special patterns. 

Gas Stoves, with Cooking Utensils. 

Outside Lamps, all descriptions. 

Tea, Coffee and Wine Heaters, in Brass, Copper and 

Block Tin. 

Stampers and Pressers. 

Perforated Brass, Tin, Zinc and Copper, in variety, 

of ornamental patterns. 



AR JL IS x 16 JAxAJN JNTERS 

AND WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS. 



OmClAL CATAIjL>;rE ADVERTIS^ER 



4J( 



THOIAS GAITNT, 

lltatc|maktr, |ttofUtr, anb t^ptician, 

14 Bonrke-street E., Comer of the fioyal Aicade* 

The oidy Watch SuvfiMrtunfr im the Avstnltes ColoMies, 

[See Gold and SOrer Medak, and Rcpoite of the London, Mdbovnie. & S^>ln<jr £\hibitioi)9kl 



Has far iospeciKNi 

A LABGS ASiSOBTlCKNT 

OP 

Ckild, Fieseststlmi. and 
otlier Watcbes, 

OpcD'Caoed and Hnntiii^, at 
every price. 
From £20 to 80 Gmsu 



Ladies' EngUsh hewtn. 

From £15 to £45. 



Ladies' Genevas, 

From £5 Ids. to £^. 



A Large and varied Assort- 
ment of 

Wedding, Btrthday, and 
Cbristmas Presents, 

Suitable for Ladies and Gen- 
tlemeiL 




Has alwi^^rs on haini^ really 
reipiiat^d for iuip> 

Sihrwr Hoatiat and Opea* 

fiieed, really reliaMe, 

Bai^ish Lew Watdiet, 

Fnwi £7 lOsL. U% £17 17a. 



ALSO, 

Ceatre Seeoads aad lade* 

peadeat Seooadt, aad 

Ckroaographe, 

For Raciiis: and 8ciei\UAc 
Purposes. 

Silver Qeaevat, 

From £3 to £7. ro-<>xamhmt 

and wiurantiKi. 



Oold-moanted Qaaadeaf 

and Shell Jewelltry« aad 

Emu £^1^8 aouated. 

In Silver or Klcv^troplatc^, for 
I'rosenU to frioi^Os at home. 




Best Brazilian Pebble Spectacles, warranted pure and correctly ground. 

The only Optician in the Australian Colonies who received 

Honorable Mention for Pebbles and Colonial-made Speotaoles at 

the Ezbibition, 1866; 

Gold and Silver Medals at the Exhibition, 1872-73. 



rpHOMAS GAUNT is now enabled to REPAIR THEODOLITICS autl othfr 
1 SURVEYING AND SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS on the proiniMi'U in a 
manner equal to London. 

ACiorosoopes made to order, or any parts added. 

All Repairs Etceeuted on the Premises nnder his Personal Jnsifcction, 



AV-A.TCI£M^K:EE, JETV-ELTL-ER, J\.ND 01»TICIAN. 
ROYAL ARCADE, 14 BOURKE STREET EAST, MELBOURNIi:. 



46 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 




BY APPOINTMENT TO HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR AND TO THE VICTORIAN RIFLE ASSOCIATION 

66 ELIZABETH STREET. 

Directly opposite tbe "Age" office. 

Begs to return his sincere thanks to his numerous patrons and the public generally 
for tiieir past support, and to inform them that he has on sale sreech-Io&dillg 
GXULB of the newest and most approved patents, ranging in price from £5 to £45 

each; Breech-loading Rifles, of all patterns and nukkers; Breech-Ioading 

BevolverS} of all patterns and prices ; first-class second-hand Muzzle-loading 
GxULBy by the best English makers.. 

Rifles of all kinds, suitable for kangaroo hunting; all the appurtenances 
required both for breech and muzzle loading guns, &c. 

ATntmiTiit inTi of all sorts on hand. Every article required either by the 
volunteer or sportsman. 

Rifles Sighted according to the V.R.A. Regulations. 

Bipairs of aU kinds executed in a workmanlike manner. Breech-loading Chins Made to Order, 

J. W. R. respectfully invites gentlemen requiring goods in the above line to inspect 
one of the best stocks in the Southern Hemi8i>here, and in case of selection promises tnem 
ample satisfaction with his mode of doing business. N. B.— Condition of sale unequalled. 

PLEASE NOTE ADDRESS. 



SMITH, FERGUSON & CO. 

(J. Allan Smith, John Ferguson, James Baird.) 

WH0.LE8ALE GROCERS, 



Wm, ^jirit i Ir0l)isi0n 




AND GENERAL IMPORTERS, 



30 AND 32 FLINDERS LANE WEST, MELBOURNE. 



ATutralian Agents for the celebrated AXTCHTEBTOOL WHISSY. 



MflCLU. CJLTADDenS Ju>vnxir<iKs: 



E. WHITEHEAD & CO. 

07-GQUms StNot Sist» 

StationerS) EngrayerS) & Litho^pheis, 

S. W. 4 Col b% to intern tik« Public ttt«t tti«y kkv^ « 

LABGE STOCK OF FANCY & GENERAL STATIO>iKR\\ 

MONOGRAMS AND CRESTS 

Beantifolly EngnTcd for Embossiuis^ c«i NoW P»p«r iMiv\ iu vakI^hu^ 

(See Specimens, ExMbition)^ 
Plain Emlrassmg, with Initials, done without Extra Charto« Xl^^ 
flans, ft Show Cards Lithosnraphed. Aoconnt Books, Lodg«rt> Ho. ft«k 
Bill Heads, Note Headings, ftc. 

BALL PROGRAMMES. INVITATION NOTES, 

WEDDING & VISITING CARDS ENGRAVKD & IMilNTKlV 

Artists' Materials, Colours, Palettes, Bruahoa, &o. 



WILLIAM DETMOLD, 

IMPORTER OF 

PAPER AND STATIONERY, 

Aooount Book ICanufaoturir, 
44 Collins street East, Melbourne. 



EXPORT ORDERS PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



I OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISEE. 

A.T 181 KINO STREET 

J Special Appointment tu H.R.H. the Dnke of Edinburgh, also under 
Diatinguiaiied and Immediate Patronage of His Eicellencf the Governor. 




STEVENSON & ELLIOTT, 

dkfrik^e Suildef^ &. iBqportef^, 

Have the Largest, Cheq^est, and Best Selection of 

fiarriagts, ^uggics, Maggons tf garntss 

In the Colonies. 



IliTSIPECTIOIT H^rVITElD. 



Hannfaotory k Show Booms, 177, 179, &; 181 EIH3 STREET, Halbonme. 

WILLIAM CRUTCH, 
CAEEIAGE BUILDER 

6 & 7 Latrobe Street West, Uelbotmie. 

IS STOCK AND BUILDING— 

Landaus, BFoughams, Barouches. 
Queen's Phaetons. 
Four and Double-seated Buggies. 
Light Wagonettes. 



Note the Addbess— 
6 & 7 LATROBE STREET WEST, MELBOURNE. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 49 

THE "CHINA HALL," 

Lonsdale Street West. 

THE CHEAPEST PLACE IN MELBOURNE 



FOB ALL KINDS OF 



China, Glass, & Croekery\vare, 

Is at the great Emporium known as the ''China Hall," where you see a large 
and varied Assortment of all classes of Ware, and please yourself thoroughly 
about any article you may desire before purchasing. 

All Goods guaranteed of Best Quality, and parties would do well if before 
buying they visited this Establishment. 

Dinnerwcure of newest patterns and designs, all prices. 
Breakfast & Tea Sets, Best China, splendid assortment. 
Dessert Ware in either French or English China, various designs. 
Suites of Cut & Frosted Glassware, at prices not to be equalled. 

A LARGE AND VARIED ASSORTKENT OF 

CUT TUMBLERS, WINES, DECANTERS, CUT NOBBLER GLASSES 
CUSTARDS, JELLIES, &c., ALWAYS IN STOCK- ' 



The Trade Supplied at Lowest Wholesale Hates. 
Do not forget and call before purchasing, at 

The "China Hall," Lonsdale-street West, Melbourne, 

Near the new Law Courts. 

JOHN DYNON, Proprietor. 



C. A. BERRY, 

ASSAYER, MELTER * REFINER, 

175 8WAN8T0N STREET, MELBOURNE. 



All Qualities of Bullion Bought and Sold. 



ALL QrAUTIE.S OF SWEEPINGS BOUGHT. 

BATTERY PLATES 

.SPECIALLY TilEATED. 

,■ ^- ^ — ^ ^ ^ ^ ^.^^^^^.^^-^^^^.^^ 

GOLD EnBACTED 11:011 WLY^i LESGilPIION OF ALLOY. 
ASSAYS SENT TO ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD 

0>' litXKIPT OF Pfj«,TA*;E CTA.Vd-H. 



60 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



FOEBES, ELAM & OO.'S 



STAR 

Smith 



BREWERY, 

Street, CollingAvood. 



-AlNA-LYSIS. 



M 



Ha. 



lOth April, WB. 
I have analyaed a bnlk sample of 
"STAB" ALE, caUed £5. and described 
as a "keeping "Beer. It has: — 

Gravity 1004.73 

Aloobol, vol. per oent. 8.31 
Extract 4.22 

It is a fint-rate Ale, full and strong; 
of excellent flavour, and eminently calcu- 
lated to " keep." When aged, I snail not 
be suiprised to hear of its bemg sold as 
English, and approved as such. It has 
also the merit of being perfectly genuine 
(free even from salt). 



£4 ZZZ iUo. 

nth Mardi, 1875. 

I also analysed Ales in cellars ready to 
go out. I found the appliances in a state 
of thorough order and cleanliness. The 
materiaLs were of excellent, quality. The 
£4 Ale examined contains : — 

Alcohol, per cent. ... 8.0 
Extract (body) grains 

per gallon 1960. 

Its specific gravity is 1001.47 

It is a light but strong Ale, hlghlj 
hopped, and of excellent flavour. Lt is 
perfectly pure and wholesome. 



(Signed) 



SYDNEY GIBBONS, F.C.S., Analyst. 



M'CAW, ADAMSON & CO. 
Grain, Flour, & General Produce 

BROKERS. 

HOLD 

AT THEIR PRODUCE SALES ROOM, 

29 Little Collins Street West, 2ffel1)oiiriie, 

EVERY WEDNESDAY, OF EVERY DESCRIPTION OF 

FARM AND DAIRY PRODUCE. 



All consignments (if not othei wise instiucted) are first submitted to public competition 
and in the event of prices offered not being satisfactory such lots are withdimwn for 
disposal privately or by subsequent auction sale. 

Liberal Cash Advances made, when required, on Produce for Sale here or for Export 

Printed circulars containing every information as to terms, &c., will be forwarded 
on appUca^on. 

NOTE.— Fig Sale held as usual every Thursday at half-Dast Eleven o'clock, at the 
Corporation's Horse, Cow and Pig Market, top of Elizabetn-street, and account sales 
rendered at Market day oi sale. 



orrrciAL catalogue ADxneiiTisEit. m 

RAILWAY, HOIEL, A OTHER CHARGES SAVED, 



BY PBOCEGDIK^G AT ONCE TO TttlS 



DBAPERY EMPORIUM 



To make purchases of any of the foUowing :-«Uk SMMII^ SM14|0I|I 

BeeoBdnff Bonnots, KiyTitfiniMt, or other good thlttgt not to he Ima in flauii- 

hiirst, Castloname, Ballarat, or Geelong; or to purchase Household PletitflhiUtfi, 
as Carpets, Floor-doths, Bed Linen, &c., for which this Kstablishmettt is so Justly 
renowned. 

Gentlemen will be doubly welcome home by exhibiting the kind fot^thougbt 
of taking presents from the metropolis, for the dear ones. 

Cabs and 'Buses start from ^urke-street everv few miuutes^ and stop ftt my 
door — fare onljr 3d. — and the drive is likely to be instructive to a refleotive mind 
that cannot fail to see the progress made in so few years in this gteat thmigh 
young metropolis. 





SMITH STREET, COLLINQWOOD, 

Numbers 126, 128, \30, U1, \U, 130 and m, 

Gordon & Gotch, 

PRINTERS' BROKERS, 

HELB0UB5E: LOJfJX;}^; f^YtfFir,^: 

85 coiiiMs ST. HIST. ST. ftftf&E ^T., wbwt mm. m dimt ST. 

Sol^ A^<5nt^ tor 

of PristzzM^ ILaCeriak, Jtvenf^etf^ Ste. 

aad Aiutrauiat. The X^axi^ea^ P.-nnt^nqr Tnk f^^/^ m ^h<» W'>r]<i. 
.4. iR, tf.emdvt*f ^ Oy. ant"* ttj-tf^if^tf rpM/>i^l ^r^^Afi/^ f/y fh^ j^f/f^^rf^^fAff* ^ /y*f* f^ 

Pis WW By Fap^r 3n4 iUhef «>'it?i?><3f Msv^hin*^, 5^Vr«»^ an/1 J^ip'Jtro^z/^^Ttqf Ma- 
Hhimry, Jt^s. 

WILLIAX KOTC:X i^.'RY. >f5*iinff»r'e»7rT <;.? P-^'rtirc' and ^ffh^ 5r?nhV i>Hrk'''*r ^^ 
Xachine Tap««; M»k*T ^f t,h« i^VhJ*«->ri)lH rtlw^kH f/^r Hi^i'-Tcm >,tth<v .vfnrrhtn*^. 



52 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 

LUNCH FOR THE MILLION. 

fJlHE anticipated rush to the forthcoming Victorian Exhibition, and the absolute 
■'' necessity of providing Refreshment for the Visitors, has attracted considerable 
attention. Though tiie subject has somehow missed the records of the "Hansard" 
reporters, 

THE CHIEF SECRETARY, 

in reply .to a question from an Hon. Member, stated that after making due 
inquiries, 

THE GOVERNMENT 

had come to the determination to recommend to all Country Cousins and others a 
visit to 

THE JOHN BULL HOTEL, 

LITTLE COLLINS STREET WEST, 

where daily a most varied BILL OF FARE is offered to all and every. 

W. BAKTOIT, Proprietor. 

DUNCKLEY & M'BRIDE, 

MANUFACTUEEES OF 

Sheep and Fig Sausage Casings, 

"Whip Gut, Clock Gut, Gut Lathe Bands, 

Everlasting Sash Lines, 
Venetian Blind Strings, &c. &c. 



FACTORY: ABATTOIRS' RESERVE, SALTWATER RIVER. 

OFFICE: 

28 A'Beckett Street East, Melbourne. 



Messbs. MAILLER & QUIRREAN, 79 Wall-street, New York. 
HENRY W. PEABODY & CO., 41 India Wharf, Boston. 
WILLIAMS, BLANOHARD & CO., San Francisco. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGDE ADVERTISER. a 

GEORGE WOODS & CO.'S 

CABINET ORGANS, 




all other Reed 
InstrumentB. 



INSPECTION SOi:.ICITBI>, 

OSBORN, GUSHING and CO., 

44 William Street, Melbourne. 

MANUFACTUREftS' AGENTS FOR THE AUSTRALIAN COLONIB& 

PJVTENT AMERICAN 

RUBBER STAMP MANUFACTORY. 



Choice 
Assortment 



a?. OX..A.ZC.EC 

54 Swanston-st., Melbourne. 

SEE EXHIBITS. 




54 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 

CHABLE8 F. MAXWELL, 

LAW BOOKSELLER AND PUBLISHER, 

74 CHANCERY LANE, MELBOURNE. 



d-A-T^iiOa-TJES oiT jLT>T>XiXCJLrcxo2sr. 



GEORGE ROBERTSON, 
Impoi^ter of Books and Stationery, 

PUBLISHER AND MANUFACTURING STATIONER, 

33 AND 35 LITTLE COLLINS STREET WEST, MELBOURNE, 

AUD 1, 3, 6 AMD 7 M*KILLOP STREET. 



WHOLESALE STATIONERS AND IMPORTERS, 

MACHINE printers; AND PAPER BAG MANUFACTURERS, 

178 ELIZABETH STREET, MELBOURNE. 



Always on hand, a large and well-assorted stock of Colonial-made Paper 
Bags, for Grocers, Storekeepers, Confectioners, Fruiterers, Drapers, ftc. 

BtorekeeperB and the Trade supi^ed at Wbolesale Moes. 



AGENT AND IMPORTER 



OP 



Virtue & Go.'s Standard and Copyright Fublioations, 



AND SYDNEY. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 65 

THE FULTON FOUNDRY COMPANY 

Engineers, Iron and Brass Founders, Millwrights, 

BOILEHMAEERS, BLACKSMITHS, k SHIPSMITHS, 

Manufacturers of Steam Engines and Boilers — marine, locomotive, and stationary; 
Flour Mills, Bark Mills, Sugar Mills, Quartz Crushing^ Machines, Chilian Mills, 
Puddling Machines, Gold Retorts, Pumps, Saw-mill Machinery— vertical and drcular; 
Screw Wool Presses, Rack Wool Presses, Hydraulic Wool Presses, Waterhole Scoops. 
Boring Rods, Centrifugal Pumps, etc 

Yarra Bank Soutl!, opposite Spenoer-st., Melbourne. 

S. J E J^ N 8 & C O.'S 

IMPROVED 

Iflalenl lltflettor ^as Cooking %p[arato, 

AND CHEERFUL GAS WARMING STOVES, 

For Office, Large Rooms, Parlours and Bed-rooms. 

These Stoves have been put to every possible test and have given the greatest satisfaction, 
and are acknowledged to be the best and most complete Gas-cooking Stoves yet brought 
before the public ; and having no gas inside the oven, meet with general approbation. 
On sale at the 

Manu&otorieSy High Street, St. Elilda, 

AND AT ALL IRONMONGERS IN MELBOURNE. 



^ALE LOOKS (See Blocks at the Exhibition). Cannot be picked. 
^ The most convenient K.ey. The Safest Lock. Adapted for Bankers' Drawers 
and Tills and all uses. No two Keys alike, unless so .ordex^ Manufactured by the 
Tide Lock Company (Stamford, Conn., U.S.). 



AGENTS FOB AUSTRALIA—- 



BENABD BBOTHEBS and GO., 12 William Street, Melbourne. 

To be had from 
WHITNEY, CHAMBERS & CO., and all HARDWARE MERCHANTS. 



RENARD BROTHERS and CO., INDENTERS of BELGIAN, FRENCH, 
GERMAN and AMERICAN GOODS. Agents for PRELLBRS WINES, 
CLICQUOT CHAMPAGNE, and DUBOIS BRANDY. Wool and Tallow Brokers 
and Commission Merchants, Antwerp and Melbourne. 



Awarded Prize Medal 




St. Crispin Iron^vorks. 



iMTERMATioHAL Exm- FLEMINQTON ROAD, 

"^""•sylT""' Near the Royal Hotel, Hotham. 

Manufacturer of Il^n Lasts and Stands. Sole and Heel Knives, Cutting, Pricking, 
Rolling and Blocking Machines; and every article used in the Manufacture of 
Boots and Shoes. __^ 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 

105 Qneeasberry Street West, Eotham, 

MANUPACTUKKE OP 

rC^art^ ® inttotas, ^Itsr-pims, ic.\ 

' Crests, Mottoes, Coata-of-Arme, Szc., Embossed on Glass. 

II Importer of Window QlEisa, Lead, Oils, Colours, and III 

Paperpangings, &o. &o. 

C3-BlSrET?,^ft.L DEOOI^ATOR,. 

Estimates given for" General Works. 

FERGUSON & URIE, 
GLASS STAINERS, 

No. 10 Collins Street East. 

Memorial, Heraldic, and Grisaille; Stained Glass Windows lor Churches and 
other Buildings, exeonted at tlie Stained Glaaa Works, Curzon -street. North Hel- 
boome, niaminated Commandniciits and Wall Decorations; Embossed Plate and 
Sheet Glass, any pattern ; Lead Lights in Cathedral, Crown, Sheet and Ornamental 
Glass. Designs submitted with Estimate of Coat, Awarded tvo Medals, Mel- 
boame Exhibition, 1867. 

Stained Glass Works, Curzoii-street, North Helbonme. 

WILLIAM MATHEWS, 

PIANOFORTE MANUFACTURER, 

30 Clarendon Street, Emerald Hill, 

Harino obtained the only Prize for entered Pianos at the Intercolonial EiiUbltioii held 
in Uelboume in 18T2-3 (purchased by the Comnussioners and forwarded to London, and 
mnce received the Gold Medal), begs to inform the Public of the ColonieB that his 
Pianos are eBpecially manufactured to stand a semi-tropical climate, and made (^ the 
best materials. 

From Tert7-flTe Chilaeu to order. 
W. M. is now showing two Pianos specially made for tiiis EzhibitiiHL 

Victorian Asylum and School for the Blind, 

ST, KILIDJi. KO^X). 

THE Committee of Management infite attention to the Assortment, and solicit 
Orders for the supply of BASKETS, BBDSHWAEE, kc, manufactured by the 
Blind, riz.:— 

Bottle, Butchers', Grocers' and Fruit Baskets, 

Lftnodry, Soiled Linen, Heticule, Travelling, Work, Waste Paper, and Warehouse 

Baalute, Bassinets and Perambulators. 
Clothes Brushes, Blacking, Scrubbing Brushes, Bass Brooms. 
Coir Mats, Fish, Fruit, and Horse Nets, etc. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 57 

WILDING & CO., 
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERS 



MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS 

Every Description of Machinery 

FOB STATION OE FARM USE. 

Screw Bolts, Nuts, fiivets, Spikes, Permanent Way Fastenings, dc. 




Uie Auatrabon Colaniee, and 



THE PATENT CHAMPION EXCAVATOR, 

For Tank anil Dam making, moves one cubic yard per minute, horsea or buDocka 
and one man bfing required to work it. During the laat six months more than 70 
of these machines have been sent up-country, and reference is permitted to leading 
equattera who are using them in each of the colonies. 

THE PATENT CHAMPION DRAINER 

For rumiing Surface Drains. Most of the working parts of this machine arc 
BimilaT to those in the Champion Excavator, and at a small additional cost the 
two machines may be combined. 

For fnrthet particulars and prices of the above, and any other kind of Machinery 
required for Pastoral or Agricultural purposes, apply to ollr Office, 

Comer of ELIZABETH and LATEOBE STEEETS, Melbourne. 
Factoby— i'BECKETT STREET WEST. 



6S OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



i873. fm^ ^^^^' 

▲iTarded First Prise, ^^Df^W ^^"^^^ IffedaL 

DAVID CARSON 

IMPORTER AND MANUFACTURER OF 



J 



JfirskIassl00ts anir§|[0£s 



93 SWANSTON STREET, 



MELBOURNE. 



New and Second-hand Type, Printing Material, &c. 

PALE GOLD AND METAL LEAF. 




AND PRINTERS' DRY COLOURS. 



COOKE BROTHERS, 

PRINTERS' BROKERS, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF PRINTING INK, 

78 COLLINS STREET EAST, MELBOURNE, 



NEXT DOOB TO "ABGUB" OFFICK. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER 59 

BY APPOINTMENT TO THE MELBOUHNE HOSPITAL. 



vr. vr o »r xs s. 

Surgical Instrumeiit and Truss Maker, 

(opposite the melboubne hospital) 

106 XiOIsrSID.A.IjEJ STS^EEO? EJLST. 

Haker of ArtificiBl Legs, Hands, Arms, Spinal Sapporte, Leg Instniments, Lace Stockings, Knee Caps, 

Rests, Cmtches, Splints, and all kinds of Ins^ments for the Cure of Deformities. 
Suigical, Dental, and Veterinary Instruments, Cutlery, &c.. Made, Repaired, Ground and Set daily. 

Mrs.. JONES will attend LADIES. 

A Kew Cure for Indigestion, Heartburn, Acidity in the Stomach, ftc. 

IF yon are snflering from any of the above aUments, try a few of the HEW HEALTH LOZENGES. 
(See Testimonials). 

The Podoph jllin Lozenge, deprived of all unpleasant taste, will be found an excellent remedy for 
Liver Ck)mpiaint8, and is particularly adapted to those snileiing from Chronic Constipation. 

The Anti-Diphtheric or Snlphnr Lozenge prevents the attack of Diphtheria, and relieves 
Haemorrhoids, or Piles. 

The Breath Lozenge cleanses the Mouth and purifies the Breath. 

The Pain-Destrojer Lozenge relieves pains In the Stomach only, Spasms, &e. 

All Chemists, Grocers, &c.. 

Or Wholesale from S. CAPPER, 1 QUEEN STREET, Melbourne. 

N.B.->An Assortment of Drugs, &c.) always on hand. 



i-K ^ !I»^ 



BENBOW'S ALT ERATIVE MIXT URE FOR DOGS. 

TESTIMONIAL FROM LORD LURGAN. 

Brownlow House, Lnigan, Ireland, December 5, 1873. 
I have used Benbow's Mixture for some years for my greyhounds, and am quite satisfied that it 
improves the health and condition of the dogs. (Signed) LUBGAN. 

DAVY & ROCKE, Sole Ajreuts for Victoria, 

IMPORTERS OF DRUOS, CHEMICALS, HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICINES, &c. 

160 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne. 



3 FLINDERS LANE EAST, 

GOLD AND SILVER LACE IMPORTER, 

MILITARY AND MASONIC EMBROIDERER. 



FRIENDLY SOCIETIES' REGALIA of every description. 

Gold and Silver FringCi Lace, Trimmings, &c. Theatrical Appointment8« 

l2 



60 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 

DOUGLAS & CAMERON, 

108 & no FLINDERS LANE EAST 

(Comer of Russell Street), 

IMPORTERS OF MARBLE AND ENAMELLED SLATE CHIMNEY PIECES, 

DINIHOROOM, DRAWINOROOM AND BEDROOM 

GrateS) FenderB and rire-irons ; Kitohen Banges, Gnsaiiers, BracketB, and 

every desoiiption of QasfittingB, 

Wnten's Patnt Tire Tllee and Eneanstle PaToment. Tiles, 

ZIMDAR'8 PATENT PNEUMATIC BEUB; 

And extensive Mainffaclurere of Oasfiitini/s 0/ all kinds. Any design made to order 

See ExJiibiU in Exliibition. 

OTIIOS. -WAXt^XJUVOia, 

MANUFACTURES OF 

Galvanised Iron Spouting, Piping, 



prill an* doreupW Itoti, (Jwt gwn, ffl.«J. mi 
(titmrnMul £>utt«iiig, 

23 BOUEKE STREET WEST, 
BETWEEN EUZABETH AND QUEEN STKEETS, MELBOURNK 

WILLIAM RADFORD, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TINSMITH, 

IMPOETEE OF GALVMISED IKON, TIH PLATES, &o., 
19 LITTLE BOURKE STREET EAST, MELBOURNE. 

Auiarded Sillier Medal at SxhibitUm of 1872-3. 

Saths, Tanks, Cheese Tuba, Vata, and all kinds of Domestic and Dairy Utensils, 

on hand and made to order. All kinds of Fassengeis' Tinware always on haatl. 

REPAIRS NEATLY DONE. 

F. PTTX^I^inXCIi-ESXl, 

KITCHEN RANGE MANUFACTURER, 



m 



JOBBING AND LOCKSMITH, 

GASFITTEE, 




51 BELLfTAINGER, 

Eepaira Promptly Executed. 
OFF FLINDERS LANE WEST, MELBOUENE. 



(»FICIAL CATALOaUK ADVKRTI:^ER. CI 



THOMAS EVANS, 

AUSTRALIAN TENT 8t TARPAULIN FACTORY, 

2 and 4 Bourke Street West, Kelboxume, 

(Oppoaite eoner to Pbsl-alfiee), 
MPOBTEB of CAXTAS. DUCK, DKILLS. &c All kinds of CAXYAS 



I 



WORK made to order. Sun BlindsL Mazqnees, Sick Corers, BiM^e^ Hofiiiig, 
Canvas Water Bags. Voucbera^ Patent Hose. Jcc ic 



W^. R FURLONG & CO., 

87 Elizabeth Stbeet, Melbourne. 

PIANOS ON JIIME^PAYMENTS. 

NEW MUSIC! NEW MUSIC! 
Orders from the Country promptly attended to. 



narxzix. -vir :b: x a? zi, 

PRIZE BUGGY & WAGGONETTE BUILDER, 

244 & 245 Swanston -street, & 6, 8, 10, & 12 Stewart-street, 

]^£B H. B O TTRIsTB. 



Awarded Gold 'Medal for Special Merit, London Exhibition, 1873 ; Silver and 
Bronze Medals, International Exhibition and National Agricultural Society's Show, 
1873 ; and Two Silver Medals and one Extra Pi'ize at National Agricultural Society's 
Show, 1874. 

Patentee of the Improyed Oarriage and Buggy Head. 

Phjotographs and Price Lists on applicaium, 

LLOYDcfe SON. 

atent Mmhia ^M anKr Sautter Paimfattums, 

2 BOND STREET. MELBOURNE. 
Obtained Honorable Mention, Exhibition 1872-73, 

Orders Executed on the Shortest Notice. Estimates given. 

L. 4k 8, are the (mly Patentees and Sole Manufacturen of their Improved Check Action 
Ven^ian Blind, which is superior to anything yet introduced. 



62 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISiSR. 



70 ELIZABETH STREET (opposite Age Office), 

WHOLESALE and RETAIL IRONMONGER, 

AND GENERAL IMPORTER 




C. G. ROESZLER, 

§0okbinbtr9' C00I anir §l0x:h €rxtttx, 

Die Sinker and General Engraver, 

Mannfactuier of Numerical Printing Machines, Embossing Presses, 
Door and Window Plates, &c. 

41 Swanston-street, MelbotLrne. 



M'CALL, ANDERSON & CO., 

MANUFACTXJBERS OF 

ENGINES, BOILERS, VATS, 

OirderSi Mill Oearing, Shafting, 
PULLEYS, &c., 

CALL particular attention to their 
BOILERS having given universal 
satisfaction. Great economy in Fuel, and 
superior workmanship New and second- 
hand Boilers always on hand 

138 Flinders-lane W., Melbourne. 

Bepairs executed on the shortest notice. 



THOMAS TOZER, 
Vulcan Foundry, 

A'BECKETT & LATROBE STREETS, 

MBLBOTJBNE. 



STEAM ENGINES, Saw and Flour 
Mill Gearing, Shafting, Pulleys, &c. 
Latest improved Moulding, Planing, 
Tonguing and Grooving Machines al- 
ways in course of manufacture. All de- 
scriptions of 

BOILERS, GIRDERS, &c.. 

Manufactured on the shortest notice. 



JOHN HARKER, 



SPENCER STREET, MELBOURNE, 

Opposite Bailwa^ Station. 



ALEXANDER BRAID, 

Agricultural Implement Maker & General Blacksmitli, 

Wreckyn-street (off Flemington-road) Hotham, 



MBLBOITBNB. 



Ooachbuilders' Ironmonger and Timber Merchant, 

steam-bent Timber to order. Hay Bakes ; Axe, Pick, Broom, and other Handles mannfadiuwd. 

167 RusseU-stFeet, and 85 Great Lonsdale-street. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 63 

PURE VICTORIAN WINES. 

THE Proprietors of the TABILE VINEYARD having now aocumalated a large 
Stock of MATURED NATURA.L WINES, have determined upon bottiing and 
snppljring the same at the uniform price of 18s. per dozen. The Wines may ^ ob- 
tained through anj Wine Merchant, Grocer, or Storekeeper throughout the Colony 
and at the Vineyard Depot, 85 Little Collins-street East, Melbourne. 



ESTABLISHED 1864. 

MOSS, WHITE & CO., 

QUEEN STBEET, MELBOURNE, 

Cobaxtff, Cigar, ^ $mU Uert^aitts ^ Sanufattuwrs, 

IMPOBTEBS OF 

TOBACCONISTS' FANCY GOODS, &c. 



Awarded Prize Medals (see Reports) Paris, Dublin, London ic Melbourne Exhibitions. 
AU Artides guaranteed manufactured out of Imported Leaf sddy. 



ULLATHORNE& Co., 

IMPORTERS of CLOSED UPPERS, 
SHOE MERCERY & GENERAL 
GRINDERY. 



Bnglish Calf Skins. 

French and Qennan do., of all the best brands. 

Bast India Elp, &c. 

Bnglish and American Hides, and all other 
Leather for Coach Builders and Saddlers. 

Qenoine Cod Oil, Siunach, Yalonia, &o. 

Pearson's Wax Thread Machines for Boot- 
makers and Saddlers. 

Boot and Shoe Machinery of all descriptions 
and latest improTements. 

Bark Mills, Tanners' Boilers, &o. 



SADDLERY AND HARNESS. 



E8TAB. J. ADAMS, 1853. 
94 Elizabeth-street, 

IS now selling at REDUCED PRICES 
the entire Stock of SADDLERY, 
HARNESS, &c., comprising : — 

Ladies', Gents', Boys', and Girls' Sad* 
dies, Pilches, &c. 

Carriage, Buggy, Gig, Spring Cart, 
and Dray Harness. 
, . Whip, Spurs, &c., with 

10 Little Collins-street West. I Erery Article connected with the Trade. 



CITY BREWERY. 



•9 

119 & 121 COLLINS STREET WEST, 

AND V 

110 LITTLE COLLINS STREET WEST, MELBOURNE. 



BREWER, DISTILLER, AND MALTSTER, 

Victoria Parade, East Melbourne. 



^ 



64 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



MEDAL 

1873, 

VIENNA. 



NINE EXHIBITION PRIZE MEDALS. 



MEDAL 

1873, 

MOSCOW. 



MEDALS 

AT NINE 

EXHIBITIONS. 



CIOCOLATE & COCOA 



in great variety, specially packed for exportation. 




C ABAC AS COCOA 



Prepared with Caracas and other choice growths of Cocoa. 
" A most delicious and valuable arfic?^."— STANDARD. 



J. S. FRY and SONS, Union-st, Bristol, 

And 252 CITY BOAD, LONDON. 




MELBOURNE PERMANENT 

Incorporated under the " BtuUding Societies Act^ 1874.** 

INVESTORS --——— 

Are guaranteed 9 per cent compound interest, computed monthly. Can join 
the Society at any time, and have no back subscriptians to pay. Can with- 
draw when they choose, with interest to date of withdrawal. Do not forfeit 
their subscriptions by negleot of payment. 

BORROWERS 

Share in the profits equally with the Investors. Lowest current 
rates charged. No Premiums to pay. Can redeem at any time on payment of 
balance of unpaid principal. Pay no Redemption Fees on withdrawinpr. If 
unable through affliction, or any other cause, to continue their 
payments, may have them entirely suspended for a time, and 
no fines will accrue during such suspension. 

DEPOSITORS 

Have Interest allowed at the following rates :• 



At Call 
8 Months 
6 Months 
12 Months 
Office— 61 Elizabeth Stbebt 



4j^ per cent, per annum. 
6i do. do. 

6i do. do. 

7i do. do. 

J. JOHNSON, Segbetabt. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 65 

"W. J. L^^-ITDE cSc aO., 

COMMISSION KEECHAMS, 

AND Manufacturers. 



Anttersen s Vuhiugr UaoliiaeB, 

'V a.TiTilTigJ a OdoUiU 'B.n.Tiy 

Age ta and UanufiicCuren of 

Le 07 B Hon C ndnotiag CompMitlon, 




■Williama's Patent 

Compound Lever Wool Press, 



28 COLLINS STREET WEST, 

MELBOURNE. 



J. Gt- XE .A. IX .A. AS, 

lair gusscr, Wig Psh«, •^ttfnmtx, 

95 SWANSTON STREET, MELBOURNE. 



US eapecUllj Invited to [nspect the well-assorted Mock ot Eili Work, conilsUnK ot 

H of Rolli, Twlale, Curls, FrUeMes, «I. Alnya on hmd, a —'—-"-■ — ^^- - 

in beoudelaM rdj atylt on the premlscg, u the die ' -" 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



BY KOYAL n»«gaHWK LETTERS PATENT. 



This intimatioQ is to adviae the BuaineBs Public to look oat far 

BANNISTER, MILLIGAN & CO.'S 

PATENT METHOD OF ADVERTISING. 




VICTORIA 

J^^ STEAM BISCUIT FACTORY 

^tt MUler and Anderson Streets 







iKi ji'iinaers-laite west, 




































t" 


kS-r^s", 


Intercolonial 


qual 


tjnadNestaffiso 


fMuinlM*ure, 



ROBERT STEWART, 

©ittnisn & Cssmsitisn |ws,|^|i; 

Also, Orsuge Manqalade, Candied and Drdned 
Peel of bU kinds. 

158 Queen-st, Melbourne. 

VARNISH. 





VICTORIA YARNISH COMPANY'S 

Biand is recognised by the Trade, tbe Victorian Rsilwaja, and the Hobeon's Bay 
Railway Company ae being superior and better adapted to tbe Auatraliaa cUmate 
than any iropoTted brand. 

Hay be bad of tbe principal Oil and Colaurmen aod Iionmongere, and &t the 

Stores, 36 Market Street, Uelboorne. 

3ptciat Atlenti^i given to Export Ordtri. 

ALEX. BORTHWICK. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



€7 



A. STONEMAF, 
COACH & RAILWAY SPRING MANUFACTURER, 

STEPHENSON STREET, RICHMOND. 



Springs of every Description Made to Order. 

^tessts anlr Ctstimanids €^xmu)i ix^ lllnunnatelr 

IN FIBST-iLA.TB STYLB BY 

LUDWIQ LANG, College Lawn, Prahran. 

Orders taken at H. Thomas's Printing Office, 76 Little Collins-Bt., W. Melbourne. 



WE8LEYAN BOOK DEPOT, 

43 ELIZABETH STREET, 

6 doors South of Collins-street. 

A LARGE STOCK of WESLEYAN 
and other PUBLICATIONS always 
on hand suitable for Sunday School Li- 
braries, Rewards and Family Reading. 
Theological Works in great variety. 

Agents for John Ashworth's Strange 
Tales, Walks in Canaan, and other pub- 
lications. 

Catalogues on application, or Igr post for a two- 
penny stamp. 

J. C. SYMONS, Book Stbwaed. 



Perambulator Manufactory 

8 BRIDGE ROAD, RICHMOND, 

MELBOURNE. 

Established 1862. 



W.G. HOUGHTON & CO. 

WHOLESALE & RETAIL 

PERAMBULATOR MANUFATURERS 



American Buggies, Bath Chairs, and In- 
valid Carriages of all descriptions. 



MR. M. HENNESSY, ARCHITECT, 4c., 

13 Swanston Street, Melbourne. 

R. MONTGOMERY, 

Cork Merchant and Importer, 

40 LITTTLE COLLINS STREET W., MELBOURNE. 

Between Eliaabeth and Qneen Streets. 

FRANCIS, BIRLEY & CO., 

3 COLLINS STREET WEST, MELBOURNE. 
Frank A. Flint. 



70 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 

KILNER'S FACTORY, 

BOSISTO STREET, RICHMOND, 

POSSESSING every facility, with the appliance of Steam-power and Machinery, 
for the Manufacture and Repair of Musical Instruments. English, French, 
and German Pianofortes can be tnoroughly Repaired, at greatly reduced charges. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Pianos and Material on Sale. Bass Strings made to order. 

ANY DESCRIPTION OF PIANO MANUFACTURED. 



PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED 

Melbourne, 1866-67-70 ; Sydney, 1870. 



JAMES M'EWAN, 

Cabinet & Chair lanufacturer, 

861 SPENCER STREET, MELBOURNE. 



Household and Office Furniture of every description made to order in a superior 
manner. Awarded First Prize, Gold Medal, Melbourne Industrial Exhibitions, 
1856, 1858, 1862, and 1867. 

WATSON & PATERSON, 

HAM & BACON CURERS, 

Wholesale & Expokt Provision Merchants, 

Comer of Bourke & Queen Streets, Melbourne, 

HAVE ON SALE — Hams and Bacon, Smoked and Rolled, in every variety. 
Lard in Bl^ulders, Tins, Casks, &c. BeSf Hams, Mutton Hams, Ox Tongues, 
and Mess Pork, in Barrels and Half-barrels, messed in Kavy fashion. Export 
Orders carefully and promptly executed. Goods specially prepared for shipment. 
All Goods sold by the firm guaranteed. 

GEORGE FINCHAM, 

(From the late Jas Bishop, of London, who Invented the Composition Pedals, the Anti-concussioii 

Valve, and the Clarabella), 

BRIDGE ROAD, RICHMOND, MELBOURNE. 

G. F. was awarded £100 by the Government for saccessfully establishing the Industry of Oigan 
Biulding in Victoria ; also received a Medal at the Exhibition of 1866-67. 



WILLIAM EVETT, GOLD & SILVER BEATER 

TO THB VICTOBIAlir OOYERNMENT, 

OFnCE: 8TAFF0BD CHAMBERS, 49 ELIZABETH STREET. 
FACTORY : 85 YORK STREET, EMERALD HILL. 

Awarded Bronze Medal, Intercolonial Exhibition, 1866-67. Awarded Bronze Medal, Agricaltnnl 
Society of New South Wales Exhibition, 1878. 

Exhibits to be Seen in the Technoloqical Museum. 






OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 71 

JAIBS lEI&ITOU & CO^ 

TRUNK AND PORTMANTEAU 

MANUFACTURERS, 

Tailors and General Outfitters, 

91 ELIZABETH ST., MELBOURNE. 



All Goods made on the Premises by Experienced Workmen. 

CLOTHING OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS KEPT IN STOCK, 

Beady Made, of the Choicest Material and Latest Fasliion, under our 

own supervision. 



As we keep a first-class Cutter, we guarantee a perfect fit to 

anyone favouring us with a trial. 



DUDGEON & ARNELL, 

Tobacco and Snuff Manufacturers, 

IMPORTERS OF TOBACCO, SNUFF AND CIGARS, 

126, 127 and 129 Lonsdale Street West, Melbourne. 

J. R. WEBSTER, 

Watch & Chronometer Maker, 

JEWELLER AND OPTICIAN, 

35 BOURKE STREET EAST, MELBOURNE, 

(Between Buckley and Nunn's and John Cleeland's Albion Hotel), 

-A.NX> -AlT 184: BMITH STS££:T, COL.L.INGTVOOD. 



72 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



PEAPES AND SHAW, 

Tailors, Hosiers, Gloyers, 

SHIRT AND COLLAE MANUFACTUEEES, 
338 AND 340 GEORGE STREET, 

SYDNEY. 



JOHN ZEVENBOOM, 

WHOLESALE 

PAINT AND GENERAL BRUSH MANUFACTURER AND BRISTLE MERCHANT. 

Wareliouse~223 Elizabeth St. Factory— 12 a*Beokett St. 



BROADBENTBROS.&CO., 

General Oarriers & Forwarding Agents 

91 FLINDERS LANE WEST, 

MELBOUBNB. 

Moorabool Wharf, Geelong; Railway 
Goods Stations — Ballarat East and West, 
Clunes, Creswick Beaufort, Ararat, Mary- 
borough, Talbot, DunoUy, Wangaratta, 
Wodonga, Echnca, Sandhurst, Castle- 
mainc ; and in all the Colonies & Europe. 

Bills of Lading and Bond Certificates Cleared. 

Wool Contracts taken. 

Goods Forwarded and Shipped to aU parts. 



FRENCH STAY WAREHOUSE, 

92 RUSSELL STREET. 



Madame Deeourtet, 

(From Paris), STAY MAKER. Corset 
Hygienique for hot climates, made to 
order and ready made. 

Stays, Ladies' Belts, and Braces for 
Toung Ladies. 

AH descriptions of Stays made on the 
premises. 



DILLON & BURROWS, 

Manufacturing Confectioners & Importers, 

LATROBE STREET WEST, MELBOURNE. 
Branch Factory - - 147 Little Lonsdale Street East. 

o. J. x» .A. xft -r xft X x> ca- B, 

Cigar Manufacturer and Tobacco Merchant, 

143 RUSSELL ST. (Opposite Alcock & Co.'s Billiard Factory) MELBOURNE. 

WM. PYLE & CO., 

PLUMBERS, GASFITTERS, AND REFLECTOR MAKERS, 

IMPORTERS OP 

CHANDELLEJRS, GLOBES, PLUMBERS' & GASFITTERS* BRASSWARE, 

53 FUnders Lane East, next door to Swanston St., Melbourne. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 73 



THE ATTSTRALIM 

(LIMITED) 

297 and 299 Bmnswick Street, Fitzroy, 

Are now prepared to supply the Public with the follo^ving Articles, all 

of the very best quality : — 

WASHING POWDER, in Gross Boxes. 

BAKING POWDER, in Tins or Packets. 

SEIDLITZ POWDERS. 

CHASTILLIER'S HAIR RESTORATIVE. 

HAIR OIL (PERFUMED). 

CASTOR OIL. 

SALAD OIL. 

LIME JUICE. 
LIME JUICE AND GLYCERINE. 

CULINARV ESSENCES. 

CASTOR OIL, FOR Lubricating Purposes. 

BLACKING, in Gross Boxes. 

VINEGAR, IN Bottle and Bulk. 

CURRY POWDER, in Tins. 

PERFUMERY. 

SHERBET. 

SULLIVAN'S DISINFECTANT POWDER. 

NEW NON-CONGEALING HAIR OIL. 

„ ** LICK," FOR Prevention and Cure of Fluke in 

Sheep. 



297 and 299 BBUXTSWZCE ST., FZTZB07. 



74 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 

JAMES S. RID DELL, Plumber d Gasfltter, 

IMPORTER OF GASALIERS, BRACKETS, &c., 
REFLECTOR AND PATENT GAS BATH MANUFACTURER, 

120 Russell Street, Melbourne. 



Pumps, Baths, Gas-fittings, <Scc., Made, Fixed, <Sc Repaired. 

EXHIBITOR IN MACHINERY ROOM 

Of Patent Gas Bath in operation , and Reflectors and Reflecting Lam]ls for Gas and 

Kerosene. * 

KENT BREWERY, Lennox-street, Richmond. 

CLEMENT W. GRUEBER&CO., 

BREWERS AND BOTTLERS. 
Family Orders promptly executed. Samples for\varded if required. 



THOMAS WEATHERILL, 

BRIDGE ROAD, RICHMOND, 

MANUFACTURER OF FIRST-CLASS PIANOS. 

Sold at Moderate Prices and on Easy Terms. 

THE TEMPERANCE NEWS, 

RECHABITE JOHENAL AND GOOD TEMFLAES' RECORD. 
A Monthly Journal issued in the interests of the Tempemnce Movement. 



Published on the 1st of each Month. Subscription 6s. per annum. 

Office: 37 FLINDERS LANE WEST. 

Eggs all the Year Round !! 



BY USING 



NORRIS'S CONDITI ON SPICE 

SOLD BY ALL GROCERS, CHEMISTS, & IRONMONGERS. 



MANTJPAOTORY: 70 Chapel Street, Prahran. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 75 

A. E. RICHMOND, 

(LATE WAKLEY), 

97 and 99 Bourke Street East, 

BespectfvUy reqnests tlie attention of Visitors to the EXHIBITION to his 



MILLINERY, 

Nos. i8S6 and 1887. 

SILK COSTUMES, 

No. 1828. 

JACKETS & APRONS. 

No. 1829. 

• 

Opening daily at the above Address, 

The Newest Styles direct from Paris and London, 

WRIGHT& EDWARDS 

ExramsERs, icELBouxtxrE. 



MAKERS AND EXHIBITORS 



OF THE 



Monster Fountain 



MANUFACTUEEES OF 



Every Description of Machinery. 



7« OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 

MURPHY'S PATENT 

VENTILATOR for CEILIlf&S. 



This Ventilator has now been extensively used for four y^ears. Its simplicity and 
excellence has procured for it an extensive sale in Victoria as well as in the other 
colonies. It has been AWAKDED PRIZE MEDLS from the Melbourne and 
London Exhibitions of 1872 and 1873. 

A huge Stock of CENTRE FLOWERS, of aU Sizes and Designs, made and kept 
in stocl^ to match the above. All kinds of Modelling executed. 

In addition to the above, E. MURPHY has lately designed and registered 

NE^V CHIMNEY CAP, 

Of pressed cement, which is constructed to prevent the down draft in Chimneys. It is 
handsome in appearance, and adapted for Chinmeys of idl designs. 

E. MXTRPHY invites inspection of the above, as well as of his other kinds of Plaster 
Ornaments and Pressed Cement Work, at his place of business, and 

On View at the Exhibition, in Depts. No. 14 and 15, No. 2187 and 2230b. 




8ANDRIDGE-R0AD, EMERALD HILL 

THE CITY OF MELBOURNE 

GAS AND COKE COMPANY. 

OFFICES: 9 COLLINS STREET WEST, 

Where, on notification, oomplalQts are attended to bj day or night. 

JOHN SCOTT, Secretary. 



RAILWAY IRON FOUNDRY, 

131 KING STREET, MELBOURNE. 











MAKERS of Punching and Shearing Machines, Crab Winches, 

Silent Blast Fans for Smiths' Fires and Smelting Furnaces, 

Engine, Mining, and Agricultural Castings of every descnption. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADYEETIS^ 77 

WM. JrCTLLOCH & CO., 




MZ^ 



INSURANCE, SHIPPING & CUSTOMS AGENTS. 

Head Office: 19 Queen Street Melbourne. 



B:B.A.Zjrc:H:ES. 

ARARAT ' >ANDHLRST WANGARATTA 



15ALLARAT t ECHLCA , 

CASTLEMALVE TALLARuoK 



SPRINGS 
^VODOXGA 



HAY, X.S.\V. ADELAIDE, PORT VICTOR and GOOLWA, S.A. 

AGENTS for— The Glol)e and R. P. Atkins* Parcels Express Companies. 

The Mnrraj, Mamunbidgee and Darling Rivers Line 
of Steamboats. 

ConsignmeDts delivered to any a^Mress in Australia, United Kingdom, Coniinent of 

Europe, or America. 

GRANT & CAMERON, FREEMANTLE & CO., 



z^:-*:-!* 



42 Fliiidam Lane West, Kdbovnie, 



IMPORTERS OF 



Importers of British, Foreign, and ♦ 

Colonial Seeds. PRINTERS' MATERIAL, 

„ ^ „ . ,. r,. . -, , And Agents for — 

Also, Exporters of all Australian 1 ree and ^hnib ,, ,., ^. , - ,- ~, 

Seeds, including Kiicahpti of sort-s, Acacias, , H. W. Ca>Ion «: (_o, TN-pefounders, 

Climbers, &c. J*- ^^ ui>tnne and J. KuUi vS: Co.. lakm.tkcrs. 

Hopkin>on &. Cope, Kn^inecrs. 

Warell01ISe-41 BonrkC St. West, KelbOlinie, Specimen Bo,>k> of Type and W.vhI Letter, and 
AL'sTKALiA. Complete Price Li>tJs sent on application. 



BATCH ELDER & CO., 

PHOTOGRAPHERS arid ARTISTS (Established 1854), execute Commissions iu 
all styles of Portraiture — Plain, Coloured, Mezzotint — on Moderate Terms, 
Specimens at address — 

41 COLLINS STREET EAST. 



7S 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



ESTA^BLISHED 18 68 



MarkbyandAzzoppardi 

ARTISTS, DESIGNERS, ENGRAVERS, 

LABEL & COLOUR BLOCK PRINTERS, 




Itrom0J|[^tanin^ 




rittfin3Jj^p0t 



220a ELIZABETH STREET, 

MELBOURNE. 

Eut Sidei four doon firom Latiobe St., five minnteB' walk from Post Office. 

(Late of 2 and 3 Herald Passage, Bourke Street Elast) 

EL EC TRO TYPISTSJND^ TYPiS TS. 

MARKBY & A^^OPPARDI 

Are prepared to famish Estimates for the supply of Stereotype and Electrotype 
Work at prices as low as any house in the trade, as their experience for many years 
in Edinburgh, London and New York has given them knowledge of all the latest 
improvements both in Bookwork and Type-high departments. 

F. STICKLAND, Coach Builder, 

135 LATROBE STREET EAST, MELBOURNE. 

INVITES intending purchaaen to inspoct his Stock of Sin{;1e and Double-seated Top and No-top 
Buggies, Phaetons, Waggonettes, Commercial and Express Wa^^ons, &c. 
Vehicles of all kinds made to order and repaired. 

JOSEPH ELLIS & CO., 
importers of 6albfamseir, ^laht, anb €axTngidtb Jrnn. 

Cast-iron Spouting and Fittings of all kinds. Wholesale Manufacturers of erery Deeeriptioo of 

Galranised Iron Spouting, Ridging, Piping, &c. 

54 & 55 FLINDERS LANE EAST (^^^S^). MELBOURNE 

GEORGE B. PERKINS, 

Commission and General Insurance Agent, 

BAY AND INGLIS STREETS, NORTH SANDRIDGE. 
A(Wt for Uui Soutk Australian liwnranm Company. 



OinCUL CATALWiCE ADVEETISES. » 

PAftKER A CO.S CiLU IPlOll PATEHT OVEH CHALLENGE COOKIHG STOVES. 




Parker & Co., 43 little Bonrke-at. E., & Bmirood-road, Hawthorn . 

H. H. BAILT, firom ttie LondoQ School of FHOTOOE&FHT. 

Piiu Mcdaffis. Hi^ieaAwvdfar AIbaaF«tnuu.UcIbsunicEihilimaii, iS66^. 

■II liiEi. fauhed u Uenaml. ScftM, Er Oil, whli ihc cnUeS dcbiacy. Albuiu D^ 
, BkUy Gill, Oifbril, and Fancy Fmaa. A Uigc iclcaiaa of Views of Tumuia 

HOBAJBT TO"WN'. 



Merchants, Wool Staplers and Brokers, 



SKIFMNG, COUUISSION AND INSUKANCE AGENTS, 
ALU. Cio. WutTU. Uniud Sulci Vuz-Coniul. 

114 and 116 UTopoca Btnrt, Rolwrt Town- 

M. F. DAlTl'"-'<SHS:.*'-*|Wlolesale and ramily GEOOER, 

Importer of China, Glass, Crockery, Bmshwere, Cullery, Ironmongery, .tc 

o^.A.xKX.sis ooxn-v-xiir. 

SHIP CHANDLER AND SAIL MAKER, 

Franklin Wliarf, Hobart Town, Taamania. 



IMPORTERS OF DRAPERY, 

ELIZABETH STREET, HOBART TOW .V. 



80 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ABVERTLSER. 



Welllng-ton Bridge, Hobart Town, 

gmprtwis 0f g00fei8, pusif , ^tatiowwy, and lawry (>>00ds. 

SPLENDID FINE ART GALLERY for Photos, Chromos, &c. Also, 
Store and ManuCeu^ry, 12 Macquarle-etreet, Hobart Town. 

Bookbiuders, Account Book Manufacturers, and Wholesale Stationers, and Im- 
|X)rtei*8 of Pianofortes, Cabinet Organs, and Harmoniums. 



WALGH BROTHERS AND BIRGHALL, BRISBANE STREET, LAUNGE8T0N, 

Importers of Books, Music, Stationery, and Fancy Goods. 
Ropresontotl in London by Messi-s. Joseph M. Holworthy & Co., 80 Great Bt, Helens, BLshopegaa- 

street, London. 
Vif Wti lch'a LiUrartf Intelligencer in pnbllHhcd montlily, & 1600 copies circulated t hronghout Tasmania. 

SPARKLING SODA WATER, GINGERADE, LEMONADE, 

AND TONIC WATER. 



WEA.VER, & CO., 

TO HIS EXCELLENCY FREDK. A. WELD, Esq., 

Messrs. WKAVKR & CO. Imving purchased the aole right of Barrktt's PATENT JEiiATKii 
Water BoT'ilk (requiring neitlier cork nor wire) in Southern Tasmania, can supply the abtivi- 
Whulesoniu Uevurugus in the Puteut Bottle. 

WILLIAM TURNER^ 

TANNER AND CURRIER, 

Launceston, Tasmania. 

LEATHER fc GRINDERY EMPORIUM, CHARLES ST. 

TANNERY, FREDERICK AND BATHURST STREETS. 

WOOL STORES, FREDERICK STREET. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF TASMANIAN SCENERY 

FROM ALL PARTS OF THE ISLAND. 



The Largest, Choicest, and most Varied Collection in Tasmania, comprising — 

Allaum. Stereosoopio, Oalai&et 10-S Inehes, and In eloffantly Bouid 
Booju of 1, 2, i, 8, and 12 Dozen Ohoioe Studies and Speoimens 
of Fliotoffrapliy. 

These are the most suitable reniin(lc'i*s to Visitors, and Pi-oscnts to Friends in Europe or Aiuitriilia. 

S. CLIFFORD, J32 Liverpool Street, Hobart Town. 

Prize Medallist in Melbourne. 
Highest Award at New Zealand for Landscape Photography. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. SI 



ROBERT JACKSON, 



IMPORTER OF 




lain ^ JfantD 




Account Books. Jet Jewellery. 

Combs and Brashes. Fancy Glassware. 



o:f E'VEie'Z' 3DESciaii>Ti02sr. 



08 ELIZABETH STREET, HOBART TOWN. 



Macfarlane Bros. & Co., 

Elizabeth-st. & New Wharf, Hobart Town, 

MERCHANTS & WAREHOUSEMEN, 



DIRECT IMPORTERS OF 

TEA, SUGAR, AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 



Zttdeata Sxeoutel oa ftivourable terms. 



Purchasers of WOOL, SPERM OIL, and WATTLE BARK, 

Or make liberal Cash Advances on the same consigned to their London friends. 



82 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



IsrEl"V7 









9P1M1B 



Nos. 3, 5 & 7 BOURKE STREET EAST, 



THE LATEST STYLES IN 

LADIES' COSTUMES, JACKETS AND MANTLES 



A CHOICE STOCK OP THE 



"^dmsi ^\^tB in f abws' Strafe anb %t^\mx ^ats, 

TRIMMED AND UNTRIMMED. 



SILK WARPS. 

IMPERIAL JAPANESE LINENS. 

PLAIN & FIGURED LUSTRES, &c 



SPLENDID VALUE (THIS SEASON) IN BLACK AND FANCY SILKS 



SUMMER HOMESPUNS. 
BALERNO CLOTHS. 
ARABIAN GLACES. 



NOW SHOWING, 

A SPLENDID LOT OF SUMMER PRINTS, 

WORTHY OF SPECIAL NOTICE. 



Note,— TAILORING In all Its branches, First-class Cutter and 

Workmen In the Order Department. 



OFFICIAL CATALOQOB ADVEPTI'sFB 




THE CARLTON PRIZE ALES 
Are Rckncirledged the purest Article prcrtiici^d in the Colonj. The Proprietor 
lias received Four Medals for the superior Quality of hi8,Ales, namelj :— At the 
'utereolonial Exhibition held in MeUiourue, 1866-67; Sydney, 1870; and Mei- 
lurae, 1873. Theae Ales are brewed with special relereuce to the requirements 
the climate, and are also Boitahle for export to India and the East. 



4 

84 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



I^ttstraltan ©lEteal Irobiknt ^qcuU 



(ESTABLISHED. 1849) 

FOB LIFE ASSURANCE 
Oir THE MUTX7AL FBINCIFLE. 



I<odkl ©ii'edtof^. 

Professor IRVING, M.A., Chairman. 



Pv. MURRAY SMITH, Esq., M.L.A. 
ARTHUR S. KING, Esq. 



J. B. MOTHERWELL, Rsq., M.D. 
The Hon. T. T. a'BECKETT, I^C. 



THE OLDEST MUTUAL JLIFE OFFICE ' ^mC^ ^' 

During the five years ended on the 31st December, 1873, after paying Claims 
by Death, and making unusually Large Reserves, THE GASH T or 

PROFIT EXCEEDED A QUARTER OF A MILLION, o jirhich 
£235,185 was set apart for Distribution amongst the Members, ample provi- 
sion having been made for 

SECURITY AND PROFIT IN TIME IQ CQME. 

£1,500,000 

Is safely Invested in Government and other First-class Securities. 

Policies NOT Forfeited for Non-payntcni 

of Premium 

If the Surrender Value will pay ONE Yearly Premium. 



MEMBERS ARE EXEMPT FROM PERSONAL LIABILITY 

llie Kew Begulatioiis grant Unnsnal Privileges. 



Povspectiises and Fm*ms of Proposal may he had on apjiUcatiou, 

N. MAINE, Resident Secretary, 

35 Queen Street, Melbourne. 



M'Carron, Bird & Co., Printers, 37 Flinders Lane West, Melbourne. 



^CORBETT & SON, 

MACHINERY 
IMPORTERS, 

PORTABLE STEAM ENGINES 

M MKI.IJOURiNK. b.lI.LAilAT. SANBHrKaT. ami KYNKTON. 

Aal the FIKST FSIZB9 for 

iTEAM THRESHERS, 

At B-VLL/VKAT. SANDHURST. KYNETON tiud BMEATt'N. 




MACHINERY LET ON HIRE, 

Witli option of purohaae extending over one or more years. 
Renta conaidered as instalments of pnrohaao. 

(gents for Margkall and Son's Patent Portable Steam Engines. 

ALSO, IN STOCK, 

jiGtNES BY RUSTON 4 PROCTOR AND CLAVTON & SHUTTLEWORTH. 

■uwM/* lUJS'SOMK A A'lMif CeUbrated SrSAM TUtlESllINa 
■ AND FimaniNG MAamHES, ^toS/wlDrutm. 



SVAKCSS UAilE ON UACHIKEST COHSIQNED FOK SAIiB. 

IndkN'I's Kxecuti-ii oil most C'oiivi'uient and Liberal Temis. 



UUASEl* ANli EXC1IAS0E1>. 



pflice-lS QUEEN STREET, Melbourne, 

Uachiskrv Yards— 16 FRANKLIN STREET. 



p R E M I E 

BUILDING. LAND. & INVESTMI 



ASSOCIATION. 



Office- 62 GoHins Street We 



• y¥KI\ii ^I'ECIAL ADVAMAGKf^ TO 



BORROWERS, 

UNUSUAL FAinrjTIES TO 

IISrVESTORS, 

AND HiriHE^T llATKs OK lN'l'KlllC>iT TO 

DEPOSITQ] 

^pmactilttn ttnd nverff uijarmativii cm' (11/ iiirl'f'i/fil iil [Ae 

62 COLLINS STREET WEST, Melbou 
JAIAES UiaAMS, &« 



lONDITION SPICi 



' kkST iw THZ UUUUC 



in t}id AostraUan Colonies. 





lonaasocd tat Fuuntsc 



1 Ta W. KOIUilS, Sole itlauaTacloi'tii, Praiifiui, MutI>4>io»<>. 



nportei'S & lanufa«turers of f i 

rHE CHEAPEST - ' l THE THADE. 




OAK LIBRABy SUITLS 
BEDROOU SQITES 



PHlCn LISTS OT< 
E tlTKSNBE erOOR. 10 sGteoi JfroiL 

. 42 Collins . 



AUG 4 - 1930 



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